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Ukshep

'It was like a mini-Katrina': Shaken New Orleanians overwhelmed by Saturday's sudden flooding

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 Ukshep    17,196

http://www.theadvocate.com/new_orleans/news/environment/article_53f362f6-7aba-11e7-92f1-574dc11582bd.html

Janine Hayes was working her shift at the Port of Call restaurant on Esplanade Avenue, at the edge of the French Quarter, when the deluge started Saturday afternoon.

She and her co-workers noticed the water was pooling faster than it does in a typical summer storm. Alarmed, they started keeping a closer watch. And during one of these periodic checks, a co-worker saw something worrisome — some kind of black apparatus in the water.

A closer look revealed the unidentified item was a wheelchair. In it was a paralyzed man, struggling to keep his head above water. 

"It was crazy," Hayes said, adding that several waiters and others ran outside immediately to help. 

"It took all their strength to get that man’s face out of the water and lift the whole apparatus up and get him up on the dry sidewalk," she added. "And he was crying."

PTSD Is a horrible thing! That's what this is!

 

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 The Gent    829
4 minutes ago, Ukshep said:

Janine Hayes was working her shift at the Port of Call restaurant on Esplanade Avenue, at the edge of the French Quarter, when the deluge started Saturday afternoon.

She and her co-workers noticed the water was pooling faster than it does in a typical summer storm. Alarmed, they started keeping a closer watch. And during one of these periodic checks, a co-worker saw something worrisome — some kind of black apparatus in the water.

A closer look revealed the unidentified item was a wheelchair. In it was a paralyzed man, struggling to keep his head above water. 

"It was crazy," Hayes said, adding that several waiters and others ran outside immediately to help. 

"It took all their strength to get that man’s face out of the water and lift the whole apparatus up and get him up on the dry sidewalk," she added. "And he was crying."

PTSD Is a horrible thing! That's what this is!

Flooding or flash-flooding has been getting easier & easier down here these days. Been in this area since the 60's and the last decade I seen places flood that never use to...it makes you stop & take notice, that's a fact. Just a little over 73 miles SSW from the Big Sleazy. 

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 Cinnamon    20,036
2 hours ago, The Gent said:

Flooding or flash-flooding has been getting easier & easier down here these days. Been in this area since the 60's and the last decade I seen places flood that never use to...it makes you stop & take notice, that's a fact. Just a little over 73 miles SSW from the Big Sleazy. 

Do you know why that is? 

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 The Gent    829
22 minutes ago, Cinnamon said:

Do you know why that is? 

Ah..to hear some It's due to progress, poorly planned infrastructures, others say weather patterns and seasonal normal's have changed (I can concur with that), some older folk can tell you that this area or that area was higher when they were young, that the land is either sinking or sea levels have risen and the storms & surges are more intense...I know how things are these days in the gulf states, compared to how they were growing up here...15 years ago I shared a 1200 acre Hunting Lease near the Miss. River basin with a nice camp....No longer there today, nothing but about 2000 acres of water_____erosion they say!

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 GT500    1,400

Surprised it's still open 

they had great gumbo 

wouldn't it be nice to take a trip down to NOLA 

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 Cinnamon    20,036
29 minutes ago, The Gent said:

Ah..to hear some It's due to progress, poorly planned infrastructures, others say weather patterns and seasonal normal's have changed (I can concur with that), some older folk can tell you that this area or that area was higher when they were young, that the land is either sinking or sea levels have risen and the storms & surges are more intense...I know how things are these days in the gulf states, compared to how they were growing up here...15 years ago I shared a 1200 acre Hunting Lease near the Miss. River basin with a nice camp....No longer there today, nothing but about 2000 acres of water_____erosion they say!

I guess things change, but 15 years isn't very long to see that much happen. Amazing. 

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 The Gent    829
1 hour ago, Cinnamon said:

I guess things change, but 15 years isn't very long to see that much happen. Amazing. 

heavier flood waters & snow melt from up north on the Miss/Ohio river, hurricanes (the really nasty ones) and out-dated floodgate & spillway designs have most likely been the major factor for basin & coast land becoming wetlands, but like I said, here lately places- including places that never been flooded, are flooding easier & more often the last few years...and many have notice.

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