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Cinnamon

I'm expanding my garden space

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 Cinnamon    20,036

My front yard is on a slope and there's a retaining wall at the end. I'm filling that in with garden soil. I don't know what to plant there, but in Cali it's time for winter gardens and I have never really grown one. I think I have time to get tomatoes if I use the fast growing smaller one. I hate tomatoes from the store unless they are organic and my apples have to be organic, too. No smell, no taste and they are both that way. 

Anyway, I will have an area about 18 feet long and 4 feet wide. I want to grow brussel sprouts and broccoli. Anyway, any suggestions. It usually doesn't freeze in winter here. 

I like growing things that keep producing, not a one time pick and its gone. 

 

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 The Gent    829

I have a little bit more to do on mine (16x12 roughly)...I'm planting garlic, onions, lettuce, potatoes and spinach (my choices) but there are several other choices as well. Local nursery's usually have DIY books or pamphlets with lots of good info....sure the web does as well.

But with that said, I have to say "Good For You"  as gardening should be something every generation should know!

:clap1:

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 dazedb42    282

Try and grow luxury items that you wouldn't always buy in the stores. It's pointless to fill your garden up with say carrots when they cost c/lb. I'm not sure what your diet is like but winter is best for leafy greens, peas, broccoli, cauliflower and root vegetables. Radishes are easy and quick, garlic and the alliums will grow ok too.

Remember when planting to put the tallest plants to the north side of the garden as to not shade smaller plants. 

Also remind yourself that a cold wind dries plants out just as well as a a hot one so keep an eye on water. Mulch well and stay on top of pests. Always check withholding periods if you have to use chemicals but most of all use it as a learning experience for next year. 

Have fun.

 

 

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 Ukshep    17,196

This thread has been moved to the Survival & Health Forum!

For more information on why? Check out our page on what topics go where! As part of our quality control measures!

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 LuckyBolt    1,179

3 dwarf fruit trees spaced out (make sure they are self pollinating).  Plant peas in a circle around them to help fix nitrogen and they will use the trees as a trellis. Intermix radish, spinach and/or purple orach (perennial), carrots, jerusalem artichokes, lettuce, parsley or other herbs.

Brussel and broccoli take up a bunch of space and are more cost effective to buy in the fall.  Early purple sprouting broccoli is fun to grow.

 

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 phxsparks    706
7 hours ago, dazedb42 said:

Try and grow luxury items that you wouldn't always buy in the stores. It's pointless to fill your garden up with say carrots when they cost c/lb. I'm not sure what your diet is like but winter is best for leafy greens, peas, broccoli, cauliflower and root vegetables. Radishes are easy and quick, garlic and the alliums will grow ok too.

Remember when planting to put the tallest plants to the north side of the garden as to not shade smaller plants. 

Also remind yourself that a cold wind dries plants out just as well as a a hot one so keep an eye on water. Mulch well and stay on top of pests. Always check withholding periods if you have to use chemicals but most of all use it as a learning experience for next year. 

Have fun.

 

 

Potatoes can be grown in a barrel filled with rich soil.  It does not take up a lot of space and the potatoes are tasty.

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 dazedb42    282
3 minutes ago, phxsparks said:

Potatoes can be grown in a barrel filled with rich soil.  It does not take up a lot of space and the potatoes are tasty.

They can, where I am from they are also one the highest demanding crops for chemicals too.

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 Condor    917

Do et Cin!!! 

I have more lettuce that I know what to do with and zucchini the size of by forearm.   :gsbrnint:

Just waiting for the California Reaper peppers to come in.  :bananafire:

8 hours ago, Cinnamon said:

I hate tomatoes from the store unless they are organic and my apples have to be organic, too.

 

I am blessed to have a local farm called the Red Barn supply me with ginormous tomatoes.  Mine kind of suck this year, soil needs help. 

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Depending on where you are in the world, in North America, it's getting too late to plant a lot of things. Now is the time to plant some fall lettuce, some stuff like turnips/parsnips. Where I live, we've been getting a freeze the week before Thanksgiving the past 4 years. So when I plant in August, I plant stuff that will have time to mature... Cabbage, kohlrabi, turnips. I've had turnips and beets over winter as well a few times. 

If you have a green house, or the ability to build/buy a small one, I'd use that for some fresh herbs during the winter. Nothing beats having fresh oregano, basil(though I grow that in my kitchen) tarragon, etc. 

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 Cinnamon    20,036
On 8/8/2017 at 0:33 AM, dazedb42 said:

Try and grow luxury items that you wouldn't always buy in the stores. It's pointless to fill your garden up with say carrots when they cost c/lb. I'm not sure what your diet is like but winter is best for leafy greens, peas, broccoli, cauliflower and root vegetables. Radishes are easy and quick, garlic and the alliums will grow ok too.

Remember when planting to put the tallest plants to the north side of the garden as to not shade smaller plants. 

Also remind yourself that a cold wind dries plants out just as well as a a hot one so keep an eye on water. Mulch well and stay on top of pests. Always check withholding periods if you have to use chemicals but most of all use it as a learning experience for next year. 

Have fun.

 

 

heh I tried growing radishes in the summer here, over 108 all the time and I actually got a few of them, but not like it said on the package.

I have to figure out something that keeps on producing, hate pulling it out and it's all done. Maybe I can try some pomegranate bushes, I see them growing everywhere around here. Peas are good, too. I have tons of kale growing, I think it's impervious to just about everything.

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 FredoIsSmart    512
On 8/8/2017 at 0:33 AM, dazedb42 said:

Try and grow luxury items that you wouldn't always buy in the stores. It's pointless to fill your garden up with say carrots when they cost c/lb. I'm not sure what your diet is like but winter is best for leafy greens, peas, broccoli, cauliflower and root vegetables. Radishes are easy and quick, garlic and the alliums will grow ok too.

Remember when planting to put the tallest plants to the north side of the garden as to not shade smaller plants. 

Also remind yourself that a cold wind dries plants out just as well as a a hot one so keep an eye on water. Mulch well and stay on top of pests. Always check withholding periods if you have to use chemicals but most of all use it as a learning experience for next year. 

Have fun.

 

 

^ I recently started regrowing my green onions indoors. Once the green tops are almost gone, I put the roots in a cup of water and leave them on my window sill. In 2-3 days, new green onions will start to grow. Works great! I do something similar with tomatoes. Once they start going soft, I cut up a few slices and cover them up with some dirt in a small bucket. Takes longer but still works great.

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 Cinnamon    20,036
2 hours ago, FredoIsSmart said:

^ I recently started regrowing my green onions indoors. Once the green tops are almost gone, I put the roots in a cup of water and leave them on my window sill. In 2-3 days, new green onions will start to grow. Works great! I do something similar with tomatoes. Once they start going soft, I cut up a few slices and cover them up with some dirt in a small bucket. Takes longer but still works great.

Do you put the green onions in dirt, too? 

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