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Gigantopithecus

Tasty meals for the coming apocalypse

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Canned chicken , mixed with canned spiced butter beans , canned spiced black eye peas , and canned sweet corn. Mix furiously with  clean hands  , using  an agitative m0tion , like a washing machine ,  add a shot of hot sauce and teriyaki to enhance flavor . 

 

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 Walk Softly    2,670

All pulled out of your root cellar, of course.  And it cooks all day in the Dutch oven, while you tend to your garden and farm animals for next harvest.  

Mighty fine apocalypse, if I may be so bold... 

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 Williams    505

I actually understood the Apocalypse to refer to quite a hair-raising event. Maybe even a bit like in that video with the zombies too... You know, with lots of people losing it because of getting very thirsty, hungry and desperate and then, some tend to get very "angry"

And then of course, there's always THIS guy (see the first video) and he says:

"I've been hearing something on the streets the last couple of weeks. Weird stuff... Some sort'a epidemic of violence what they been saying. I was talking to one ol' boy he's from, ah, from San Anselmo.. he told me they got some sort of cold up there!..

...End of the World kind of stuff...

 

 

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 Kira    104

They murdered him when he made it known publicly that "They Live" was a documentary...

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 Waitn4end    179

I use a four inch deep half hotel pan.  (Professional cook talk)

Three cups rice...brown or white.

One cup dehydrated onion. One cup dehydrated carrot. One half cup Dehydrated celery. (Any dehydrated veggies you like such as broccoli, peas, and even frozen stir-fry veggies can be added at this point.)

One fourth cup real chicken base (or your powdered chicken bullion-type stuff.)

Two cans white chicken breast meat or tuna or turkey......not pork or beef so much.

One half cup good Olive or Avocado Oil.

 

Put all in the pan, grind in some nice black pepper.  Now bring eight cups of water to a boil and pour it over the mix.  Stir well and cover with a double fold of  that Saran style kitchen wrap...I use the pull and cut off huge roll of plastic type wrap from a restaurant supply store. NOW cover  it with a double fold of Aluminum Foil and crimp the edges well.

Put into a preheated 375 oven for one hour.  Pull out...carefully open just enough to vent...avoid steam burn!  Let the pan sit at least 30 minutes before you take off the lid and gently lift and break up with a large fork.  If you have let it rest...it will fluff up to a great chicken and rice dinner.

I have made this in a Dutch Oven in an outside fire pit and inside a wood stove with outstanding success.  The meal is from storage foods and is both delicious and satisfying.  It can be done with spicy additions but my family like it without the spicy burn.  I have offered Soy Sauce, Teriyaki sauce and stir fry sauces to give it different  tastes.

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 Williams    505
1 hour ago, Waitn4end said:

I use a four inch deep half hotel pan.  (Professional cook talk)

Three cups rice...brown or white.

One cup dehydrated onion. One cup dehydrated carrot. One half cup Dehydrated celery. (Any dehydrated veggies you like such as broccoli, peas, and even frozen stir-fry veggies can be added at this point.)

One fourth cup real chicken base (or your powdered chicken bullion-type stuff.)

Two cans white chicken breast meat or tuna or turkey......not pork or beef so much.

One half cup good Olive or Avocado Oil.

 

Put all in the pan, grind in some nice black pepper.  Now bring eight cups of water to a boil and pour it over the mix.  Stir well and cover with a double fold of  that Saran style kitchen wrap...I use the pull and cut off huge roll of plastic type wrap from a restaurant supply store. NOW cover  it with a double fold of Aluminum Foil and crimp the edges well.

Put into a preheated 375 oven for one hour.  Pull out...carefully open just enough to vent...avoid steam burn!  Let the pan sit at least 30 minutes before you take off the lid and gently lift and break up with a large fork.  If you have let it rest...it will fluff up to a great chicken and rice dinner.

I have made this in a Dutch Oven in an outside fire pit and inside a wood stove with outstanding success.  The meal is from storage foods and is both delicious and satisfying.  It can be done with spicy additions but my family like it without the spicy burn.  I have offered Soy Sauce, Teriyaki sauce and stir fry sauces to give it different  tastes.

Those Dutch Ovens sound nice.

This recipe also sounds like it could potentially work equally well if prepared using a pressure-cooker. 

If gas was being used to cook, say if having to do the cooking indoors and that is what you had, then having a pressure cooker could come in handy as it would save a substantial amount of gas/fuel, due to the reduced amount total cooking time required compared with standard cooking.

This seems like a nice recipe, may have to try this out sometime.

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 Waitn4end    179
15 hours ago, Williams said:

Those Dutch Ovens sound nice.

This recipe also sounds like it could potentially work equally well if prepared using a pressure-cooker. 

If gas was being used to cook, say if having to do the cooking indoors and that is what you had, then having a pressure cooker could come in handy as it would save a substantial amount of gas/fuel, due to the reduced amount total cooking time required compared with standard cooking.

This seems like a nice recipe, may have to try this out sometime.

My cooking of these meals is more or less based on not having electricity to cook with.  So using the coals of an outdoor pit or even the wood stove  makes the cooking possible.  I have cooked  breakfast for all on an outdoor fire...then nestled the Dutch oven down in the ashes and left to go fishing.  The rice needs at least an hour of good heat which it can get...then cools as the ashes cool.  Later in the day  there is a nice meal sitting in the ashes we can dig into.  There is no stirring involved...so the dried veggies are plump, soft and pretty.

The hotel pan will also work great but it needs a bit of space between it and the very hot coals.  So I use rocks around it and sort of "set it and forget it".   I use the oven right now because I am able to and I like to test out the meals pulled out of the preps. 

When something does happen...our group will already know what to expect and I will be practiced in how to prepare meals to please them. At least we will not suffer as we wait for the killing blow from whatever doom is in the cards.

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 Williams    505
22 minutes ago, Waitn4end said:

My cooking of these meals is more or less based on not having electricity to cook with.  So using the coals of an outdoor pit or even the wood stove  makes the cooking possible.  I have cooked  breakfast for all on an outdoor fire...then nestled the Dutch oven down in the ashes and left to go fishing.  The rice needs at least an hour of good heat which it can get...then cools as the ashes cool.  Later in the day  there is a nice meal sitting in the ashes we can dig into.  There is no stirring involved...so the dried veggies are plump, soft and pretty.

The hotel pan will also work great but it needs a bit of space between it and the very hot coals.  So I use rocks around it and sort of "set it and forget it".   I use the oven right now because I am able to and I like to test out the meals pulled out of the preps. 

When something does happen...our group will already know what to expect and I will be practiced in how to prepare meals to please them. At least we will not suffer as we wait for the killing blow from whatever doom is in the cards.

Just looked up to see what a Dutch Oven looks like and then immediately realised that I've used them too, or at least something very similar in the past.

The ones I knew and grew up with, came in various different sizes and were made out of heavy cast-iron, but shaped more like a heavy round-ish black pot and it has 3 legs. But now I see its the same idea and basically the ones I know are just a variation of a Dutch oven. As you said, you fill it with the ingredients, stick it into the coals, and can then forget about it for hours, or even the whole day (as mentioned in one of the top posts) and then come back later to a great meal.

Haven't used one in years... Now there's an idea. 

Like you said, these things absolutely do make for easy and tasty meals and few things beat that nice wood or charcoal fire

Thanks for sharing the recipe.

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 apache54    4,865
On 4/4/2017 at 10:22 PM, Walk Softly said:

All pulled out of your root cellar, of course.  And it cooks all day in the Dutch oven, while you tend to your garden and farm animals for next harvest.  

Mighty fine apocalypse, if I may be so bold... 

YES, protected by my claymores that surround the property, and the arial drones that patrol the perimeter, and the 50 cal. tuned to 1.25 miles

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 Walk Softly    2,670
2 minutes ago, apache54 said:

the 50 cal. tuned to 1.25 miles

Just reaching out and touchin' folks, jack!! 

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 apache54    4,865
3 minutes ago, Walk Softly said:

Just reaching out and touchin' folks, jack!! 

YUP! 

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