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Cryptic Mole

Déjà Vu is the Epitome of Special. Science Currently Has No Explanation

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Déjà Vu is the Epitome of Special. Science Currently Has No Explanation:

Jun 24, 2017:

For the past several years, scientists have been publishing papers claiming to have discovered what a déjà vu truly is.

One paper was published in 2008, a “report by Colorado State University psychologist Anne M. Cleary, published in Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science,” according to Psychological Science. If you’d like to read what they had to say, click this link.

In 2016, headlines were made about déjà vu being “the brain checking its memory,” when research from the UK claimed to identify what it means. According to New Scientist:

“Déjà vu was thought to be caused by the brain making false memories, but research by Akira O’Connor at the University of St Andrews, UK, and his team now suggests this is wrong. Exactly how déjà vu works have long been a mystery, partly because it's fleeting and unpredictable nature makes it difficult to study. To get around this, O’Connor and his colleagues developed a way to trigger the sensation of déjà vu in the lab.

The team’s technique uses a standard method to trigger false memories. It involves telling a person a list of related words – such as bed, pillow, night, dream – but not the keyword linking them together, in this case, sleep. When the person is later quizzed on the words they’ve heard, they tend to believe they have also heard “sleep” – a false memory.
To create the feeling of déjà vu, O’ Connor’s team first asked people if they had heard any words beginning with the letter “s”. The volunteers replied that they hadn’t. This meant that when they were later asked if they had heard the word sleep, they were able to remember that they couldn’t have, but at the same time, the word felt familiar. “They report having this strange experience of déjà vu,” says O’Connor.
Brain conflict

His team used fMRI to scan the brains of 21 volunteers while they experienced this triggered déjà vu. We might expect that areas of the brain involved in memories, such as the hippocampus, would be active during this phenomenon, but this wasn’t the case. O’Connor’s team found that the frontal areas of the brain that are involved in decision making were active instead.”

Read More: http://themindunleashed.com/2017/06/deja-vu-epitome-special-science-currently-no-explanation.html

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3 hours ago, Cryptic Mole said:

@Ukshep , False Memory Keyword Triggers...

Good Stuff!

Oh now this is interesting to know.....

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1 hour ago, Ukshep said:

Oh now this is interesting to know.....

They say it creates a form of deja vu, but I already knew that real deja vu is a .23 second reset in an obvious glitch in what most people falsely call the matrix.

However, I do like the way they triggered that particular deja vu with misleading word keys that lead them to assume the word sleep needed to be associated with it. That was so cool how they figured that out.

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6 hours ago, Cryptic Mole said:

Déjà Vu is the Epitome of Special. Science Currently Has No Explanation:

Jun 24, 2017:

For the past several years, scientists have been publishing papers claiming to have discovered what a déjà vu truly is.

One paper was published in 2008, a “report by Colorado State University psychologist Anne M. Cleary, published in Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science,” according to Psychological Science. If you’d like to read what they had to say, click this link.

In 2016, headlines were made about déjà vu being “the brain checking its memory,” when research from the UK claimed to identify what it means. According to New Scientist:

“Déjà vu was thought to be caused by the brain making false memories, but research by Akira O’Connor at the University of St Andrews, UK, and his team now suggests this is wrong. Exactly how déjà vu works have long been a mystery, partly because it's fleeting and unpredictable nature makes it difficult to study. To get around this, O’Connor and his colleagues developed a way to trigger the sensation of déjà vu in the lab.

The team’s technique uses a standard method to trigger false memories. It involves telling a person a list of related words – such as bed, pillow, night, dream – but not the keyword linking them together, in this case, sleep. When the person is later quizzed on the words they’ve heard, they tend to believe they have also heard “sleep” – a false memory.
To create the feeling of déjà vu, O’ Connor’s team first asked people if they had heard any words beginning with the letter “s”. The volunteers replied that they hadn’t. This meant that when they were later asked if they had heard the word sleep, they were able to remember that they couldn’t have, but at the same time, the word felt familiar. “They report having this strange experience of déjà vu,” says O’Connor.
Brain conflict

His team used fMRI to scan the brains of 21 volunteers while they experienced this triggered déjà vu. We might expect that areas of the brain involved in memories, such as the hippocampus, would be active during this phenomenon, but this wasn’t the case. O’Connor’s team found that the frontal areas of the brain that are involved in decision making were active instead.”

Read More: http://themindunleashed.com/2017/06/deja-vu-epitome-special-science-currently-no-explanation.html

What a useless crock of frivoless research salary. "I'm going to study dogs, so first I'm gonna build an artificial dog" - these squibs actually get paid the poofter life, for being pointless and upholding the current exclusive narrative to further show people how all thier instincts and instruments are just "false memories". They seemed to practice creating deceit more than anything else. Real study title: "Proven: They still want to believe in authority without discerment or discretion and don't even think twice about kockamamy frog fart studies." I am glad Trump cut at least some of these scientific parasites.

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Déjà Vu and telepathy are all forms of cognitive quantum entanglement.

There is case after case of identical twins that knew the exact moment when the other died.

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Interesting stuff CM. I have deja vu a lot. Usually at a minimum it will happen once a week but there have been days where it was happen all day long. Once I was even commenting on it to my wife and she just kept thinking I was messing with her until I told her that around a certain time I was going to get a call to go to work on a certain weekend that I really had no clue about. And next thing at exactly the time I said my phone was ringing and it was a client neeedibg work done on the exact day I said. She kinda flipped out. Lol. Deja vu is def a strange phenomenon! 

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5 hours ago, Curenado said:

What a useless crock of frivoless research salary. "I'm going to study dogs, so first I'm gonna build an artificial dog" - these squibs actually get paid the poofter life, for being pointless and upholding the current exclusive narrative to further show people how all thier instincts and instruments are just "false memories". They seemed to practice creating deceit more than anything else. Real study title: "Proven: They still want to believe in authority without discerment or discretion and don't even think twice about kockamamy frog fart studies." I am glad Trump cut at least some of these scientific parasites.

I think that delving into the unknown can sometimes be a noble cause. However, that may sometimes depend on where the funding is coming from. Not all funding comes from the government, though. Lots of research is funded privately because someone somewhere sees the potential. I think where this can sometimes become taboo depends on whether this is being done to expand human knowledge and understanding or when done for a profit.

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4 hours ago, Groove said:

Interesting stuff CM. I have deja vu a lot. Usually at a minimum it will happen once a week but there have been days where it was happen all day long. Once I was even commenting on it to my wife and she just kept thinking I was messing with her until I told her that around a certain time I was going to get a call to go to work on a certain weekend that I really had no clue about. And next thing at exactly the time I said my phone was ringing and it was a client neeedibg work done on the exact day I said. She kinda flipped out. Lol. Deja vu is def a strange phenomenon! 

It used to be more common for me when I was younger and when I had much less understanding of it. Now since I have a better understanding, it rarely happens at all anymore. I have over time realized that we ourselves are not the cause of this phenomenon, but instead a victim of it. At least indirectly that is. Many times people misconstrued a sudden epiphany or intuitive clarity to this when they are something entirely different. This is where people begin to falter and become confused so they research the more common research and data points which only confuses them even more. In all actuality, there is obviously something happening that we will never fully understand. Is it something that's beneficial or harmful? I don't know, but one thing is certain, it's obviously something that's needed by someone somewhere!

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