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Ukshep

Oxygen Producing Comet Found in Deep Space

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 Ukshep    14,519

Now this title has me all Oooooo inside.... Have yet to read so my comments will come after!

In 2015, scientists announced the detection molecular oxygen at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which was studied by the Rosetta spacecraft. It was the “biggest surprise of the mission,” they said — a discovery that could change our understanding of how the solar system formed.

While molecular oxygen is common on Earth, it is rarely seen elsewhere in the universe. In fact, astronomers have detected molecular oxygen outside the solar system only twice, and never before on a comet.

The initial explanation for the oxygen found in the faint envelope of gas that surrounds the comet was that the oxygen was frozen inside the comet since the beginning of our solar system some 4.6 billion years ago. It was believed that the oxygen had thawed as the comet made its way closer to the Sun.

https://www.seeker.com/space/comet-67p-found-to-be-producing-its-own-oxygen-in-deep-space?utm_campaign=socialflow&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=seekersocial

I missed this when it originally came out it seems! I have to ask myself.... Could I land and survive on said comet and breath?

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Since comets are indicative of an electrical interaction between the comet and the sun's energetic output, there are a number of elements synthesized in the coma and tail. It's the same way that new elements are formed in the sun's corona. 

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