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Alluvial

Fresh warnings over 'The Big One' as study finds seafloor sediments off the Pacific Northwest could unleash a megaquake AND a tsunami

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 Alluvial    540
  • Study found megaquake may be more likely off Washington, northern Oregon
  • Sediments off shore of the area are more compact, with potential for more stress
  • This could lead to a major earthquake, followed by a devastating tsunami 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5101461/Seafloor-sediments-ingredients-Big-One.html#ixzz4z7p8WZ9k
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The threat of ‘The Big One’ has long loomed over the Pacific Northwest, where several major cities from Vancouver down to northern California are cradled by the 620-mile-long Cascadia Subduction Zone.

The geological record shows the area is due for a major earthquake, which would likely be followed by a massive tsunami.

Now, a new study has confirmed the region just off the coast of Washington has the ingredients for a megaquake.

Researchers found that such a quake may be more likely to strike off the coast of Washington and northern Oregon than regions further south along the subduction zone. Seismic data and sediment samples found that sediments are tightly packed on the plate off the northern sites

The Cascadia Subduction Zone last experienced a large earthquake in the 1700s – and, it’s thought to generate a major event roughly every 200 to 530 years.

While it’s impossible to pinpoint the exact timing, experts have long warned the region could soon see another major quake.

In the study, led by a team at the University of Texas at Austin, researchers found that such a quake may be more likely to strike off the coast of Washington and northern Oregon than regions further south along the subduction zone.

Seismic data and sediment samples found that sediments are tightly packed on the plate off the northern sites.

There, little water sits in the pore spaces between the grains, leaving the plates more prone to the build-up of stress.

Under these conditions, the sediments are better able to stick together, and move together in the event of an earthquake – meaning they’re also able to move massive amounts of seawater.

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 DAVE632    34

Jan. 28th 1700 as recorded by the Japanese 6,000 miles away across the Pacific where it produced the same size/power Tsunami as the 9.1 Daichi quake 150 miles off shore. Think about that.

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 Malevolent    2,823

A powerful, 4.6 magnitude quake 13 miles northeast of Gonzales, along the San Andreas Fault, was the largest to strike the region.

The San Andreas Fault – a 750-mile fissure that runs the length of California – is thought to be long overdue a “Big One” earthquake measuring magnitude 7 or greater.

Since last week, a whopping 134 earthquakes within three miles of that 4.6 tremor were recorded, USGS said.

 

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