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COBO Member

A Scary Perspective From A Fitz Crewman

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 COBO Member    3,353

For my civilian family. You have all seen and heard about our Navy ship the USS FITZGERALD and it's horrific collision at sea. You have heard about the ...loss of seven Sailors. What you may not be able to understand is what happened in "real talk". At the request of some, I will make this more real for you.

I want you to pretend all of this. Laying in bed at 0230 in the morning. Peaceful, with the hum of the fan and the gentle sway of your bed (imagine you are in a hammock of sorts). You are sound asleep when the most terrible noise comes out of no where, it's the sound of metal on metal, your bed will tip over and within seconds your bedroom starts to flood. What you need to understand is that you have seconds to escape. You will grab anyone that you can and you will go, faster than you have ever gone. You will go to your assigned location (imagine meeting outside on the lawn of your house). This isn't a drill, this is real, that water will fill that berthing in less than a minute...because what you don't know is that hole is massive. Your fight and flight instincts will kick in--because you have been trained for this very situation.

You will have to make sure that you get those doors closed because if you don't your entire house will flood, you will in essence sink. You have to get the doors closed....but once those doors shut, they cannot be opened while at sea.

The pain those Sailors are going through right now, the guilt that some may have because they couldn't save everyone, they had to close the door. The loss of their Shipmates, their friends, their possessions, their lives were changed in a matter of minutes. Their battle will forever be bittersweet, they saved that ship, they kept her from sinking...but they will have forever lost seven Sailors, brothers, sons, fathers, friends....amazing men that gave their life to our United States Navy.

The Forward Deployed Naval Force in Japan is doing everything that they can to support this fighting ship, I am asking you....from the bottom of my heart to do something too. Send them a card, send toiletries, send clothing, send whatever you would like and you if you cannot send anything--please send them your love, your prayers and thoughts of peace and strength. The information is below:

USS FITZGERALD
UNIT 100173 BOX 1
FPO, AP 96665-1280

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 COBO Member    3,353
9 minutes ago, periclymenoides said:

I saw a couple of submarine movies when I was little that scarred me for life.  Closing the door.

Great fun: If you put the stopper in the bathtub and turn on the shower, you can pretend you're in a sub that's sinking.

And if anybody still has time to read, Here's one that gave me the heebie-jeebies while deployed on the Ranger:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2197707.Ghostboat

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 MuchMaligned    242

Those 7 sailors had tens of thousands of family and friends and protected hundred of millions of Americans and their allies.

 

 

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I've been asked if there's a way to directly donate as well.  I realize this isn't too very likely, but it might be helpful for some that struggle to be able to mail things directly, or wanting to get help to the sailors more quickly.  

Thanks!

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 COBO Member    3,353
37 minutes ago, PrincessButtercup said:

I've been asked if there's a way to directly donate as well.  I realize this isn't too very likely, but it might be helpful for some that struggle to be able to mail things directly, or wanting to get help to the sailors more quickly.  

Thanks!

That's great! Never meant for the thread to appear as a donation drive. But a lot of people have no concept of what shipboard life is/can be like. We were in berthing watching a movie when a call of a fuel oil spill came across the intercom. Thought nothing of it. Next came the "Fire in..." Then that call turned into General Quarters. We all looked at each other with our jaws on the floor. Then the CO gets on there and in no uncertain terms let us know it was for real. As I got to the hangar deck headed for my shop, all I see stacked everywhere were pallets and pallets of bombs. With extremely nervous fork lift drivers ready to start shoving everything over the side if things really got out of hand. Pffft...just another day at the office.

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1 hour ago, COBO Member said:

That's great! Never meant for the thread to appear as a donation drive. But a lot of people have no concept of what shipboard life is/can be like. We were in berthing watching a movie when a call of a fuel oil spill came across the intercom. Thought nothing of it. Next came the "Fire in..." Then that call turned into General Quarters. We all looked at each other with our jaws on the floor. Then the CO gets on there and in no uncertain terms let us know it was for real. As I got to the hangar deck headed for my shop, all I see stacked everywhere were pallets and pallets of bombs. With extremely nervous fork lift drivers ready to start shoving everything over the side if things really got out of hand. Pffft...just another day at the office.

Oh holy, so you were on there when it happened?  ETA: been on a coast guard cutter, so yeah, it's an interesting experience.  I was in the Navy, so I know how it goes.  Got my finger caught in the lock part of a hatch once.    

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 COBO Member    3,353
8 hours ago, PrincessButtercup said:

Oh holy, so you were on there when it happened?  ETA: been on a coast guard cutter, so yeah, it's an interesting experience.  I was in the Navy, so I know how it goes.  Got my finger caught in the lock part of a hatch once.    

This was on the Ranger back in '76. Back then, when a carrier was headed back from Westpac, they offloaded ordnance in Subic Bay to be transferred to the next carrier when they arrived.

Did a swap once, and rode on a cruiser from the Philippines to Hong Kong...through a typhoon. As you say, an interesting experience.

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4 hours ago, COBO Member said:

This was on the Ranger back in '76. Back then, when a carrier was headed back from Westpac, they offloaded ordnance in Subic Bay to be transferred to the next carrier when they arrived.

Did a swap once, and rode on a cruiser from the Philippines to Hong Kong...through a typhoon. As you say, an interesting experience.

Ohhh, yeah I bet.  There were times I was worried about the ship I was on.  CGCs tend to be a lot smaller and less weight.  We got tossed around quite a bit in the ocean.  Carriers are huge though, so I can't imagine how that would be in such crazy weather.  O.O  

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 COBO Member    3,353
12 minutes ago, PrincessButtercup said:

Ohhh, yeah I bet.  There were times I was worried about the ship I was on.  CGCs tend to be a lot smaller and less weight.  We got tossed around quite a bit in the ocean.  Carriers are huge though, so I can't imagine how that would be in such crazy weather.  O.O  

Yep, those cutters are tiny compared a carrier. We used to mess with the noobs onboard the carrier by sitting in a row on a workbench and all start rocking side to side.  While I was on that cruiser (CG-23) I never did the technicolor yawn but thought about it.

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