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titanic1

Things Food Companies Don't Want You To Know

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 titanic1    244

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hLT-L4re7k


Food companies know that health-driven patrons are partial to products that are made with “natural flavorings” as opposed to the fake stuff. Unfortunately, there is a very blurry line between what is considered to be artificial versus natural. According to Environmental Working Group senior scientist, David Andrews, natural flavors come from natural sources, while artificial flavors are completely man made. However, he goes on to explain that both artificial and natural flavorings can contain anywhere from 50 to 100 ingredients.

To add to the confusion, natural flavors can also be comprised of solvents and preservatives. And in many cases, these “extras” account for 80 to 90 percent of the volume! So in reality, there is a very tiny distinction between artificial and natural flavorings because the natural flavoring has artificial preservatives and solvents mixed in. Shady, right? To learn even more about the coloring in your food, don’t miss our special report, 17 Surprising Foods That Contain Chemicals & Food Dyes.

While you may know that Red #4 is a common food coloring, what you may not know is that it’s actually made from a scaly Mexican insect called the cochineal. According to Winter, any food or cosmetic product that lists carmine, cochineal, and/or carminic acid contains the bug’s extract. Why is it red? The crimson color comes from the sap of the cacti that the species feasts on.

You’re probably wondering how this is even allowed. Well, believe it or not, The Food and Drug Administration backs the use of the ingredient. Because—despite it being an allergen to some—it’s considered to be “safe” enough to ingest. Cochineal can be found in a range of products including yogurt, red applesauce, baked goods, spices, candy, fruit drinks, and flavored gelatin. So proceed with caution and always read food labels before you buy!

Have you ever seen a box of cereal that says, “Just one ¾ cup serving gives you 50 percent of your daily needs of fiber” and wondered how that was even possible? Us, too. Many of these cereals are made with synthetic, isolated fibers like chicory root, maltodextrin, and polydextrose. And while they do add fiber to your food, they can also cause gas, bloating, and other stomach issues when eaten in large quantities.

According to Assistant Professor of food science at the University of Florida, Wendy Joanne Dahl, Ph.D., R.D., isolated fibers such as maltodextrin do not maintain bowel regularity as effectively as natural sources of fiber. To keep your belly happy, stick to natural high fiber foods like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Read more.... http://www.eatthis.com/food-industry-secrets

1 NATURAL FLAVORING 
CAN BE A DECOY
food scientist

Food companies know that health-driven patrons are partial to products that are made with “natural flavorings” as opposed to the fake stuff. Unfortunately, there is a very blurry line between what is considered to be artificial versus natural. According to Environmental Working Group senior scientist, David Andrews, natural flavors come from natural sources, while artificial flavors are completely man made. However, he goes on to explain that both artificial and natural flavorings can contain anywhere from 50 to 100 ingredients.

To add to the confusion, natural flavors can also be comprised of solvents and preservatives. And in many cases, these “extras” account for 80 to 90 percent of the volume! So in reality, there is a very tiny distinction between artificial and natural flavorings because the natural flavoring has artificial preservatives and solvents mixed in. Shady, right? To learn even more about the coloring in your food, don’t miss our special report, 17 Surprising Foods That Contain Chemicals & Food Dyes.

2 RED COLOR = 
CRUSHED BUGS
red jello

While you may know that Red #4 is a common food coloring, what you may not know is that it’s actually made from a scaly Mexican insect called the cochineal. According to Winter, any food or cosmetic product that lists carmine, cochineal, and/or carminic acid contains the bug’s extract. Why is it red? The crimson color comes from the sap of the cacti that the species feasts on.

You’re probably wondering how this is even allowed. Well, believe it or not, The Food and Drug Administration backs the use of the ingredient. Because—despite it being an allergen to some—it’s considered to be “safe” enough to ingest. Cochineal can be found in a range of products including yogurt, red applesauce, baked goods, spices, candy, fruit drinks, and flavored gelatin. So proceed with caution and always read food labels before you buy!

3 HIGH FIBER CLAIMS CAN 
COME WITH DIGESTIVE CONSEQUENCES
cereal in a sack

Have you ever seen a box of cereal that says, “Just one ¾ cup serving gives you 50 percent of your daily needs of fiber” and wondered how that was even possible? Us, too. Many of these cereals are made with synthetic, isolated fibers like chicory root, maltodextrin, and polydextrose. And while they do add fiber to your food, they can also cause gas, bloating, and other stomach issues when eaten in large quantities.

According to Assistant Professor of food science at the University of Florida, Wendy Joanne Dahl, Ph.D., R.D., isolated fibers such as maltodextrin do not maintain bowel regularity as effectively as natural sources of fiber. To keep your belly happy, stick to natural high fiber foods like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

If you think that artificial food dyes are only found in things like colorful popsicles and candies, think again. Everything from pre-packaged burgers and canned soup to pickles and boxed rice may contain caramel coloring, Yellow #5, and Red #40. The easiest way to keep excess amounts of these things out of your diet is to eat a well-balanced diet composed primarily of fresh produce, lean meat, cage-free eggs, and maybe the occasional boxed item. In essence, if you eat these packaged foods in moderation you should be able to avoid any of the adverse health effects that may come about when consumed in excess.

Read more: http://www.eatthis.com/food-industry-secrets

THE FOOD INDUSTRY DOESN'T WANT YOU TO KNOW

. . . that Food Additives May Make Your Kids Misbehave
Researchers at the University of Southampton in the UK found that artificial food coloring and sodium benzoate preservatives are directly linked to increased hyperactivity in children. The additives included Yellow #5, Yellow #6, Red #40, and sodium benzoate, which are commonly found in packaged foods in the United States, but the researchers don't know if it's a combination of the chemicals or if there's a single one that's the primary culprit. You can find Red #40, Yellow #5, and Yellow #6 in Lucky Charms and sodium benzoate in some diet sodas, pickles, and jellies. For healthy grab-and-go snacktime options, check out our list of good snacks that the whole family will love.

SUPERMARKETS DON'T WANT YOU TO KNOW

. . . that Long Lines Will Make You Buy More
If you're stuck in a long checkout line, you'll be up to 25 percent more likely to buy the candy and sodas around you, according to a recent study at the University of Arizona. Psychologists have found that the more exposure someone has to temptation, the more likely it is that he'll succumb to it. This may also help explain why supermarkets lay out their stores so that the common staples-such as milk, bread, and eggs-are at the very back, forcing you to run the gauntlet of culinary temptation.

FOOD COMPANIES ALSO DON'T WANT YOU TO KNOW

. . . that Their Calorie Counts May Be Wrong
That's because in order to make sure you're getting at least as much as you pay for, the FDA is more likely to penalize a food manufacturer for overstating the net weight of a product than understating it. As a result, manufacturers often either "generously" package more food than the stated net weight or make servings heavier than the stated serving size weight. With an ordinary food scale, we put a range of products to the test by checking the actual net weight and serving size weight. Sure enough, we found that a number of popular products are heavier than the package says. And that means you may be eating more calories than you think.

THE FOOD INDUSTRY ALSO DON'T WANT YOU TO KNOW

. . . that Companies Must Pay to Be an American Heart Association-Certified Food
That's why the AHA logo might appear on some products but is absent from others-even when both meet the guidelines.

From: http://www.eatthis.com/11-secrets-food-industry

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