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Ukshep

A third of the honeybee colonies in America died in 2016: Why you should care

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 Ukshep    20,194

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/05/26/third-nations-honeybee-colonies-died-last-year-why-you-should-care/348418001/#

America's beekeepers watched as a third of the country's honeybee colonies were lost over the last year, part of a decade-long die-off experts said may threaten our food supply.

The annual survey of roughly 5,000 beekeepers showed the 33% dip from April 2016 to April 2017. The decrease is small compared to the survey's previous 10 years, when the decrease hovered at roughly 40%. From 2012 to 2013, nearly half of the nation's colonies died.

"I would stop short of calling this 'good' news," said Dennis vanEngelsdorp, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland. "Colony loss of more than 30% over the entire year is high. It's hard to imagine any other agricultural sector being able to stay in business with such consistently high losses."

The research, published Thursday, is the work of the nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership and the Apiary Inspectors of America.

This is not good! But I am ware that you all know this. What are we going to actually do if they become endangered fully?

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 Tarmalen    1,310
40 minutes ago, Ukshep said:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/05/26/third-nations-honeybee-colonies-died-last-year-why-you-should-care/348418001/#

America's beekeepers watched as a third of the country's honeybee colonies were lost over the last year, part of a decade-long die-off experts said may threaten our food supply.

The annual survey of roughly 5,000 beekeepers showed the 33% dip from April 2016 to April 2017. The decrease is small compared to the survey's previous 10 years, when the decrease hovered at roughly 40%. From 2012 to 2013, nearly half of the nation's colonies died.

"I would stop short of calling this 'good' news," said Dennis vanEngelsdorp, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland. "Colony loss of more than 30% over the entire year is high. It's hard to imagine any other agricultural sector being able to stay in business with such consistently high losses."

The research, published Thursday, is the work of the nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership and the Apiary Inspectors of America.

This is not good! But I am ware that you all know this. What are we going to actually do if they become endangered fully?

Nature will correct itself. Remember....bees utilize the magnetic lines for direction...(*cough* pole shift....*cough*)

It takes more than one generation to correct the path of the idiotic parents.  /s

 

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 apache54    4,918
4 hours ago, Ukshep said:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/05/26/third-nations-honeybee-colonies-died-last-year-why-you-should-care/348418001/#

America's beekeepers watched as a third of the country's honeybee colonies were lost over the last year, part of a decade-long die-off experts said may threaten our food supply.

The annual survey of roughly 5,000 beekeepers showed the 33% dip from April 2016 to April 2017. The decrease is small compared to the survey's previous 10 years, when the decrease hovered at roughly 40%. From 2012 to 2013, nearly half of the nation's colonies died.

"I would stop short of calling this 'good' news," said Dennis vanEngelsdorp, an assistant professor at the University of Maryland. "Colony loss of more than 30% over the entire year is high. It's hard to imagine any other agricultural sector being able to stay in business with such consistently high losses."

The research, published Thursday, is the work of the nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership and the Apiary Inspectors of America.

This is not good! But I am ware that you all know this. What are we going to actually do if they become endangered fully?

this has been happening for quite a few years, I went to a seminar on how to raise bees about 5 years ago and it was bad then, like I keep saying those who control the money,food, water control the PEOPLE!!

most of the bee die off is thought to be man caused!!

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 Ukshep    20,194
15 minutes ago, apache54 said:

this has been happening for quite a few years, I went to a seminar on how to raise bees about 5 years ago and it was bad then, like I keep saying those who control the money,food, water control the PEOPLE!!

most of the bee die off is thought to be man caused!!

It can only go on for so long before it goes too far! But then you just know they have some nano machine solution... Mini flying bees or something similar... Makes me wonder. They let the natural die so they can replace??

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Fact #1:  Honeybees ARE NOT native to North America! They are an INVASIVE SPECIES imported by European settlers some 300ish years ago.

Fact #2: Honeybees compete with other native species for food forage: pollen & nectar. The more honeybees there are in NA, the more the Bumblebee species' will struggle.

Fact #3: CCD or Colony Collapse Disorder in honeybees was shown to be a myth about 7 years ago. Honeybees have a plethora of natural diseases that must be treated on a continuous basis year after year, or your honeybees will die.

Fact #4: It is completely normal for a beekeeper to lose up to 50% of their hives every winter. In the wild, honeybee winter survival rates are MUCH MUCH LESS.

Fact #4: I achieved 100% survival over the winter of my honeybee hives, and have doubled their numbers this spring. Successful beekeeping lies completely in efficient and timely bee management policies. I'm not the only beekeeper in my area who has had 100% survival.

 

Yeah, the article is pure fearmongering. Lots and lots of gmo food crops are self pollinated anyways, and gmo food crops tend to be bad for honeybees. Best to keep hives away from gmo fields.

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 apache54    4,918
12 minutes ago, Ukshep said:

It can only go on for so long before it goes too far! But then you just know they have some nano machine solution... Mini flying bees or something similar... Makes me wonder. They let the natural die so they can replace??

what they are not saying and what has been happening is OTHER bugs and insects do help to pollinate and that is what has been keeping crops going, I don't think they could build enough nano machines to replace the millions of bees world wide.

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 Ukshep    20,194
1 minute ago, apache54 said:

what they are not saying and what has been happening is OTHER bugs and insects do help to pollinate and that is what has been keeping crops going, I don't think they could build enough nano machines to replace the millions of bees world wide.

I was thinking more transcendence... Self replicating nano mist with multiple uses. Oh... a thought! chem-trails anyone???

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 CGK    2,627

If we could get 1/3 of the skeeters to die I would be happy.

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 Brio    1,038

There may be a bit of hype to this, every winter ~ 30% of bees die off. I've kept bees though by no stretch am I an expert. A winter kill of 20% is considered light.

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 apache54    4,918
35 minutes ago, Your local beekeep said:

Fact #1:  Honeybees ARE NOT native to North America! They are an INVASIVE SPECIES imported by European settlers some 300ish years ago.

Fact #2: Honeybees compete with other native species for food forage: pollen & nectar. The more honeybees there are in NA, the more the Bumblebee species' will struggle.

Fact #3: CCD or Colony Collapse Disorder in honeybees was shown to be a myth about 7 years ago. Honeybees have a plethora of natural diseases that must be treated on a continuous basis year after year, or your honeybees will die.

Fact #4: It is completely normal for a beekeeper to lose up to 50% of their hives every winter. In the wild, honeybee winter survival rates are MUCH MUCH LESS.

Fact #4: I achieved 100% survival over the winter of my honeybee hives, and have doubled their numbers this spring. Successful beekeeping lies completely in efficient and timely bee management policies. I'm not the only beekeeper in my area who has had 100% survival.

 

Yeah, the article is pure fearmongering. Lots and lots of gmo food crops are self pollinated anyways, and gmo food crops tend to be bad for honeybees. Best to keep hives away from gmo fields.

you left out the facts of killer bees and how they  got here and are dominate, would you "bee" so kind and throw thoughts on those!

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12 minutes ago, apache54 said:

you left out the facts of killer bees and how they  got here and are dominate, would you "bee" so kind and throw thoughts on those!

What does it matter? The honeybees existing in the wild in North America aren't wild bees, even if they have AHB genes. All honeybees in North America that don't live in a beekeeper's hive box are FERAL, because they aren't native to the continent. Lots of beekeepers keep bees with AHB genes. In some states its difficult to keep hives free of AHB genes.

It's my opinion that if human beekeeping ceased in North America, within 100 years the Honeybee would become nearly extinct in North America. I don't think that's a bad thing at all.

Follow the logic: If some humans are upset that other humans are doing things that hurt honeybees, BECAUSE supposedly hurting honeybees threatens natural pollination, then shouldn't those same upset humans be EVEN MORE UPSET at the humans that introduce the invasive honeybee into a pre-existing natural ecosystem?

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 Brio    1,038
59 minutes ago, Your local beekeep said:

I achieved 100% survival over the winter of my honeybee hives, and have doubled their numbers this spring.

Good to hear. I notice this spring a 100 fold increase in the # of bees around here. Not the most I've seen but last year there were next to none.

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