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Cinnamon

The Link Between Potassium Deficiency and Cancer

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 Cinnamon    28,944

You may have heard of natural medicine maverick Max Gerson, MD, and his pioneering work around cancer and metabolism in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s. 

If so, you may also know that one of the conditions Gerson focused on in preventing and healing cancer was potassium deficiency. Gerson discovered that balanced potassium levels are vital for prevention. Here’s why.

The Importance of the Electrolytes

“Electrolytes” are minerals that have an electrical charge; they will separate into negatively and positively charged ions when dissolved in water.
<snip>

The Cancer-Potassium Deficiency Connection

Gerson noticed that a large percentage of his cancer patients were severely deficient in potassium. This led him and others to inquire about potassium-sodium balance in the body and what this has to do with cancer progression. The answer can be found in how electrolyte imbalance and low potassium levels effect cellular processes.

Research beginning in the 1970’s discovered that when cells are stressed through exposure to toxicity, three things happen. 

First, the cell loses potassium. Second, the cell accepts more sodium. Third, the cell swells with too much water. This is called cellular edema. The result of this is that normal cells lose the ability to generate energy (ATP) in a healthy way. They become vulnerable to mutation—and cancer.

Normal function is turned upside down when cells turn cancerous. Cancer cells do not generate ATP, i.e. energy, in the normal (through balanced mineral input and oxygenation). Instead, they generate their version of energy through consuming glucose in an anaerobic environment.

<snip>

http://humansarefree.com/2018/03/the-link-between-potassium-deficiency.html

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 Cinnamon    28,944
3 minutes ago, Phantom said:

Interesting reading! I know that low potassium is VERY VERY bad for your heart. 

Here's 26 different foods that are high in Potassium, I wasn't really sure about anything but bananas having high potassium levels. 

https://www.algaecal.com/expert-insights/potassium-foods-list/

26 Potassium-Rich Foods List

As you can see, there is a bevy of benefits to regularly consuming foods rich in potassium. The great news is there are loads of fruits and vegetables rich in potassium to help you meet that 4,700 mg daily recommendation. In fact, nature provides a wide variety of potassium-rich foods that will keep you from getting stuck in a food rut and can easily be taken on the go, or stashed in your desk drawer at work. The following are 25 potassium-rich foods to consider, along with their percentage daily value (DV) of potassium:

Potatoes, with Skin (1 potato = 1,081 mg, 23% DV)

Did you know there are over 100 different edible varieties of potatoes? Each variety has many health benefits, so don’t let the no-carb rhetoric deter you from potatoes. Potatoes, namely their peel, are rich in vitamin B6, iron, magnesium, potassium, copper, and vitamin C. The key is to keep the peel and choose a preparation method other than frying.

Give your heart, bones, and taste buds a nutritious, delicious treat by making baked potato skin nachos loaded with black beans, spinach, bell peppers, salsa and sprinkled with cheese. Broil in the oven and then add a dollop of cold yogurt in place of sour cream. Enjoy!

Avocados (1 avocado = 975 mg, 21% DV)

Don’t let the fact that avocados are a high-fat food scare you off from eating one of the healthiest, versatile and delicious foods on earth. Researchers have agreed that the high levels of monounsaturated fatty acids in avocados actually have heart-protecting benefits. An astonishing 15 out of 22 grams of fat in an avocadocomes from monounsaturated fat – that’s 68% of the daily recommendation.

Now that you know the fats in avocados are good for you, you can see all the other benefits they have to offer, such as, but not limited to, the fact that one avocado has over 20% DV of potassium. What’s more, they’re loaded with fiber, magnesium, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and even a dollop of iron. With all those healthy fats and fiber to help keep you full, and the nutrients to help meet your nutritional needs, avocados now look more like a fruit that can help with weight loss than a fattening food.

Use avocados in place of mayo or other unhealthy spreads on sandwiches, wraps and for dipping. Satisfy your sweet tooth by combining an avocado with 2 teaspoons cocoa powder, 1 teaspoon honey and ¼ teaspoon pure vanilla extract. Blend into a creamy mousse and enjoy a nutritious, delicious guilt-free dessert.

Lima Beans (1 cup = 955 mg, 20% DV)

Lima beans, also known as “butter beans” because of their starchy, yet buttery flavor, can be found canned year-round at your local grocery store. In the Southern U.S., butter beans are plentiful from the beginning of summer harvest clear to the end of fall harvest. This potassium-rich food is also high in protein, magnesium, iron, vitamin B6 and even a bit of calcium. If you’re still traumatized from the lima beans served up at school lunch, fret not. Well-prepared Lima beans have a completely different taste and texture. You can also blend a handful into your morning smoothie to lend both nutrition and a creamy texture.

Winter Squash (1 cup = 896 mg, 19% DV)

Winter squash, like the name suggests, is mostly available in the winter. It’s also affordable, delicious and versatile. There are plenty of varieties like butternut, acorn, pumpkin, spaghetti squash and more. Winter squash is known for having a very long shelf life and thus helps a food budget stretch. In addition to the flesh portion of squash, the seeds provide loads of nutrition as well, including potassium! Like pumpkin seeds, you can do the same with winter squash seeds and have a healthy and delicious snack option. Use nutrient-rich spices like chili powder, cinnamon or even a no-salt curry blend to flavor up roasted squash seeds instead of salt.

Sweet Potato, Cooked with Skin (5” sweet potato = 855 mg, 18% DV)

Sweet potatoes are a naturally sweet treat that feels like an indulgence. Brimming with nutrition and endless culinary opportunities, sweet potatoes offer up nutrition both in their peel and in their flesh. Get maximum nutrition by keeping the peel. In addition to one sweet potato offering nearly 20% of a day’s worth of potassium, the deep orange colored flesh contains a bevy of carotenoids, the precursor to vitamin A. Sweet potatoes also offer up 5 B-vitamins – thiamin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B6, niacin, and riboflavin. Grilled, sauteed or even baked, sweet potatoes can add a lot to any meal of the day.

Prunes, AKA Dried Plums (1/2 cup = 637 mg, 14% DV)

Don’t let the reputation of prunes keep you from enjoying these sweet, nutrient-rich, dried plums.  While most commonly touted for their fiber-rich capability to ease constipation, prunes have a lot more to offer nutritionally. Half a cup of prunes provides 637 mg of potassium, and even better, prunes have proven to be a wonderful food choice for bone health, as they have the ability to prevent bone resorption.  

Chewy and sweet, dried plums are a healthy alternative to sugary snacks that happen to provide a lot of nutrition and may even stave off osteoporosis. Talk about a sweet treat with benefits! Just like dried apricots below, dried plums have a higher concentration of nutrients (and antioxidants) after the drying process.

Note: if you still don’t care for prunes- and you’re concerned with your bone density- opt for a natural, plant-based source of potassium that won’t offend your tastebuds. It’s the only food source on earth guaranteed to increase bone density too.

Coconut Water (1 cup = 600 mg, 13% DV)

Have you been curious about the hype surrounding coconut water? It’s showing up more and more on grocery store shelves. Many health and fitness websites mention coconut water and even tout it as the ultimate natural post-workout beverage. Well, there’s something to all that. 1 cup of coconut water provides 600 mg of potassium. It also contains a decent amount of magnesium, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and even iron. Try having a glass of coconut water after a workout, part of your healthy morning routine or during the afternoon to prevent an energy slump.

Brussels Sprouts, Cooked (1 cup = 504 mg, 11% DV)

Commonly known as a side staple during the holidays, brussels sprouts can be a delicious side all year round. These savory cruciferous vegetables are loaded with both flavor and nutrition. 1 cup of cooked brussels sprouts boasts only 56 calories and 504 mg of potassium in addition to bone-nourishing vitamin K, vitamin B6, omega 3 fatty acids, and magnesium. Brussel sprouts can be enjoyed raw, but their flavor profile really shines when cooked. Try them steamed, sauteed, roasted and grilled to see which is your favorite. The answer may be all of the above!

Try this recipe for Balsamic Brussel Sprouts.

Milk (1 cup = 496 mg, 11% DV)

Most commonly known as a calcium-rich food, milk is also a potassium-rich food. When choosing milk, buy organic whenever possible. If you’re looking for a dairy-free alternative, read the label to make sure you’re getting the same nutrients offered in milk, but without toxic food additives. Regardless of whether you choose dairy milk or a dairy substitute, to ensure you get enough calcium, magnesium and trace amount of potassium, make AlgaeCal Plus a part of your daily routine.

Cantaloupe (1 cup = 494 mg, 11% DV)

Cantaloupe is high in vitamin C, vitamin A precursors called carotenoids, and potassium. This sweet, flavorful melon makes a great natural flavor enhancer for water. Cut 4-5 cubes of cantaloupe and place them in your water bottle to sip on during the day. Keep refrigerated unless drinking it and consume within 24 hours to prevent bacterial growth. Sweeten up any green smoothie or vegetable juice naturally by adding cantaloupe. To get the most potassium from cantaloupe, it’s best to eat the fruit in its natural form. This particular melon is a realistic swap for a calorie-laden dessert.

Beets (1 cup = 442 mg, 9% DV)

Beets offer up a lot of nutrition and flavor with very few calories. 1 cup of beets is only 59 calories and yet that same serving offers up loads of potassium, fiber, protein, magnesium, iron and vitamin B6. If consumed raw, beets offer up a healthy dose of vitamin C as well. Beets are deep in color and can be a golden yellow, red or even striped. Golden and striped beets tend to be less sweet than red beets and less earthy in flavor all around. In addition to the beetroot itself, you can also eat the stems and leaves. Try beets raw, roasted, sauteed and even grilled to see how versatile this delicious root vegetable can be.

Fresh Tomatoes (1 cup = 427 mg, 9%) and Tomato Products such as Canned Sauce (1 cup = 909 mg, 19% DV)

Regardless of whether you call it a fruit or vegetable, the mighty tomato is one of the all-around most nutritious foods. 1 cup of fresh chopped tomatoes boasts 427 mg of potassium which is nearly 10% of the recommended 4,700 mg daily. And all that- plus more nutrition- at only 32 calories! Tomatoes are high in vitamin B6, vitamin C, magnesium (if you eat the seeds) and potassium. If you are buying canned tomato products, purchase cans or glass jars that are BPA-free, as the acid content of tomatoes causes BPA plastic to leach out at an even greater rate.

Bananas (1 medium banana = 422 mg, 9% DV)

When it comes to potassium recognition, bananas seem to have covered the market. While actually not the most potassium-rich food available, bananas do pack a healthy dose. 1 medium banana alone has 422 mg of potassium, which is nearly 10% of the daily recommendation of 4,700 mg. Low in price and easy to find all year round, bananas make for a great snack and excellent pre/post workout boost. In addition to being a potassium-rich food, bananas also are high in manganese, vitamin C, and fiber.

Apricots, Dried (10 halves = 407 mg, 9% DV)

During the drying process, heat-sensitive vitamins like vitamin C are affected and are ultimately broken down. This isn’t all bad because other nutrients become more concentrated during this process. Potassium is one of them. While fresh apricots are a perfectly healthy food choice, dried apricots offer the benefit of more potassium per bite, plus prolonged shelf life. That makes dried apricots a viable option for your purse, snack drawer at work or even your workout bag. Be bold and try dried apricots in savory dishes, something that is commonly seen in Persian recipes.

Honeydew Melons (1 cup = 388 mg, 8% DV)

Honeydew melons are as sweet as the name implies. This beautiful green melon offers up a lot of nutrition and flavor at only 61 calories a cup. In addition to a solid amount of potassium, honeydew melon has over half of the daily recommended vitamin C per cup! On top of that, it packs vitamin B6 and fiber. Honeydew is a perfect, refreshing snack or dessert on a hot summer day that can satiate a sweet tooth, help keep you hydrated, and keep your calories in check without making you feel deprived.

Raisins (1.5 ounce box of raisins = 322 mg, 7% DV)

Raisins are dried grapes. You may recognize the red Sun Maid raisin box from your school lunch days, but don’t let childhood lunchtime letdowns keep you from enjoying this sweet, nutrient-rich snack. In fact, raisins have come a long way in recent years and are now available in a wide variety of colors (just like grapes) and significantly better texture. In addition to being a potassium-rich food, raisins are high in fiber, magnesium, and iron. Because they are dried, they have a long shelf life making them perfect for your briefcase, purse or snack drawer at work. It’s up to you whether or not you carry on the tradition of putting them in your children’s lunchboxes.

Yogurt, Plain (½ cup = 290 mg, 6% DV)

Yogurt is a good source of calcium and can be high in probiotics – just check the label. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that provide important health benefits. Probiotics boost the benefits of yogurt well beyond the health benefits of milk because of the fermentation process. Use plain yogurt in place of sour cream and as a base for both sweet and savory dips for fruits and vegetables.

Nectarines (1 nectarine = 287 mg, 6% DV)

The nectarine is closely related to the peach and boasts high amounts of potassium – 287 mg of potassium in just one nectarine. This stone fruit is also rich in vitamin C, B vitamins, and fiber. Throw a few in your work bag for an afternoon snack, add a couple to your breakfast, and change things up by blending them up with some olive oil, herbs, and vinaigrette to use as a dressing or marinade.

Dates, Dried (5 dates = 271 mg, 6% DV)

There are over 30 different types of dates in the world, but the most commonly grown and consumed dates in the U.S. are Medjool dates. Loaded with natural sugar and having a caramel-like consistency and flavor, dates make an excellent replacement for both candies and sugar in recipes. Dates have been a staple of Middle Eastern cuisine for millennia, making it easy to find a variety of interesting, delicious date recipes. Dates offer up a healthy dose of potassium, as well as magnesium, vitamin B6, calcium, iron and even a bit of protein. Talk about a guilt-free sweet treat!

Figs, Dried (2 figs = 271 mg, 6% DV)

While fresh dates are only available during summer harvest season, dried figs can be found at most grocery stores all year long. Dried figs are chewy, sweet and their seeds are crunchy. Those crunchy, edible seeds are where figs get their magnesium content. A serving of figs hovers around 100 calories making them a perfect, sweet snack to satiate your sweet tooth while keeping you on track to meet your target weight. They also offer fiber, copper, calcium, vitamin B6, magnesium, and iron. Figs are a common ingredient in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean dishes and make for a great snack all on their own. 

Pumpkin Seeds (1 oz = 261 mg, 5% DV)

Pumpkin and squash seeds are an excellent source of potassium. One ounce, which is about 85 seeds equals 261 mg of potassium and 74 mg of magnesium. Tossed in salads or granola – these seeds are nutrient powerhouses. 

Peanuts, Dry Roasted & Unsalted (¼ cup = 257 mg, 5% DV)

Peanuts are a nutrition powerhouse. In addition to being a good source of potassium, peanuts are high in biotin, copper, manganese and vitamin B3. They’re also a great source of vegetarian protein. Peanuts are rich in monounsaturated fats and are also a part of the healthy Mediterranean Diet. Read the food label to make sure no toxic food additives or other ingredients have been added.

Oranges (1 orange = 237 mg, 5% DV; 1 cup orange juice = 496 mg, 11% DV)

Oranges are known for high vitamin C content but have so much more to offer nutritionally. These sweet citrus fruits are loaded with potassium, calcium, and fiber as well. Enjoy fresh oranges as a natural sweet treat or try something new by adding them to a cooked, savory dish. If you opt for orange juice, keep the amount in moderation and choose freshly squeezed orange juice. It provides a healthy dose of vitamin C for antioxidant protection and immunity.

Kiwifruit (1 medium kiwi = 215 mg, 5% DV)

Kiwifruit may not win a beauty contest anytime soon, but these delicious fruits prove it’s what is on the inside that matters. Just one kiwifruit has over 100% of the vitamin C a person needs in a day, in addition to potassium, magnesium, calcium and a pinch of iron. When choosing your kiwi, gently apply pressure on the skin. Those that can handle gentle pressure without imploding are the winners with the sweetest taste. Avoid kiwis that are too soft and cave into your pressure. Add sliced kiwi to summer salads for a pop of zesty-sweet flavor, take a couple to the office for afternoon pick-me-ups and bravely add one with its nutrient-rich skin intact to your morning smoothie.

Pears (1 pear = 206 mg, 4% DV)

Pears are a wonderful source of potassium and make for a great afternoon pick-me-up instead of a candy bar. Even the skin offers extra nutrition in the form of phenolic phytonutrients and fiber.  Pears make for a great grab-and-go snack. For a new take on an age-old favorite, try grilling pear halves and sprinkling them with paprika and cayenne pepper.  

Spinach (1 cup raw = 167 mg, 3% DV, 1 cup cooked =  840 mg, 18% DV)

Popeye was onto something with his love of spinach – it really does contain nutrients that help you build strength. 1 cup of raw spinach has 167 mg of bone- and muscle-nourishing potassium and 1 cup cooked spinach contains 840 mg potassium! Cooking spinach doesn’t increase its potassium content, but it drastically shrinks spinach, meaning you get more nutrient-rich spinach per bite.  If you’ve ever added a bag of spinach to a sauté or soup, you’ve seen how quickly and dramatically it can shrink up. Enjoy spinach raw and cooked to get maximum benefits and flavor options.

Spinach is also high in vitamin K1, vitamin A (in the form of carotenoids) and folate. You can steam spinach, add it to pasta or soups or simply sauté with some grass-fed butter (which is high in bone-nourishing vitamin K2) and garlic. Be brave and throw a couple handfuls of raw spinach into your morning smoothie. Spinach actually brings out the flavor of berries while giving you a strong boost of nutrition. The options are endless!

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 Phantom    512
2 hours ago, Cinnamon said:

Here's 26 different foods that are high in Potassium, I wasn't really sure about anything but bananas having high potassium levels. 

https://www.algaecal.com/expert-insights/potassium-foods-list/

26 Potassium-Rich Foods List

As you can see, there is a bevy of benefits to regularly consuming foods rich in potassium. The great news is there are loads of fruits and vegetables rich in potassium to help you meet that 4,700 mg daily recommendation. In fact, nature provides a wide variety of potassium-rich foods that will keep you from getting stuck in a food rut and can easily be taken on the go, or stashed in your desk drawer at work. The following are 25 potassium-rich foods to consider, along with their percentage daily value (DV) of potassium:

Potatoes, with Skin (1 potato = 1,081 mg, 23% DV)

Did you know there are over 100 different edible varieties of potatoes? Each variety has many health benefits, so don’t let the no-carb rhetoric deter you from potatoes. Potatoes, namely their peel, are rich in vitamin B6, iron, magnesium, potassium, copper, and vitamin C. The key is to keep the peel and choose a preparation method other than frying.

Give your heart, bones, and taste buds a nutritious, delicious treat by making baked potato skin nachos loaded with black beans, spinach, bell peppers, salsa and sprinkled with cheese. Broil in the oven and then add a dollop of cold yogurt in place of sour cream. Enjoy!

Avocados (1 avocado = 975 mg, 21% DV)

Don’t let the fact that avocados are a high-fat food scare you off from eating one of the healthiest, versatile and delicious foods on earth. Researchers have agreed that the high levels of monounsaturated fatty acids in avocados actually have heart-protecting benefits. An astonishing 15 out of 22 grams of fat in an avocadocomes from monounsaturated fat – that’s 68% of the daily recommendation.

Now that you know the fats in avocados are good for you, you can see all the other benefits they have to offer, such as, but not limited to, the fact that one avocado has over 20% DV of potassium. What’s more, they’re loaded with fiber, magnesium, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and even a dollop of iron. With all those healthy fats and fiber to help keep you full, and the nutrients to help meet your nutritional needs, avocados now look more like a fruit that can help with weight loss than a fattening food.

Use avocados in place of mayo or other unhealthy spreads on sandwiches, wraps and for dipping. Satisfy your sweet tooth by combining an avocado with 2 teaspoons cocoa powder, 1 teaspoon honey and ¼ teaspoon pure vanilla extract. Blend into a creamy mousse and enjoy a nutritious, delicious guilt-free dessert.

Lima Beans (1 cup = 955 mg, 20% DV)

Lima beans, also known as “butter beans” because of their starchy, yet buttery flavor, can be found canned year-round at your local grocery store. In the Southern U.S., butter beans are plentiful from the beginning of summer harvest clear to the end of fall harvest. This potassium-rich food is also high in protein, magnesium, iron, vitamin B6 and even a bit of calcium. If you’re still traumatized from the lima beans served up at school lunch, fret not. Well-prepared Lima beans have a completely different taste and texture. You can also blend a handful into your morning smoothie to lend both nutrition and a creamy texture.

Winter Squash (1 cup = 896 mg, 19% DV)

Winter squash, like the name suggests, is mostly available in the winter. It’s also affordable, delicious and versatile. There are plenty of varieties like butternut, acorn, pumpkin, spaghetti squash and more. Winter squash is known for having a very long shelf life and thus helps a food budget stretch. In addition to the flesh portion of squash, the seeds provide loads of nutrition as well, including potassium! Like pumpkin seeds, you can do the same with winter squash seeds and have a healthy and delicious snack option. Use nutrient-rich spices like chili powder, cinnamon or even a no-salt curry blend to flavor up roasted squash seeds instead of salt.

Sweet Potato, Cooked with Skin (5” sweet potato = 855 mg, 18% DV)

Sweet potatoes are a naturally sweet treat that feels like an indulgence. Brimming with nutrition and endless culinary opportunities, sweet potatoes offer up nutrition both in their peel and in their flesh. Get maximum nutrition by keeping the peel. In addition to one sweet potato offering nearly 20% of a day’s worth of potassium, the deep orange colored flesh contains a bevy of carotenoids, the precursor to vitamin A. Sweet potatoes also offer up 5 B-vitamins – thiamin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B6, niacin, and riboflavin. Grilled, sauteed or even baked, sweet potatoes can add a lot to any meal of the day.

Prunes, AKA Dried Plums (1/2 cup = 637 mg, 14% DV)

Don’t let the reputation of prunes keep you from enjoying these sweet, nutrient-rich, dried plums.  While most commonly touted for their fiber-rich capability to ease constipation, prunes have a lot more to offer nutritionally. Half a cup of prunes provides 637 mg of potassium, and even better, prunes have proven to be a wonderful food choice for bone health, as they have the ability to prevent bone resorption.  

Chewy and sweet, dried plums are a healthy alternative to sugary snacks that happen to provide a lot of nutrition and may even stave off osteoporosis. Talk about a sweet treat with benefits! Just like dried apricots below, dried plums have a higher concentration of nutrients (and antioxidants) after the drying process.

Note: if you still don’t care for prunes- and you’re concerned with your bone density- opt for a natural, plant-based source of potassium that won’t offend your tastebuds. It’s the only food source on earth guaranteed to increase bone density too.

Coconut Water (1 cup = 600 mg, 13% DV)

Have you been curious about the hype surrounding coconut water? It’s showing up more and more on grocery store shelves. Many health and fitness websites mention coconut water and even tout it as the ultimate natural post-workout beverage. Well, there’s something to all that. 1 cup of coconut water provides 600 mg of potassium. It also contains a decent amount of magnesium, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and even iron. Try having a glass of coconut water after a workout, part of your healthy morning routine or during the afternoon to prevent an energy slump.

Brussels Sprouts, Cooked (1 cup = 504 mg, 11% DV)

Commonly known as a side staple during the holidays, brussels sprouts can be a delicious side all year round. These savory cruciferous vegetables are loaded with both flavor and nutrition. 1 cup of cooked brussels sprouts boasts only 56 calories and 504 mg of potassium in addition to bone-nourishing vitamin K, vitamin B6, omega 3 fatty acids, and magnesium. Brussel sprouts can be enjoyed raw, but their flavor profile really shines when cooked. Try them steamed, sauteed, roasted and grilled to see which is your favorite. The answer may be all of the above!

Try this recipe for Balsamic Brussel Sprouts.

Milk (1 cup = 496 mg, 11% DV)

Most commonly known as a calcium-rich food, milk is also a potassium-rich food. When choosing milk, buy organic whenever possible. If you’re looking for a dairy-free alternative, read the label to make sure you’re getting the same nutrients offered in milk, but without toxic food additives. Regardless of whether you choose dairy milk or a dairy substitute, to ensure you get enough calcium, magnesium and trace amount of potassium, make AlgaeCal Plus a part of your daily routine.

Cantaloupe (1 cup = 494 mg, 11% DV)

Cantaloupe is high in vitamin C, vitamin A precursors called carotenoids, and potassium. This sweet, flavorful melon makes a great natural flavor enhancer for water. Cut 4-5 cubes of cantaloupe and place them in your water bottle to sip on during the day. Keep refrigerated unless drinking it and consume within 24 hours to prevent bacterial growth. Sweeten up any green smoothie or vegetable juice naturally by adding cantaloupe. To get the most potassium from cantaloupe, it’s best to eat the fruit in its natural form. This particular melon is a realistic swap for a calorie-laden dessert.

Beets (1 cup = 442 mg, 9% DV)

Beets offer up a lot of nutrition and flavor with very few calories. 1 cup of beets is only 59 calories and yet that same serving offers up loads of potassium, fiber, protein, magnesium, iron and vitamin B6. If consumed raw, beets offer up a healthy dose of vitamin C as well. Beets are deep in color and can be a golden yellow, red or even striped. Golden and striped beets tend to be less sweet than red beets and less earthy in flavor all around. In addition to the beetroot itself, you can also eat the stems and leaves. Try beets raw, roasted, sauteed and even grilled to see how versatile this delicious root vegetable can be.

Fresh Tomatoes (1 cup = 427 mg, 9%) and Tomato Products such as Canned Sauce (1 cup = 909 mg, 19% DV)

Regardless of whether you call it a fruit or vegetable, the mighty tomato is one of the all-around most nutritious foods. 1 cup of fresh chopped tomatoes boasts 427 mg of potassium which is nearly 10% of the recommended 4,700 mg daily. And all that- plus more nutrition- at only 32 calories! Tomatoes are high in vitamin B6, vitamin C, magnesium (if you eat the seeds) and potassium. If you are buying canned tomato products, purchase cans or glass jars that are BPA-free, as the acid content of tomatoes causes BPA plastic to leach out at an even greater rate.

Bananas (1 medium banana = 422 mg, 9% DV)

When it comes to potassium recognition, bananas seem to have covered the market. While actually not the most potassium-rich food available, bananas do pack a healthy dose. 1 medium banana alone has 422 mg of potassium, which is nearly 10% of the daily recommendation of 4,700 mg. Low in price and easy to find all year round, bananas make for a great snack and excellent pre/post workout boost. In addition to being a potassium-rich food, bananas also are high in manganese, vitamin C, and fiber.

Apricots, Dried (10 halves = 407 mg, 9% DV)

During the drying process, heat-sensitive vitamins like vitamin C are affected and are ultimately broken down. This isn’t all bad because other nutrients become more concentrated during this process. Potassium is one of them. While fresh apricots are a perfectly healthy food choice, dried apricots offer the benefit of more potassium per bite, plus prolonged shelf life. That makes dried apricots a viable option for your purse, snack drawer at work or even your workout bag. Be bold and try dried apricots in savory dishes, something that is commonly seen in Persian recipes.

Honeydew Melons (1 cup = 388 mg, 8% DV)

Honeydew melons are as sweet as the name implies. This beautiful green melon offers up a lot of nutrition and flavor at only 61 calories a cup. In addition to a solid amount of potassium, honeydew melon has over half of the daily recommended vitamin C per cup! On top of that, it packs vitamin B6 and fiber. Honeydew is a perfect, refreshing snack or dessert on a hot summer day that can satiate a sweet tooth, help keep you hydrated, and keep your calories in check without making you feel deprived.

Raisins (1.5 ounce box of raisins = 322 mg, 7% DV)

Raisins are dried grapes. You may recognize the red Sun Maid raisin box from your school lunch days, but don’t let childhood lunchtime letdowns keep you from enjoying this sweet, nutrient-rich snack. In fact, raisins have come a long way in recent years and are now available in a wide variety of colors (just like grapes) and significantly better texture. In addition to being a potassium-rich food, raisins are high in fiber, magnesium, and iron. Because they are dried, they have a long shelf life making them perfect for your briefcase, purse or snack drawer at work. It’s up to you whether or not you carry on the tradition of putting them in your children’s lunchboxes.

Yogurt, Plain (½ cup = 290 mg, 6% DV)

Yogurt is a good source of calcium and can be high in probiotics – just check the label. Probiotics are healthy bacteria that provide important health benefits. Probiotics boost the benefits of yogurt well beyond the health benefits of milk because of the fermentation process. Use plain yogurt in place of sour cream and as a base for both sweet and savory dips for fruits and vegetables.

Nectarines (1 nectarine = 287 mg, 6% DV)

The nectarine is closely related to the peach and boasts high amounts of potassium – 287 mg of potassium in just one nectarine. This stone fruit is also rich in vitamin C, B vitamins, and fiber. Throw a few in your work bag for an afternoon snack, add a couple to your breakfast, and change things up by blending them up with some olive oil, herbs, and vinaigrette to use as a dressing or marinade.

Dates, Dried (5 dates = 271 mg, 6% DV)

There are over 30 different types of dates in the world, but the most commonly grown and consumed dates in the U.S. are Medjool dates. Loaded with natural sugar and having a caramel-like consistency and flavor, dates make an excellent replacement for both candies and sugar in recipes. Dates have been a staple of Middle Eastern cuisine for millennia, making it easy to find a variety of interesting, delicious date recipes. Dates offer up a healthy dose of potassium, as well as magnesium, vitamin B6, calcium, iron and even a bit of protein. Talk about a guilt-free sweet treat!

Figs, Dried (2 figs = 271 mg, 6% DV)

While fresh dates are only available during summer harvest season, dried figs can be found at most grocery stores all year long. Dried figs are chewy, sweet and their seeds are crunchy. Those crunchy, edible seeds are where figs get their magnesium content. A serving of figs hovers around 100 calories making them a perfect, sweet snack to satiate your sweet tooth while keeping you on track to meet your target weight. They also offer fiber, copper, calcium, vitamin B6, magnesium, and iron. Figs are a common ingredient in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean dishes and make for a great snack all on their own. 

Pumpkin Seeds (1 oz = 261 mg, 5% DV)

Pumpkin and squash seeds are an excellent source of potassium. One ounce, which is about 85 seeds equals 261 mg of potassium and 74 mg of magnesium. Tossed in salads or granola – these seeds are nutrient powerhouses. 

Peanuts, Dry Roasted & Unsalted (¼ cup = 257 mg, 5% DV)

Peanuts are a nutrition powerhouse. In addition to being a good source of potassium, peanuts are high in biotin, copper, manganese and vitamin B3. They’re also a great source of vegetarian protein. Peanuts are rich in monounsaturated fats and are also a part of the healthy Mediterranean Diet. Read the food label to make sure no toxic food additives or other ingredients have been added.

Oranges (1 orange = 237 mg, 5% DV; 1 cup orange juice = 496 mg, 11% DV)

Oranges are known for high vitamin C content but have so much more to offer nutritionally. These sweet citrus fruits are loaded with potassium, calcium, and fiber as well. Enjoy fresh oranges as a natural sweet treat or try something new by adding them to a cooked, savory dish. If you opt for orange juice, keep the amount in moderation and choose freshly squeezed orange juice. It provides a healthy dose of vitamin C for antioxidant protection and immunity.

Kiwifruit (1 medium kiwi = 215 mg, 5% DV)

Kiwifruit may not win a beauty contest anytime soon, but these delicious fruits prove it’s what is on the inside that matters. Just one kiwifruit has over 100% of the vitamin C a person needs in a day, in addition to potassium, magnesium, calcium and a pinch of iron. When choosing your kiwi, gently apply pressure on the skin. Those that can handle gentle pressure without imploding are the winners with the sweetest taste. Avoid kiwis that are too soft and cave into your pressure. Add sliced kiwi to summer salads for a pop of zesty-sweet flavor, take a couple to the office for afternoon pick-me-ups and bravely add one with its nutrient-rich skin intact to your morning smoothie.

Pears (1 pear = 206 mg, 4% DV)

Pears are a wonderful source of potassium and make for a great afternoon pick-me-up instead of a candy bar. Even the skin offers extra nutrition in the form of phenolic phytonutrients and fiber.  Pears make for a great grab-and-go snack. For a new take on an age-old favorite, try grilling pear halves and sprinkling them with paprika and cayenne pepper.  

Spinach (1 cup raw = 167 mg, 3% DV, 1 cup cooked =  840 mg, 18% DV)

Popeye was onto something with his love of spinach – it really does contain nutrients that help you build strength. 1 cup of raw spinach has 167 mg of bone- and muscle-nourishing potassium and 1 cup cooked spinach contains 840 mg potassium! Cooking spinach doesn’t increase its potassium content, but it drastically shrinks spinach, meaning you get more nutrient-rich spinach per bite.  If you’ve ever added a bag of spinach to a sauté or soup, you’ve seen how quickly and dramatically it can shrink up. Enjoy spinach raw and cooked to get maximum benefits and flavor options.

Spinach is also high in vitamin K1, vitamin A (in the form of carotenoids) and folate. You can steam spinach, add it to pasta or soups or simply sauté with some grass-fed butter (which is high in bone-nourishing vitamin K2) and garlic. Be brave and throw a couple handfuls of raw spinach into your morning smoothie. Spinach actually brings out the flavor of berries while giving you a strong boost of nutrition. The options are endless!

Excellent and helpful Cinnamon!  My own personal heart issues are partially linked to the sodium / potassium levels.

I was told by my doctor to lower my sodium intake, I did. After 2 months my heart was actually worse!!! Crazy palpitations and an unstable blood pressure! 

Against medical advice I increased my sodium... AND massively increased my potassium and its worked! Underlying issues are still there but potassium is the good guy here! 

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 Cinnamon    28,944
1 hour ago, Phantom said:

Excellent and helpful Cinnamon!  My own personal heart issues are partially linked to the sodium / potassium levels.

I was told by my doctor to lower my sodium intake, I did. After 2 months my heart was actually worse!!! Crazy palpitations and an unstable blood pressure! 

Against medical advice I increased my sodium... AND massively increased my potassium and its worked! Underlying issues are still there but potassium is the good guy here! 

I was reading something about lack of sodium causing heart issues, I don't know if it was you that mentioned that here or not but someone did. I think most doctors are basically useless except for trauma doctors, the ones who practice on you for disease don't seem to care about food much unless you need to lose or gain weight. The nutritional aspect seems lost on them. I treat them like I do my car dealership, I get the car put on the rack, get the paperwork from the dealership and go to a mechanic down the street to fix the car. Use their diagnosis for info and figure out how to treat yourself. Some things that are age old diseases they can do something for people, like diabetes and insulin, but I think for the most part they're just doing what those did before them whether it worked or even made people sicker. I don't know any sick people who are getting well unless they make a concerted effort to change food and do exercise. 

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 Moosupian    70
Posted (edited)

My water for when I work out is 1 liter with 1/5th teaspoon potassium chloride, 1/4th teaspoon pink Himalayan salt and 1/4 teaspoon Epson salt. Be very careful if you use potassium chloride (salt substitute). Too much will send you heart into arrhythmia and if you are not in top aerobic conditioning you can die. (About 2 teaspoons of potassium chloride in a day)

4600 mg in a teaspoon

52.45% of KCL is K

1 tsp. of potassium chloride 2413mg Potassium

At any big store, the water softener department, you can pick up 10 lifetime supplies of potassium chloride in a 40# bag for about $10. Just need to crush down the big chunks to powder (2 flat granite blocks smashin' inside an 18 GL plastic tub)

Edited by Moosupian
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 Moosupian    70

The three-legged stool of the sodium-potassium pump. You get this out of balance and you invite everything bad possible and not yet having happened to anyone on the planet as of yet but you'll be the 1st. Search engine "sodium-potassium pump".

1. 8 glasses of good water

2. 2.5 grams of sodium

3. 4.5 grams of potassium

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