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China Moves Tons of Military Equipment to Area of Border Dispute with India

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15 minutes ago, Ukshep said:

Holy shit he was right....

 

Hmm....

The chances he was bullshitting and this is a coinicidence? 

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1 minute ago, JayDee said:

Hmm....

The chances he was bullshitting and this is a coinicidence? 

Could be moderate. Hints could have been put out in alt media..he could have seen it and worked it in. Who knows though!

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6 minutes ago, ESET said:

As well here almost month ago

 

I forgot about that. Then Boondock's post (or whoever he is) isn't quite prophetic..yet. 

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Good article explaining situation there

China has demanded the withdrawal of Indian troops from a scrap of disputed territory to end an escalating border row between the two Asian powers that has drawn in tiny Bhutan.

Beijing claims the Indian troops are occupying its soil, but both Bhutan and India maintain the area in question is Bhutanese territory.

Analysts maintain that armed conflict between the two Asian powers is unlikely, but say the harsh language and scale of the mobilisation in the remote but strategically important area, where the borders of China, India and Bhutan intersect, is unprecedented in recent years.

One former Indian foreign secretary said the impasse, now in its third week, also marked the first time India and China had squared off on the soil of a third country, an overt display of the escalating regional rivalry between the pair.

The current standoff began on 16 June when a column of Chinese troops accompanied by construction vehicles and road-building equipment began moving south into what Bhutan considers its territory.

Bhutan, a small Himalayan kingdom with close military and economic ties to India, requested assistance from Delhi, which sent forces to resist the Chinese advance.

To avoid escalation, frontline troops in the area do not generally carry weapons, and the Chinese and Indian troops reportedly clashed by “jostling”: bumping chests, without punching or kicking, in order to force the other side backwards.

At the heart of the dispute are different interpretations of where the “trijunction” – the point where the three countries’ borders meet – precisely lies. China argues its territory extends south to an area called Gamochen, while India says Chinese control ends at Batanga La, further to the north.

About 3,000 troops from both countries are reportedly stationed near Doka La , an area initial media reports said was about 15km from Gamochen, but which satellite imagery shows could be as close as two to three kilometres away.

In support of its claim, China points to an 1890 treaty signed with the British Raj, and seemingly endorsed by India’s first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, in a letter to his Chinese counterpart. India says the letter does not accurately capture Nehru’s position and that China cannot unilaterally alter the territorial status quo.

It is the longest standoff between the two armies since 1962, when tensions over Tibet and elsewhere along the border sparked a brief war from which China emerged victorious.

China still claims a section of the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh and was angered in April when the Dalai Lama, whom Beijing regards as an “anti-China separatist”, conducted a tour of the state.

Though India says its troops in Bhutan are in “non-combative mode”, the rhetoric on both sides is growing increasingly pugilistic. India’s army chief, Bipin Rawat, has said that India is ready to fight a “two and half front war” – referring to Pakistan, China and against the country’s various internal insurgencies.

On Tuesday, an editorial in the Global Times, a Chinese state-run newspaper, called for Delhi to be taught “a bitter lesson”, warning in a second conflict it would suffer greater losses than in 1962.

Srikanth Kondapalli, a professor of Chinese Studies at Jawaharlal Nehru University in Delhi, said he believed the standoff would “die down in a little while”, arguing neither country wanted to fight a full-blown war.

“No one is willing to rock the boat, despite all that we have seen,” he said. Rather, as it does in the south China sea, he said Beijing was employing a “salami-slicing” strategy, patiently absorbing small swaths of territory it considers to be its own.

Global attention is usually focused on China’s expansion into east Asia, but the burgeoning superpower is increasingly also muscling into south Asia, forging links with countries India considers to be firmly within its sphere of influence.

“For the past six years China has been attempting to hem India in and take away its strategic space in South Asia,” said Ashok Malik, a fellow at the Delhi-based Observer Research Foundation.

India was especially sensitive to China’s encroachment near its Bhutanese border, he said, because it brought Chinese troops uncomfortably close to a section of Indian territory called the “chicken’s neck”, a thin corridor which, if broached, could cut Delhi off from its northeastern states.

“This is in fact a provocative gesture which makes the defence of Doklam virtually the defence of India,” Malik said. “I don’t expect a conflict, but I expect both sides to stay put as long as Chinese supply and logistical lines will allow.”

 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jul/06/china-india-bhutan-standoff-disputed-territory

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5 minutes ago, Ukshep said:

Could be moderate. Hints could have been put out in alt media..he could have seen it and worked it in. Who knows though!

Yeah, it's interesting timing with dahboo's report. But given that the region has been in dispute for a little while, wouldn't take much to play on that. He may have paid attention to it while most of us forgot/didnt know. 

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Don´t forget recent visit from India´s PM to Isreal.

China is "stone in the shoe" for many nations.

Potential war on korean peninsula or against India could stop China in progression of building "One belt, one road"

Follow the money.

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I been telling ya that India and China are going to war. China needs the experience to fine tune their military operations. That way they can take on the USA. India and China have been in a tiff for a while now. First move was when China built some buildings on the border area disputed strip they are arguing about. Nothing was done and they are still there. India just screams about it. But now China is trying to move their little road through there. And they are claiming that area. It's a mess but been in the works for a little while now. A couple years at least. It's heating up really fast. 

It's why I was saying the ME is done with now. Syria is a mop up operation. China and India are going to war and Pakistan will jump in on China's side. Russia is arming both sides. The USA is arming India. 

India is starting to demand China release Tibet. And they are going to make that a sticking point with China. 

China is going to war. With India. They are long time foes. 

China's goal is to replace the USA as the top dog. ;) But they are not ready to challenge the USA. 2025? 

We need Russia on our side. Russia will also take a lot of pain if it sides with us against China. They have a long border with China. China is not so sure of Russia. They moved some military stuff up there and they claimed it was not for Russia. I forget all the details but they moved some weapon system to the Russia border.. Trump was in office or campaigning when they did it. They are probably the ones that are behind all the Russia crap really. They want Russia on their side just like we want them on our side. ;) 

China's making some big moves on the chessboard. China is starting to push their weight around on other countries. They have been building up their military for over 20 years now. They are ready and willing to start a war. And India is the one they picked. 

As a lot of things come from China... What is going to happen when they go to war with India? Will they close down some factories that make junk they sell to other countries? Will they convert some of their factories to war time factories? How is mainland China going to respond to war? 

If you think about it... a small war with India would set them up both militarily and domestically to manufacture the war materials. So they would already be in a position to continue supplying their war machine after that war is over. And then they will have the experience they need and the supplies to take on the USA. They are training and getting ready to take over their little part of the world and ocean. They want to control it all. They lie and say they don't but their actions prove differently. 

India and China are going to war. Take that to the bank and cash it. It's a good check. :nodl:

Edited by sybdragon
dang spelling :(

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Lessons from history of China-India conflict:

+snip+

In 1962, India moved troops into remote valleys high on the eastern Himalayas claimed by China. Beijing proclaimed it would “teach India a lesson.”

It certainly did. Marching over the high mountains, Chinese troops quickly outflanked static Indian forces — as they did with American troops in Korea in 1950. The Indians were routed. The People’s Liberation Army took much of Arunachal Pradesh, and stood before tea-producing Assam, only a relatively short distance to Calcutta.

Satisfied by his “lesson,” Chairman Mao ordered his troops to withdraw.

Proud India was humiliated and deeply shocked. Since then, India has built up its forces in the region to over three army corps of 100,000 mountain troops, backed by high-altitude air bases and a network of new roads and supply depots.

The long, poorly demarcated border has been tense ever since. India claims two large chunks of territory in the west held by China: Aksai Chin and a slice of Kashmir given by Pakistan to China to allow a military road connecting Tibet with Chinese Xinjiang. I have explored both frozen wastelands, both over 15,000 vertiginous feet.

China claims most of Indian-held Arunachal Pradesh on the eastern end of the Himalayan border, known as the McMahon line. India has only grudgingly accepted China’s 1950 takeover of Tibet and has harbored anti- Chinese groups dedicated to liberating the mountain kingdom. At the same time, India quietly asserted control of two other Himalayan mountain kingdoms, Bhutan and Sikkim. India sees the growing array of Chinese bases in Tibet as an extreme danger. China’s air, missile and intelligence bases in Tibet look down on the vast plains of India.

India’s leader, Jawaharlal Nehru, once complained of this danger to China’s Premier Chou Enlai. Chou laughed and retorted, “If I wanted to destroy India, I would march 100 million Chinese to the edge of the Tibetan plateau and order them to piss downhill. We would wash you into the Indian Ocean.”

Tibet controls most of the headwaters of India’s great rivers. Delhi has long feared that China may one day dam and divert their waters to China’s dry western provinces.

Other serious potential flashpoints exist. India’s old foe, Pakistan, with whom it has fought four wars, is China’s closet ally. Beijing arms Pakistan and has built up its nuclear arms program. An Indian-Pakistan war over divided Kashmir, or an Indian intervention in a fragmenting Pakistan or Afghanistan, could draw China into the fray. A new port in western Pakistan at Gwadar will give China port rights on the Arabian Sea.

Burma (today Myanmar), on India’s troubled eastern flank, which is rent by tribal uprisings, deeply worries Delhi. Strategic Burma is rapidly becoming an important forward Chinese base. A new road links China with Burma, and provides China’s navy a badly needed port on the Andaman Sea, and thus access to the Indian Ocean.

India believes China is trying to strategically encircle it. To the west, Pakistan; to the north, Tibet; to the east, Burma. To the south, China is busy cultivating Sri Lanka.

In spite of million man armed forces and nuclear weapons, India feels increasingly threatened by China’s rise. The Indians know full well that China expects obedience from its neighbors. Even a small border clash between these two assertive giants could light the fuse of a broad and very frightening conflict. The scramble for oil and gas offers ample causes of yet more conflict in Central Asia and even the Gulf, where today America’s rules supreme.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/eric-margolis/china-and-india-a-war-of_b_699687.html

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4 hours ago, sybdragon said:

I been telling ya that India and China are going to war. China needs the experience to fine tune their military operations. That way they can take on the USA. India and China have been in a tiff for a while now. First move was when China built some buildings on the border area disputed strip they are arguing about. Nothing was done and they are still there. India just screams about it. But now China is trying to move their little road through there. And they are claiming that area. It's a mess but been in the works for a little while now. A couple years at least. It's heating up really fast. 

It's why I was saying the ME is done with now. Syria is a mop up operation. China and India are going to war and Pakistan will jump in on China's side. Russia is arming both sides. The USA is arming India. 

India is starting to demand China release Tibet. And they are going to make that a sticking point with China. 

China is going to war. With India. They are long time foes. 

China's goal is to replace the USA as the top dog. ;) But they are not ready to challenge the USA. 2025? 

We need Russia on our side. Russia will also take a lot of pain if it sides with us against China. They have a long border with China. China is not so sure of Russia. They moved some military stuff up there and they claimed it was not for Russia. I forget all the details but they moved some weapon system to the Russia border.. Trump was in office or campaigning when they did it. They are probably the ones that are behind all the Russia crap really. They want Russia on their side just like we want them on our side. ;) 

China's making some big moves on the chessboard. China is starting to push their weight around on other countries. They have been building up their military for over 20 years now. They are ready and willing to start a war. And India is the one they picked. 

As a lot of things come from China... What is going to happen when they go to war with India? Will they close down some factories that make junk they sell to other countries? Will they convert some of their factories to war time factories? How is mainland China going to respond to war? 

If you think about it... a small war with India would set them up both militarily and domestically to manufacture the war materials. So they would already be in a position to continue supplying their war machine after that war is over. And then they will have the experience they need and the supplies to take on the USA. They are training and getting ready to take over their little part of the world and ocean. They want to control it all. They lie and say they don't but their actions prove differently. 

India and China are going to war. Take that to the bank and cash it. It's a good check. :nodl:

they BOTH have nukes and could be serious issues if they wipe out each other!! fallout goes around the world not to mention the economic issues it would create.

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