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Cinnamon

green onions planted/ experiment

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 Cinnamon    24,852

I usually grow green onions in a pot from seed. It takes a long time to sprout them and then there's always a lot of thinning. 

Anyway, I read this article that said you can cut the ends off green onions you buy at the store, they have roots on them and put them in soil and they will grow. After going through 3 bunches of these things that I bought at the store in the past couple of weeks.. they don't cost that much but why buy them if I don't have to. 

I cut the ends off a bunch tonight and put them in pots. They had quite a lot of roots on them. 

Think they'll grow? Have you tried doing that?  You can also do this with leaf lettuces, too, according to them. 

My climate is such that you can grow all year.

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 love>fear    26

i used the organic ones I got from the sore.  chopped and used the greens, soaked roots in water and was able to get 2 other greens to grow out before I had to plant in soil for nutrients.  Only words of caution, don't use tap water, and change it often (daily) as to make sure the roots of the plants don't get mushy.  

Works for tons of veggies and other plants.  I transplant my indoor spider plant, by doing cutting into water and planting later after roots develop.  I have done that with a lot of plants, trees, scrubs... look at grafting plants online

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 Cinnamon    24,852
1 minute ago, love>fear said:

i used the organic ones I got from the sore.  chopped and used the greens, soaked roots in water and was able to get 2 other greens to grow out before I had to plant in soil for nutrients.  Only words of caution, don't use tap water, and change it often (daily) as to make sure the roots of the plants don't get mushy.  

Works for tons of veggies and other plants.  I transplant my indoor spider plant, by doing cutting into water and planting later after roots develop.  I have done that with a lot of plants, trees, scrubs... look at grafting plants online

I have some apple trees that are grafted. I got 3 apples in 3 years. lol Imma starve to death! 

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 love>fear    26

seems like they are might be taking a little longer than they should.  Depends on the apple type and conditions of soil.  We planted new apple tress in WA state on our property and it took about 3 years to get even a few apples.  Damn dear ate them all once they started to come in around year 5.

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 phxsparks    1,020
19 minutes ago, Cinnamon said:

I usually grow green onions in a pot from seed. It takes a long time to sprout them and then there's always a lot of thinning. 

Anyway, I read this article that said you can cut the ends off green onions you buy at the store, they have roots on them and put them in soil and they will grow. After going through 3 bunches of these things that I bought at the store in the past couple of weeks.. they don't cost that much but why buy them if I don't have to. 

I cut the ends off a bunch tonight and put them in pots. They had quite a lot of roots on them. 

Think they'll grow? Have you tried doing that?  You can also do this with leaf lettuces, too, according to them. 

My climate is such that you can grow all year.

I remember planting small onion bulbs when I was a kid.  My Dad showed me how and then supervised the planting.

They sprouted in the garden and by late summer we had great big juicy sweet onions.

Please let me know how this is working in a few weeks.  I'm quite interested.   :happy:

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 Cinnamon    24,852
18 minutes ago, phxsparks said:

I remember planting small onion bulbs when I was a kid.  My Dad showed me how and then supervised the planting.

They sprouted in the garden and by late summer we had great big juicy sweet onions.

Please let me know how this is working in a few weeks.  I'm quite interested.   :happy:

I'll let you know. It was kind of nice that it rained the past couple of days and the soil in the pots was nice and damp from rainwater. These are the skinny green onions that don't make a big bulb, but there have been plenty of times I wished I had some and would have to go to the store and get them if I wanted them, if this works, I won't! :) 

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 Cinnamon    24,852
23 minutes ago, love>fear said:

seems like they are might be taking a little longer than they should.  Depends on the apple type and conditions of soil.  We planted new apple tress in WA state on our property and it took about 3 years to get even a few apples.  Damn dear ate them all once they started to come in around year 5.

I love apples! And yeah, the deer can do a lot of damage!  I'm in a desert type setting. I probably didn't water them enough but we've been on water restrictions for a few years now. My mandarin orange tree is loaded and that's free and delish breakfast every morning when I wake up. Yumm!  

The apples at the store (and tomatoes) have zero taste unless they're organic. So, I pay the price for them because otherwise I don't even want to eat them. 

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 love>fear    26

I know what you mean I am in AZ now, since 2000-ish.  I have seen my citrus die and the new ones didn't come back.  Water restrictions make it almost impossible grow food or take care of your yard.  I know most don't want to hear this but... that is exactly the point.  There have been a tons of laws to restrict crop production on an individual level.  I am not allowed to have a front yard garden. 

* Look into the soil bacteria for better nutrition to your plants and veggies.  Most are lacking or are unable to absorb the proper nutrients because of the soil composition. 

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 Cinnamon    24,852
2 minutes ago, love>fear said:

I am not allowed to have a front yard garden. 

Shades of Zimbabwe! People were starving and they stopped letting people grow food around their houses. You must be in a place with land restrictions or an HOA?  I got so lucky when I got this place, no one can afford to annex it and it's in a small piece of land that's in an unincorporated area. One less layer of government and I'm in the mountains, hardly any "authority" types come up here unless someone calls them up here. Except the dog catchers tryna make money off unlicensed poochies. 

I grow everything in my front yard. lol Okra, beans, tomatoes, peas, whatever I can get to live. I'm going to ignore their water restrictions this year, I want to try for a bigger bunch of food, so meh on them.

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 phxsparks    1,020
36 minutes ago, Cinnamon said:

I'll let you know. It was kind of nice that it rained the past couple of days and the soil in the pots was nice and damp from rainwater. These are the skinny green onions that don't make a big bulb, but there have been plenty of times I wished I had some and would have to go to the store and get them if I wanted them, if this works, I won't! :) 

I hope it works, because I would like to do the same thing this spring.  I think if you look around you can probably find lots of different onion bulbs and no doubt you can have them shipped to you.  See how it goes with the onions from the grocery store.

The other thing I learned about onions and many other veges is you need really rich fertile soil.  Go to the garden center and get a bag of manure.  Yeah, I know it stinks, put it outside somewhere don't take it into the house.  Do not use ammonium nitrate based fertilizer on onions or radishes etc.  It will make them very nasty tasting.  Ever eat a radish that was really hot and burned your mouth?  Ammonium nitrate was used to fertilize the radish. 

 

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 love>fear    26
5 minutes ago, Cinnamon said:

Shades of Zimbabwe! People were starving and they stopped letting people grow food around their houses. You must be in a place with land restrictions or an HOA?  I got so lucky when I got this place, no one can afford to annex it and it's in a small piece of land that's in an unincorporated area. One less layer of government and I'm in the mountains, hardly any "authority" types come up here unless someone calls them up here. Except the dog catchers tryna make money off unlicensed poochies. 

I grow everything in my front yard. lol Okra, beans, tomatoes, peas, whatever I can get to live. I'm going to ignore their water restrictions this year, I want to try for a bigger bunch of food, so meh on them.

I am not, but I know a lot of people that are.  Getting worse all over.  Last great depression 95% of people grew some of their own food if not most, now it is down to around 5%.  I am still trying to get my neighbor to stop spending money spray his yard to kill "weeds", they are actually a herb if they even knew.  

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 phxsparks    1,020
43 minutes ago, Cinnamon said:

I'll let you know. It was kind of nice that it rained the past couple of days and the soil in the pots was nice and damp from rainwater. These are the skinny green onions that don't make a big bulb, but there have been plenty of times I wished I had some and would have to go to the store and get them if I wanted them, if this works, I won't! :) 

I love to cook food, the smaller green onions are usually sweeter and have more flavor and less bite.

I would go with the smaller onions, if for no reason but the flavor of the food they will be used in.

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