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Darkness10001

F**k Technology These Days. Shove It Up Your A**

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 Cinnamon    21,560
1 minute ago, Blipkints said:

LOL Don't feel bad, I have no clue what's going on and I've only been offline for less than 24 hours. Stuff moves to fast to store it all in brain cells. 

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 Cinnamon    21,560
4 minutes ago, Blipkints said:

What for?

Putting up new poles, but they neglected to tell anyone that they were doing it and shut off power for almost 15 hours! 

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 Eagles fan    242
15 hours ago, Darkness10001 said:

I am a millenial in my 20's

 

Dont have a cell phone or smart phone, smart TV, stupid retarded smart watch, dont have anything is  "smart".

 

Hell dont even have a credit card... I pay cash for EVERYTHING

Im an old school guy, i hate everything that is modern. Once i save enough money (technically i already have enough, just have to wait for the collapse), i am leaving this shithole suburb and moving far away from everyone in the rural area. Away from technology, and those stupid fking cell towers. I am going to make sure my land is surrounded by mountains so those stupid cell reception wont each my home.

 

This is also a big F U C K   YOU to Apple Who released the new Iphone X that has facial recognition technology. I hope those brain-dead slaves enjoy the prison (agenda 21 and 22) you are soon going to be living in... Hell, they even released the new apple watch 3 that has cell reception, not only these apple slaves will get genitalia cancer from their cell phone, but also arm cancer and other forms of cancer. Good riddance if you ask me.

 

 

 

You're way ahead of the game. I use a trac phone. It costs me about 4$ a month. I buy minutes as needed and I rarely use it. I have never and will never own a droid. I'm just not into walking into poles...

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 Darth Synder    103
15 hours ago, Ukshep said:

Ok with a neighbor? have a few mile between us?

Can't we all pool our resources together and do this for real? 

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 Ukshep    18,649
11 minutes ago, Darth Synder said:

Can't we all pool our resources together and do this for real? 

Right now I doubt we would have the people. But I'll tell you what if this forum ever grew. I'd seriously think about laying the foundations for such a thing.

However nothing to stop people from pooling together here. I'd encourage that. But obviously that is risky. Crazy peoples all over etc. So best to build bonds and go slow.

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 Eagles fan    242
Just now, Ukshep said:

Right now I doubt we would have the people. But I'll tell you what if this forum ever grew. I'd seriously think about laying the foundations for such a thing.

I mention this site a lot to people that are starting to really see what's going on. We need to get the word out!

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 Ukshep    18,649
8 minutes ago, Eagles fan said:

I mention this site a lot to people that are starting to really see what's going on. We need to get the word out!

It's appreciated and since word of mouth is all we have since the goolag and others dislike truth. It really is down to all of us.

Communities are formed slowly over time :) 

Dictatorship force themselves upon the world. :(

You know which we are :p  I hope lol!

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 levinyl    22
18 hours ago, Darkness10001 said:

I am a millenial in my 20's

 

Dont have a cell phone or smart phone, smart TV, stupid retarded smart watch, dont have anything is  "smart".

 

Hell dont even have a credit card... I pay cash for EVERYTHING

Im an old school guy, i hate everything that is modern. Once i save enough money (technically i already have enough, just have to wait for the collapse), i am leaving this shithole suburb and moving far away from everyone in the rural area. Away from technology, and those stupid fking cell towers. I am going to make sure my land is surrounded by mountains so those stupid cell reception wont each my home.

 

This is also a big F U C K   YOU to Apple Who released the new Iphone X that has facial recognition technology. I hope those brain-dead slaves enjoy the prison (agenda 21 and 22) you are soon going to be living in... Hell, they even released the new apple watch 3 that has cell reception, not only these apple slaves will get genitalia cancer from their cell phone, but also arm cancer and other forms of cancer. Good riddance if you ask me.

 

 

 

You do have a point , but you are only in your 20's  - Most of what you had when you were growing up is still available today - phones, internet, tv's = I for one find tech a great thing and very helpful making longer tasks now much shorter. Id understand more if you were like 40-50 

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 grav    512
12 hours ago, IamMeYouareYou said:

I grew up, living in the southwestern part of Indiana. They called it busrowbottom, had no running water in the cabin, actually it was a three room house, kitchen, living room with a pot belly stove, and one bedroom. Had an outhouse (two stall) (hole) with a deep pit, filled with muddaubers, and wasp. They didn't bother you if you didn't bother them, just ignore them. Walked 1/2 mile down a lane to catch the school at 7:15am, rain or shine. So in essence I grew up in what you yearn for, it was great, no neighbors for 3 miles, would go the Jim's grocery store 9 miles away, and mom would  buy $25.00 worth of supplies that would last a month. This was in the 50's early 60's, in 67, selective service put me in the military, there I saw my first black man, discover the dial phone, this is when I started my education. Where I came from was no picnic, but I was never happier. It all started my real education in 1967, I never hated anyone, but I learned quickly, whom not to socialize with. 

Good luck with your endeavors, there is truth in the words "You can return, but you can never go home again" I doubt some could overcome the tribulations.

I'm your age, born at home on a high ridge in western Pennsylvania, not far from Punxsutawney. We had an outhouse and a kitchen sink which provided water from a hand crank pump. We were poor but so was everyone else. When I was 5 or 6 we moved to New Orleans. Talk about culture shock. On the road down, we saw blacks working in cotton fields. Not many lived in the city back then. I walked to school by myself until my little sister was old enough to go with me. We traveled a lot for Dad's job. He ran a crew of pile drivers who built concrete piers for bridges. So I attended 15 schools before I graduated. We lived everywhere on the east coast, from Rhode Island to Florida to Indiana. Everywhere was different and the same. Safe, peaceful, lots of wild lands to explore by myself and friends. Everything is so "developed" now, thanks to urban sprawl. My husband and I wanted none of that and live in the boonies. The Yuppie hordes are spreading this way, unfortunately, with their manicured lawns and McMansions. So we may have to eventually relocate to Mississippi, waaaay away from everyone. I'd rather live with wolves as neighbors instead of some of the two-legged varmints we have too close for comfort. Speaking of, here is my favorite piece of lit, which I lovingly think of as Green Fire. 

Quote

http://www.eco-action.org/dt/thinking.html

Thinking Like a Mountain 

By Aldo Leopold

A deep chesty bawl echoes from rimrock to rimrock, rolls down the mountain, and fades into the far blackness of the night. It is an outburst of wild defiant sorrow, and of contempt for all the adversities of the world. Every living thing (and perhaps many a dead one as well) pays heed to that call. To the deer it is a reminder of the way of all flesh, to the pine a forecast of midnight scuffles and of blood upon the snow, to the coyote a promise of gleanings to come, to the cowman a threat of red ink at the bank, to the hunter a challenge of fang against bullet. Yet behind these obvious and immediate hopes and fears there lies a deeper meaning, known only to the mountain itself. Only the mountain has lived long enough to listen objectively to the howl of a wolf.

 

Those unable to decipher the hidden meaning know nevertheless that it is there, for it is felt in all wolf country, and distinguishes that country from all other land. It tingles in the spine of all who hear wolves by night, or who scan their tracks by day. Even without sight or sound of wolf, it is implicit in a hundred small events: the midnight whinny of a pack horse, the rattle of rolling rocks, the bound of a fleeing deer, the way shadows lie under the spruces. Only the ineducable tyro can fail to sense the presence or absence of wolves, or the fact that mountains have a secret opinion about them.

 

My own conviction on this score dates from the day I saw a wolf die. We were eating lunch on a high rimrock, at the foot of which a turbulent river elbowed its way. We saw what we thought was a doe fording the torrent, her breast awash in white water. When she climbed the bank toward us and shook out her tail, we realized our error: it was a wolf. A half-dozen others, evidently grown pups, sprang from the willows and all joined in a welcoming melee of wagging tails and playful maulings. What was literally a pile of wolves writhed and tumbled in the center of an open flat at the foot of our rimrock.

 

In those days we had never heard of passing up a chance to kill a wolf. In a second we were pumping lead into the pack, but with more excitement than accuracy: how to aim a steep downhill shot is always confusing. When our rifles were empty, the old wolf was down, and a pup was dragging a leg into impassable slide-rocks.

 

We reached the old wolf in time to watch a fierce green fire dying in her eyes. I realized then, and have known ever since, that there was something new to me in those eyes - something known only to her and to the mountain. I was young then, and full of trigger-itch; I thought that because fewer wolves meant more deer, that no wolves would mean hunters' paradise. But after seeing the green fire die, I sensed that neither the wolf nor the mountain agreed with such a view.

 

Since then I have lived to see state after state extirpate its wolves. I have watched the face of many a newly wolfless mountain, and seen the south-facing slopes wrinkle with a maze of new deer trails. I have seen every edible bush and seedling browsed, first to anaemic desuetude, and then to death. I have seen every edible tree defoliated to the height of a saddlehorn. Such a mountain looks as if someone had given God a new pruning shears, and forbidden Him all other exercise. In the end the starved bones of the hoped-for deer herd, dead of its own too-much, bleach with the bones of the dead sage, or molder under the high-lined junipers.

 

I now suspect that just as a deer herd lives in mortal fear of its wolves, so does a mountain live in mortal fear of its deer. And perhaps with better cause, for while a buck pulled down by wolves can be replaced in two or three years, a range pulled down by too many deer may fail of replacement in as many decades. So also with cows. The cowman who cleans his range of wolves does not realize that he is taking over the wolf's job of trimming the herd to fit the range. He has not learned to think like a mountain. Hence we have dustbowls, and rivers washing the future into the sea.

 

We all strive for safety, prosperity, comfort, long life, and dullness. The deer strives with his supple legs, the cowman with trap and poison, the statesman with pen, the most of us with machines, votes, and dollars, but it all comes to the same thing: peace in our time. A measure of success in this is all well enough, and perhaps is a requisite to objective thinking, but too much safety seems to yield only danger in the long run. Perhaps this is behind Thoreau's dictum: In wildness is the salvation of the world. Perhaps this is the hidden meaning in the howl of the wolf, long known among mountains, but seldom perceived among men.

 

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