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GySgtermey

Was the Omnibus a Trump Trojan Horse against Dems?

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 londonorchar    1,093
30 minutes ago, GySgtermey said:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DZFCPB3XUAEVr-n.jpg
 
03/24/2018  :pointing-down-smiley-emoticon:

Was the Omnibus a Trump Trojan Horse against Dems?

military tribunals funded by omnibus

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DZBeiMaWkAA3vus.jpg

Did Dems just fund their own tribunals?

(youtubeclipfull)

https://www.youtube.com/embed/hhqcFea_ZUk

A dream come true..........

:nodl:

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 Cinnamon    28,921

Time to get to the truth on this. The LEGAL truth of what it means. Start diggin and see what you can find out that isn't more bs. 

I have NO faith in the Q thing. Q doesn't matter here anyway, what matters are the legalities and differences between a Budget and an Omnibus bill.

I do not believe that anyone is handed over 1 Trillion dollars to spend the way they want it without oversight. 

@Zing has info regarding the OMB. I will start this discussion by linking to the OMB and showing a definition of it. Blanks will need to be filled in. 

https://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) serves the President of the United States in overseeing the implementation of his vision across the Executive Branch. Specifically, OMB’s mission is to assist the President in meeting his policy, budget, management and regulatory objectives and to fulfill the agency’s statutory responsibilities.

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 Cinnamon    28,921

Omnibus Bill Law and Legal Definition

Omnibus Bill is draft legislation before a legislature which contains more than one substantive matter, or several minor matters combined together as one bill. Such bill is introduced supposedly for the sake of convenience. A government can slip in a substantial change in legislation and present it as an omnibus bill. An "all or nothing" tactic is involved in presenting an omnibus bill in the legislature.

https://definitions.uslegal.com/o/omnibus-bill/

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 octopus prime    1,503
Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, londonorchar said:

Whats the long answer??

Hell no???

https://www.minnpost.com/dc-dispatches/2015/02/how-federal-budget-supposed-work-and-why-it-rarely-does

(Cut)

What happens then?

If a budget isn’t in place by Oct 1, the start of the fiscal year, the government could shut down.

Congress avoids shutdowns by passing a short-term budget bill maintaining current spending levels called a “continuing resolution,” or “CR.” These give lawmakers more time to either write the 12 individual budget bills, or wrap them altogether in one overarching budget called an “omnibus bill,” which directs federal spending across all of the 12 appropriations areas.

Are omnibuses common?

Congress relies on CRs and omnibuses a lot. The last time Congress actually passed every individual budget bill was ahead of the 2002 fiscal year, and it took 8 CRs to get there first. Congress has passed its appropriations bills without needing a CR only four times since the 1977 fiscal year, University of Minnesota Congress expert Kathryn Pearson said, referencing a Congressional Research Service report.

Last year, Congress passed three CRs before agreeing to an omnibus bill covering the current (2015) fiscal year … and that was an especially odd one.

What was so weird about this year’s budget?

Around the time Congress needed to pass an omnibus bill, President Obama announced his immigration executive action, an order that the Department of Homeland Security would carry out. Republicans opposed the executive order, and they decided they could leverage the Homeland Security budget against it.

In December they passed a continuing resolution to fund DHS through February (this month), while passing an omnibus bill funding all of the rest of the government through the end of the fiscal year. In DC-speak, this scheme of attaching a continuing resolution with an omnibus bill was called the “CRomnibus” (the plan may or may not have been pastry-inspired).

Overall, Congress has a lot of rules guiding how it sets spending, and it breaks them. All the time

(Cut)

As you can see, Congress walked the money.  Congress controls the purse strings like that. Trump could have vetoed.

Edited by octopus prime
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 Dr. Evil    2,558

Definitely watch sgt's youtube vid for the legals, he lists all the relevant clauses, it's pretty direct, not much waffling, so haven't worried about listing them, if you're interested, invest 20 mins or so.

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 Cinnamon    28,921

Every year, Congress must pass bills that appropriate money for all discretionary government spending. Generally, one bill is passed for each sub-committee of the twelve subcommittees in the U.S. House Committee on Appropriations and the matching 12 subcommittees in the United States Senate Committee on Appropriations.

When Congress does not or cannot produce separate bills in a timely fashion, it will roll many of the separate appropriations bills into one omnibus spending bill.[1]:61 The deadline could be the start of the next fiscal year, October 1, or it could be some other deadline when appropriations would otherwise run out (such as a deadline set by a continuing resolution). The fiscal year of the United States is the 12-month period beginning on October 1 and ending on September 30 of the next calendar year.[2]

Some of the reasons that Congress might not complete all the separate bills include partisan disagreement, disagreement amongst members of the same political party, and too much work on other bills. According to Walter J. Oleszek, a political science professor and "senior specialist in American national government at the Congressional Research Service",[3] omnibus bills have become more popular since the 1980s because "party and committee leaders can package or bury controversial provisions in one massive bill to be voted up or down."[1]:14

Omnibus bills can also be used to "veto-proof" items, by including measures that the president is expected to veto if they were submitted for signature on their own, but who is willing or pressured into signing an omnibus bill that includes those measures.[1

In Congressional Procedures and the Policy Process Oleszek described omnibus measures,[4]

"Packaging all or a number of appropriation bills together creates what are called omnibus or minibus measures. These bills appropriate money to operate the federal government and make national policy in scores of areas. These omnibus bills grant large powers to a small number of people who put these packages together - party and committee leaders and top executive officials. Omnibus measures usually arouse the irk of the rank-and-file members of Congress because typically little time is available in the final days of a session to debate these massive measures or to know what is in them. Absent enactment of annual appropriation bills or a CR, federal agencies must shut down, furloughing their employees. Moreover, "uncertainty about final appropriations leads many [federal] managers to hoard funds; in some cases, hiring and purchasing stops."

— Walter J. Oleszek. Congressional Procedures and the Policy Process. 2010:14

Often, omnibus spending bills are criticized for being full of pork (unnecessary/wasteful spending that pleases constituents or special interest groups).[5]The bills regularly stretch to more than 1,000 pages. Nevertheless, such bills have grown more common in recent years.[1]:14

In December 2004, the 3,016-page $388 billion Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2005 became known for its size, its earmarks inserted in the final stages that represented 4% of the $388, its unrelated provisions, and controversial content and for being rushed through at the last minute; it was drafted by the House in less than 24 hours then pushed through the Senate.[6][7] It contained "complex and controversial matters" which included nine bills, only two of which had been debated in the Senate and a conference report with 32 unrelated provisions that the Senate had never considered.[8]:25267

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omnibus_spending_bill

In 2009, a $410 billion omnibus bill, the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 (H.R. 1105), became a point of controversy due to its $8 billion in earmarks.[9]On March 11, the bill was signed by U.S. President Barack Obama into law as Pub.L. 111–8.[10]

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Xavier   
Xavier

It looks like business as usual.

If they ever arrest anyone of note, I'll remember this post and idea.

But right now, it looks like a War bill and a Zionist dream bill, but what it isn't is a Good for America bill.  That I know.

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 Cinnamon    28,921

Can someone point me to legal proof that Trump can spend this money any way he pleases because it's Omnibus and not a Budget bill? 

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