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Ukshep

Huge 'Dead Zone' In Gulf of Mexico Is Bigger Than Ever at Over 8,776 Square Miles

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 Ukshep    20,202

Right now, in the depths of the Gulf of Mexico, lies an area the size of New Jersey that's so oxygen-deprived it's void of almost all marine life.

The so-called "dead zone" isn't a new phenomenon: It appears in the Gulf, and other bodies of water, every summer. But what makes this year's Gulf dead zone unique is its magnitude: At 8,776 square miles, it's the largest ever since tracking began in 1985, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced this week.

Its size is projected to affect local fishing economies and is raising questions over the amount of pollutants that flow into our water — particularly nutrients from excessive use of nitrogen fertilizers.

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/environment/why-years-dead-zone-gulf-mexico-bigger-ever-n789636?cid=sm_npd_nn_tw_ma

:( Death everywhere!

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 dazedb42    383

More ecotard propaganda.

The war on energy must continue comrades. We will have our socialist utopia and then we can kill all the useless goys.

http://www.houmatoday.com/news/20141230/new-species-found-in-gulf-of-mexico

Don't let the narrative fail comrades.

Quote

A study released earlier this month uncovered 107 new species of organisms living in deep water areas of the Gulf of Mexico.

A study released earlier this month uncovered 107 new species of organisms living in deep water areas of the Gulf of Mexico.
While the majority of discoveries were microscopic, the findings are providing scientists with knowledge of communities more than a half mile below the surface on the ocean floor. 
“It’s a terrific finding for science,” said Paul Sammarco with the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium in Chauvin. “It helps the understanding of the evolution of organisms.“
The report, “Investigations of Chemosynthetic Communities on the Lower Continental Slope of the Gulf of Mexico,” involved researchers reaching areas previously unstudied by using submarines. A manned vehicle, Alvin, and the remotely operated Jason II were used on excursions in 2006 and 2007, with four sites studied at length. 
Some of the bigger organisms discovered were new species of tube worms, a marine invertebrate that can reach up to 6 feet long and live up to 100 years, said Gregory Boland, biological oceanographer with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management.

The interesting thing is most of these organisms eat hydrocarbons.

Quote

Communities of organisms using chemosynthesis are living near hydrocarbon seeps, or areas in the oceanic crust leaking oil and gas, to create energy even with a lack of sun. In this instance, organisms are using the hydrocarbons to create energy.
“They can metabolize those forms of carbon,” Sammarco said. “You and I eat vegetables and meat and potatoes and we metabolize those forms of carbon and protein. They can actually utilize the petroleum hydrocarbons themselves for energy.“

 

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 Cinnamon    23,111

Didn't the Corexit cause the oil to go to the bottom? I remember reading that somewhere. 

The organisms need to eat a lot faster. 

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How deep is the water?

Engineering students from The University of Sydney have devised a scheme to produce reactive nitrogen for fertilization of the ocean from an OTEC plant. They claim that “Each floating structure could stimulate the growth of 370,000 tonnes of sardines a year, enough protein for three million people, at a cost of $US400 a tonne, or eight cents per person per day.” The University of Sydney News has a recent article about it and also one from January. ... http://www.otecnews.org/locations/australia/

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 The Gent    865
18 minutes ago, Cinnamon said:

Didn't the Corexit cause the oil to go to the bottom? I remember reading that somewhere. 

The organisms need to eat a lot faster

The Unapproved, Untested CorrectIT killed them as well! :gsbrnint:

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 JayDee    1,292

Also, from what I've heard, the lack of hurricanes in the gulf (due to geoengineering) is causing stratification, which is bad for ocean life, and is most likely contributing to this problem. 

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 Ukshep    20,202
1 hour ago, The Gent said:

The Unapproved, Untested CorrectIT killed them as well! :gsbrnint:

This sadly...

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 kbet    844
9 hours ago, dazedb42 said:

More ecotard propaganda.

The war on energy must continue comrades. We will have our socialist utopia and then we can kill all the useless goys.

http://www.houmatoday.com/news/20141230/new-species-found-in-gulf-of-mexico

Don't let the narrative fail comrades.

The interesting thing is most of these organisms eat hydrocarbons.

 

What has this to do with energy? It has to do with destructive corporate farming practices.

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 dazedb42    383
29 minutes ago, kbet said:

What has this to do with energy? It has to do with destructive corporate farming practices.

Ethanol production? 

Only 50% of Nitrogen runoff is from farming. I did assume it was just another attempt to ban oil production from the gulf again though.

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 kbet    844
1 hour ago, dazedb42 said:

Ethanol production? 

Only 50% of Nitrogen runoff is from farming. I did assume it was just another attempt to ban oil production from the gulf again though.

Sounds like they need to build expansive water treatment facilities along the Mississippi River, and the Mississippi Delta to clean it before it reaches the gulf. A shame to let good nitrogen be wasted, and cause detrimental effects in the environment.

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 dazedb42    383
Just now, kbet said:

Sounds like they need to build expansive water treatment facilities along the Mississippi River, and the Mississippi Delta to clean it before it reaches the gulf. A shame to let good nitrogen be wasted, and cause detrimental effects in the environment.

You just need culverts along the sides of fields to trap runoff before they hit the river systems but yeah, it is shoddy farming practices. A massive waste of money to be over fertilizing fields. 

 

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