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DarkKnightNomeD

SINCLAIR & HOLTER: THE MOST DANGEROUS PERIOD IN HISTORY IS TODAY

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 DarkKnightNomeD    2,079

Video - Interview, ect.

Published on Oct 1, 2016

This weekend the mainstream media is reporting that 'Germany's Merkel cannot afford to bail out Deutsche Bank', to which we say, yeah no kidding. The $75 Trillion in derivatives on Deutsche bank's books are sinking the bank like the Titanic, and the situation is terminal. Jim Sinclair and Bill Holter from JS Mneset join me to discuss what Jim says is "the most dangerous period in world history" and as goes Deutsche bank. "so goes the world."

 

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 DarkKnightNomeD    2,079

 

Deutsche Bank Charged By Italy For Market Manipulation, Creating False Accounts

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-10-01/deutsche-bank-charged-italy-market-manipulation-creating-false-accounts

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For Deutsche Bank, when it rains, it pours, even when everyone tries to come to its rescue. 

One day after its stock soared from all time lows, following what so far appears to have been a fabricated report sourced by AFP which relied on Twitter as a source that the DOJ would reduce its RMBS settlement amount with Deutsche Bank from $14 billion to below $6 billion (and which neither the DOJ nor Deutsche Bank have confirmed for obvious reasons), moments ago Bloomberg reported that six current and former managers of Deutsche Bank, including Michele Faissola, Michele Foresti and Ivor Dunbar, were charged in Milan for colluding to falsify the accounts of Italy’s third-biggest bank, Monte Paschi (which itself is so insolvent it is currently scrambling to finalize a private sector bailout) and manipulate the market. Two former executives at Nomura Holdings Inc. and five at Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena were also charged.

The news comes in a time of heated relations between Italy and Germany, when the former has been pushing to get German "permission" for a state bailout of its insolvent banks only to be met by stiff resistance by the latter as Merkel and Schauble have demanded a bail-in of private investors instead, even as - ironically - it has been Deutsche Bank's woeful financial state that has been in the Wall Street spotlight this past week.

The charges culminate a three-year investigation by prosecutors that showed Monte Paschi used the transactions to hide losses, leading to a misrepresentation of its accounts between 2008 and 2012. The deals came to light in January 2013, when Bloomberg News reported that Monte Paschi used derivatives to hide losses.

As BBG adds, "the charges deal another blow to Deutsche Bank, which is seeking to reassure investors and clients that it will be able to withstand pending U.S. penalties over the bank’s sale of mortgage-backed securities and its dealings with some Russian clients."

In what appears to be another case of Wells Fargo-esque scapegoating of junior employees to keep senior execs off the hook, just weeks after Milan prosecutors shelved a probe against Monte Paschi's former chairman and CEO for alleged market manipulation and false accounting as it "risked undermining investor sentiment", a judge approved a request by Milan prosecutors to try the bankers on charges involving two separate derivative transactions arranged with Nomura and Deutsche Bank, said a lawyer involved in the case who was in the courtroom Saturday as the decision was announced.

DB's Faissola, whose roles included overseeing rates and commodities, was put in charge of Deutsche Bank’s combined asset and wealth management division in 2012 when Anshu Jain and Juergen Fitschen took over as co-chief executive officers of the Frankfurt-based lender. Deutsche Bank last October said Faissola would leave after a transition period, and John Cryan has replaced Jain and Fitschen as CEO.

Just as importantly, the firms are also named as defendants in the indictment, as the Italian law provides for a direct liability of legal entities for certain crimes committed by their representatives. Which means even more legal charges, fines and settlements are looking likely in DB's future.

A trial is scheduled for Dec. 15.

Both DB and Nomura have denied any guilt:  “We will put forward our defense in court and have no further comment to make today,” Deutsche Bank said in an e-mailed statement. “I’m convinced that the debate will definitely show that Nomura has no responsibility over Monte Paschi’s false accounting,” said Guido Alleva, a lawyer for Nomura. A spokeswoman for the Japanese bank and a Paschi spokesman declined to comment.

As Bloomberg adds, Monte Paschi’s former executives Giuseppe Mussari, Antonio Vigni and Gianluca Baldassarri, and Nomura’s former bankers Sadeq Sayeed and Raffaele Ricci also will face trial for allegedly obstructing regulators after the investigation revealed that the 2009 deal, dubbed Alexandria, was designed to disguise losses from a previous investment.

The basis for the legal action are two deals conducted by Deutsche Bank and Nomura which took place at the height of the financial crisis, meant to mask Monte Paschi's financial woes. Prosecutors have been reconstructing how Monte Paschi’s former managers misrepresented the lender’s finances in the years through the two deals signed with Deutsche Bank in 2008 and Nomura in 2009.  The investigation revealed Monte Paschi arranged the transactions to hide billions in losses that led to false accounting between 2008 and 2012, according to a prosecutors’ statement released Jan. 14, when they completed the investigation.

 

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 Brio    1,038

They borrowed €16 bb stating they needed the capital to recapitalize, then turned around and handed out €19 bb in bonuses.

Rats deserting a sinking ship.

Too big to bail.

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21 minutes ago, Brio said:

They borrowed €16 bb stating they needed the capital to recapitalize, then turned around and handed out €19 bb in bonuses.

Rats deserting a sinking ship.

Too big to bail.

Maybe they did business with Wells Fargo?

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