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CGK

Lets Look Inside The Mind Of A Gambler-Turned Mass Murderer!

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 CGK    2,586
Posted (edited)

There is a common theme in every news report about Stephen Paddock, he was a "Professional Gambler" and so was his girlfriend Marilou Danley.

Most stories say something like he was a High Roller and move along. The fact that everyone who knows the man has confirmed he is a big time gambler is the most important fact that people seems to dismiss. You want a motive? He was a gambler!

Having been around people with a gambling problem for most of my life I can speak to this problem with some authority.  I also lived in Las Vegas for 10 years back in the "Mob" days and knew plenty of people who claimed to be "Professional Gamblers."  Quite a few of those people are most likely buried in the Nevada Desert by now.

Addicted gamblers are very sick people. Its a mental illness that is not discussed much in America but the addiction is as real as being addicted to Meth. Maybe even worse because being a Meth addict is hard to hide whereas a gambling addiction is not obvious to the casual observer.

Paddock was a high roller. That designation in Las Vegas gets a lot of ass kissing from Pit Bosses and hotel employees. You get free rooms, food, front row seats to shows, free airfare, all sorts of goodies. People bend over backwards to keep the high rollers happy so they continue spending money.

Las Vegas was not built on winners therefore anyone who throws large amounts of money around in a casino is treated like Royalty. Eventually all the money they win will be given back to the house if the Casino can keep in house and entertained long enough.

Paddock was a gambler who kept searching for a bigger thrill, a higher high and most likely got into a situation way over his head.

Maybe his girlfriend Marilou the "High Stakes Hostess" introduced him to some "Asians" most likely Chinese that dangled a carrot he couldn't resist. Probably a money laundering scheme or at least that is what I suspect. Things got too hot, he went nuts and decided to go out in a blaze of glory or he was the patsy that took the fall because "Dead Men Tell No Lies"

Lets look at problem gambling and where it can lead to. This is a great article that pretty much sums it all up.

https://www.elementsbehavioralhealth.com/addiction/stages-of-compulsive-gambling/

 

Compulsive or pathological gambling is a progressive illness, a psychological disorder which is just as difficult to overcome as addiction to alcohol or drugs. The compulsive gambler experiences a series of stages, each with its own warning signs. While the number of stages varies from 3 to 5, depending on the source, all are similar in the first three. This article discusses the 5 stages, since that is the most complete. Note that not all compulsive gamblers will experience all of the phases, as they may give up before the final one. In addition, here we will refer to the action compulsive gambler, primarily male, as opposed to an escape problem gambler, primarily female.

<snip>

Hopelessness

There is yet another negative phase in the stages of compulsive gambling. And, yes, it does get worse. You’d think it couldn’t possibly be worse than the desperation phase, but the difference is that in the hopeless phase, the action compulsive gambler completely loses all hope. He just gives up, not caring any longer whether he lives or dies.

In fact, he wishes he were dead, and may make one or more attempts at suicide at this point, if he has not already done so. If not ending their actual life, many action compulsive gamblers in the final throes of stage four resort to activities that cause them to become incarcerated. In this way, they’ve taken themselves out of the equation – they can no longer do harm to others if they’re in prison.

Having lost all hope, the action compulsive gambler believes that there is no hope left. No one cares and all is lost. For many action compulsive gamblers, the fourth phase is the final phase. They either die or go to jail.

Edited by CGK

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 CGK    2,586

How the Brain Gets Addicted to Gambling

<snip>

Addictive drugs and gambling rewire neural circuits in similar ways

In the past, the psychiatric community generally regarded pathological gambling as more of a compulsion than an addiction—a behavior primarily motivated by the need to relieve anxiety rather than a craving for intense pleasure. In the 1980s, while updating the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the American Psychiatric Association (APA) officially classified pathological gambling as an impulse-control disorder—a fuzzy label for a group of somewhat related illnesses that, at the time, included kleptomania, pyromania and trichotillomania (hairpulling). In what has come to be regarded as a landmark decision, the association moved pathological gambling to the addictions chapter in the manual's latest edition, the DSM-5, published this past May. The decision, which followed 15 years of deliberation, reflects a new understanding of the biology underlying addiction and has already changed the way psychiatrists help people who cannot stop gambling.

<snip>

Research to date shows that pathological gamblers and drug addicts share many of the same genetic predispositions for impulsivity and reward seeking. Just as substance addicts require increasingly strong hits to get high, compulsive gamblers pursue ever riskier ventures. Likewise, both drug addicts and problem gamblers endure symptoms of withdrawal when separated from the chemical or thrill they desire. And a few studies suggest that some people are especially vulnerable to both drug addiction and compulsive gambling because their reward circuitry is inherently underactive—which may partially explain why they seek big thrills in the first place.

Even more compelling, neuroscientists have learned that drugs and gambling alter many of the same brain circuits in similar ways. These insights come from studies of blood flow and electrical activity in people's brains as they complete various tasks on computers that either mimic casino games or test their impulse control. In some experiments, virtual cards selected from different decks earn or lose a player money; other tasks challenge someone to respond quickly to certain images that flash on a screen but not to react to others.

A 2005 German study using such a card game suggests problem gamblers—like drug addicts—have lost sensitivity to their high: when winning, subjects had lower than typical electrical activity in a key region of the brain's reward system. In a 2003 study at Yale University and a 2012 study at the University of Amsterdam, pathological gamblers taking tests that measured their impulsivity had unusually low levels of electrical activity in prefrontal brain regions that help people assess risks and suppress instincts. Drug addicts also often have a listless prefrontal cortex.

More: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-the-brain-gets-addicted-to-gambling/

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 CGK    2,586

And considering the fact that Paddocks father was a bank robber, career criminal from CHICAGO (Home of the Mafia) it only makes sense that Stephen wanted his name to go down in History just like Daddy. The apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

When you think about mass murderers, for example the Columbine guys, Harris and Klebold just wanted to be famous too.

When all hope is lost...why not go out with a bang?

Im not saying that there is not a whole lot more to this story but to me its as simple as Occams Razor.

 

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 God Man    312

That explains the current climate and culture in this country.  These days everything is a gamble: the stock market, housing market, keeping money in the bank, attending a music concert, driving to work, and on and on.

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 CGK    2,586
Just now, God Man said:

That explains the current climate and culture in this country.  These days everything is a gamble: the stock market, housing market, keeping money in the bank, attending a music concert, driving to work, and on and on.

I agree to an extent but gamblers, especially poker players are a different breed.

Back when I lived in Las Vegas I viewed poker players as the scum of the earth. They would come by the pool at my apartment complex bragging about how they had the high hand, won a big pot were rolling in the money. At the end of the month those very same Winners were looking to borrow money from everyone to pay their rent.

Poker is not gambling don't ya know? Its a skill, an art, its a game only the brilliant ones play. Professional poker players can tell you what the odds are for this hand or that hand. They watch their fellow players looking for tells. They think they can read people like books.

Im not clear on the fact if Paddock only played video poker or table games too. I suspect he did both.

If it was only video poker I'm sure he thought he worked out a algorithm as to when the royal flushes would pay. Problem is with electronic machines, the house is in control of when the machines pay off and how often.

Like I said earlier, Las Vegas WAS NOT BUILT ON WINNERS. Anyone who thinks they can beat the system is a fool!

Paddock was a fool in more ways than one!

 

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 CGK    2,586

What did I just say...gamblers only talk about their winnings...not their losses! If you win over 10 grand and cash in at the cage in LV you have to fill out a form so that your winnings can be reported to the IRS.

FBI agents investigating this case knows if he was a winner. They just don't know how much he might have lost.

Melbourne, Florida, resident Don Judy told CNN that Paddock had owned a property next to him from 2013-2015.

He said Paddock 'was a gambler and a speculator' who gave them keys to the home and asked them to keep an eye on it, since he wouldn't be around much.

'He told us that [he was a gambler] right up front, since he was from Vegas,' Judy said.

'He did a little online gambling and he also did it in Vegas. And that was one reason he was going back and forth to keep the gambling going, and he did it online here.'

When Paddock was in the Florida home, he was rarely seen because he was up all night gambling, Judy said. 

Judy's wife added that he once showed her a photo of a slot machine on which he'd won $20,000.

Eric said Paddock had done a similar thing with him, showing him a photo of a $40,000 slot machine win. 

He also said that his brother had enjoyed playing high-stakes poker with $100 hands.

Eric didn't know whether his brother was suffering financial issues or had gambling debts and speculated that he could lose $1 million and still have enough to live on.

Paddock also had two planes registered to his name.

But in the weeks before his meticulously planned and terrifying attack, Paddock had gambled more than $10,000 a day - sometimes even more than $30,000 - in Las Vegas casinos.

In total, he gambled with at least $160,000 in the past few weeks, insiders told NBC

More: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4943140/Did-gambling-debts-drive-Las-Vegas-gunman-murder.html

 

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 God Man    312

It does seem odd that he gambled so much and claimed to make a profit at it.  He played video poker and there is no way someone could win over an extended period of time unless they had a fix.  There are many possibilities. 

I met someone once that played $100. a pull slot machines all the time in Reno and Vegas and he was comped very well by the casino's with huge Suites, airfare, entertainment and food just like this guy.  It was nothing to him though as he had a ton of money from a national chain of tire stores.  Losing $50,000-$100,000 over a weekend was no big deal to him and was probably like an average person buying a lottery ticket.

Also, a casino could be used by the CIA to transfer money to somebody that is secretly working for them that they don't want traced back to them.  Maybe some machines could be altered to pay out winners more frequently to the point where you would win if you played for many hours. 

Something just came to mind.  The Sheriff said in the news conference that the players card he was using to play was not his card.  - What does this mean and why did he release that detail?

Anyway, there is so much that we don't know and may never no for sure.

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 CGK    2,586
Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, God Man said:

It does seem odd that he gambled so much and claimed to make a profit at it.  He played video poker and there is no way someone could win over an extended period of time unless they had a fix.  There are many possibilities. 

I met someone once that played $100. a pull slot machines all the time in Reno and Vegas and he was comped very well by the casino's with huge Suites, airfare, entertainment and food just like this guy.  It was nothing to him though as he had a ton of money from a national chain of tire stores.  Losing $50,000-$100,000 over a weekend was no big deal to him and was probably like an average person buying a lottery ticket.

Also, a casino could be used by the CIA to transfer money to somebody that is secretly working for them that they don't want traced back to them.  Maybe some machines could be altered to pay out winners more frequently to the point where you would win if you played for many hours. 

Something just came to mind.  The Sheriff said in the news conference that the players card he was using to play was not his card.  - What does this mean and why did he release that detail?

Anyway, there is so much that we don't know and may never no for sure.

I think he was using Marilou's card but I dont know why.

Las Vegas has changed so much in the past 30 years. No more one armed bandits where you pull the handle on a manual slot machine and silver dollars actually fall into bowl at the bottom of the machine. Back in those days, payoffs where manually set at night when they came through and collected the coins. Now its all done digitally and most likely wireless. Ive been out of the game for too many years to know what goes on now.

The one thing I'm sure of is that the corruption and money laundering has never left town. It just got more sophisticated.

I suspect that Paddock was an addicted gambler who got caught up in something he had no way out of.

Its very difficult for the CT community to wrap their heads around the fact that maybe someone just went nuts in LV. I wanted to believe that there is some deep dark conspiracy here and there might be, but knowing what I know and living in that city for so many years I think this might be simple.

I think he got involved with the wrong people, maybe the Chinese mafia laundering money,  got in way over his head, because he thought he was smarter than most people, got caught skimming from his handlers and decided to go out in a blaze of glory.

He had no wife or kids to worry about. Nothing to live for..And gamblers blame everyone else for their problems. All those concert goes are the very people who have taken his money at one point or another..or so he thought.

Its hard for people to wrap their heads around the fact that some people are just plain evil and snap.

If you take the time to look into the mind of a deranged self professed professional gambler the "snapped theory" is not so far fetched.

Edited by CGK

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