Jump to content
Advertise With Us!
Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.
Sign in to follow this  
Cinnamon

Study: Second Opinion from Doctor Results in Different Diagnosis 88% of Time

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

 Cinnamon    16,147

Via: Mayo Clinic:

Many patients come to Mayo Clinic for a second opinion or diagnosis confirmation before treatment for a complex condition. In a new study, Mayo Clinic reports that as many as 88 percent of those patients go home with a new or refined diagnosis — changing their care plan and potentially their lives. Conversely, only 12 percent receive confirmation that the original diagnosis was complete and correct.

<snip>

http://www.cryptogon.com/?p=50776

LOL How's that for no accuracy??? Scary! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 Guitar Doc    1,208
4 hours ago, Cinnamon said:

Via: Mayo Clinic:

Many patients come to Mayo Clinic for a second opinion or diagnosis confirmation before treatment for a complex condition. In a new study, Mayo Clinic reports that as many as 88 percent of those patients go home with a new or refined diagnosis — changing their care plan and potentially their lives. Conversely, only 12 percent receive confirmation that the original diagnosis was complete and correct.

<snip>

http://www.cryptogon.com/?p=50776

LOL How's that for no accuracy??? Scary! 

I always say when two Doctors disagree you get the medical-board convene to see which one was wrong and strike them off.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 Brio    1,038

LOL I got a letter from the doctor's office, all worried I haven't been in for a check up for... a while. It seems the cancer clinic is looking for more patients.

Fwiw, my step mother died from undiagnosed lung cancer but had never smoked anything in her life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 Nauta    16

This study and its conclusion needs a large grain of salt.  It flips the numbers for shock and awe.

The primary care providers mentioned are the tip of the spear so to speak.  Their job is to recognize and funnel the ambiguous, uncertain, and undiagnosed cases to the specialists who then can use the resources at their disposal to better describe and treat.  These primary care providers don't have to be 100% right in their initial suspicions, they just have to recognize that something is not right.  For example, your family physician is performing a school sports physical on your daughter.  He listens to her heart and hears an abnormal heart sound.  It could be a normal thing some fast growing teenagers have and grow out of, or it could be hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the condition you hear about where a seemingly healthy teenager drops dead from a heart attack during a football/soccer/basketball game. The physician refers the patient to a cardiologist for further evaluation and management.  This then falls into that 66% in the study where the working diagnoses was better defined or refined.  Folks, that's that physician, nurse practitioner, physician assistant doing his or her job.  If there was an ultrasound in their clinic and would had the specialized training to diagnose this important condition then that would have put him/her into the 12%.  And even then, they may refer to a cardiologist for that "second opinion"....."Hey, John, I got a kid here who I think has HCM, would you run her through your protocol to see if we are on the same page?"  Now we are up to 78%.  This isn't bad medicine, it is actually very good medicine.  To fault this, as the article seems to conclude, seems to miss the point of the stratification of the medical system.

This is from the article:

In 12% (36/286) of cases, referral diagnoses were the same as final diagnoses. Final diagnoses were better defined/refined in 66% (188/286) of cases; but in 21% of cases (62/286), final diagnoses were distinctly different than referral diagnoses. Total costs for cases in category 3 (different final diagnoses) were significantly higher than costs for cases in category 1 (P = .0001) and category 2 (P = <.0001).

Well, how about that 21%?  In the example above, the physician may have suspected HCM, but it turns out that after sending the child to the cardiologist, the child had something wrong with that heart from perhaps an untreated past strep throat infection.  Agreed that the final diagnosis is now different from the referral diagnosis, but the fact is that the primary care provider still did his/her job by recognizing and getting the patient to the next level of care.  Of course the total cost will be higher:  The primary care physician has his pen and paper to take a good history, physical exam, a blood pressure cuff to take the child's blood pressure, and a stethoscope to listen to what's going on in the chest.....that's it.  The specialist, because they are the specialist, will have access to chest x-ray, ECG, echocardiography, laboratory studies, and even more expensive tools to better categorize that ambiguous heart sound.  There is your higher cost.

I think that this study seems to be a scare piece thrown together to show off Mayo clinic to drum up business ("See how good we are compared to those others?"), but studies like these taken out of context only engenders widespread distrust of the entire medical community.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 schon    778
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Nauta said:

This study and its conclusion needs a large grain of salt.  It flips the numbers for shock and awe.

The primary care providers mentioned are the tip of the spear so to speak.  Their job is to recognize and funnel the ambiguous, uncertain, and undiagnosed cases to the specialists who then can use the resources at their disposal to better describe and treat.  These primary care providers don't have to be 100% right in their initial suspicions, they just have to recognize that something is not right.

I think that this study seems to be a scare piece thrown together to show off Mayo clinic to drum up business ("See how good we are compared to those others?"), but studies like these taken out of context only engenders widespread distrust of the entire medical community.

excellent post.Though i have widespread distrust of the medical community after a lifetime working for it.A lot of needless expensive tests,treatments/meds with low or even harmful results (money money money money..MONEY!),that sort of thing.I feel sorry for the general public that has NO CLUE of the specific scams medicine is perpetrating upon them.

Edited by schon
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

@schon Any that you would be willing to share that might not be so obvious. I have been working with a couple of dR. that are more neuropathic in nature. I am pretty savvy to what goes on the medical community, but I am sure there is much more I could learn

Edited by CarnivalofCrazy
spelling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 schon    778
2 hours ago, CarnivalofCrazy said:

@schon Any that you would be willing to share that might not be so obvious. I have been working with a couple of dR. that are more neuropathic in nature. I am pretty savvy to what goes on the medical community, but I am sure there is much more I could learn

Sent you a message....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 Waitn4end    174

The  little woman went to four different doctors because of insurance changes and doctor retirements but they all said the same thing.  100% said you need to lose weight.  Some things speak for themselves.  She is very healthy and lives a good lifestyle. 

She is losing some weight too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up to our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

  1. Jump To Top
×