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Cinnamon

Zoologists hunting Tasmanian tiger declare 'no doubt' species still alive

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It had been considered extinct for nearly 80 years, but the Tasmanian tiger has been declared alive and kicking by an intrepid group of British naturalists.

A team of investigators from the Centre for Fortean Zoology, which operates from a small farmhouse in north Devon, is currently in Tasmania hunting down clues to prove the thylacine, commonly known as the Tassie tiger, still exists.

The group claims to have gathered compelling evidence of the thylacine’s presence in remote parts of Tasmania’s north-west, despite the last known animal dying in Hobart Zoo on 7 September 1936.

The Centre for Fortean Zoology said it has talked to several “highly credible” witnesses of the thylacine and has found animal faeces that could belong to the beast. The droppings have been preserved in alcohol and are being sent awayfor DNA analysis.

The cryptozoologist team, which has previously attempted to find the yeti and boasts that has evidence of a mysterious Indonesian ape that walks on two legs, is one week into a fortnight-long trip to discover if the thylacine still exists.

Richard Freeman, zoological director of the organisation, told Guardian Australia he has “no doubt” the species still roams isolated areas of Tasmania.

“The area is so damn remote, there are so many prey species and we have so many reliable witnesses who know the bush that I’d say there is a reasonable population of them left,” he said. “I’d say there are more of them around in the world than Javan rhinos.” The World Wildlife Fund estimates that there are just 35 Javan rhinos left.

Freeman said he had spoken to a forestry worker who had seen an animal in daylight in 2011 which was distinctive because of its striped rear end, long stiff tail and “weird rolling motion, almost like a cow” when it walked.

<snip>

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/11/zoologists-on-the-hunt-for-tasmanian-tiger-declare-no-doubt-species-still-alive

I've been reading about this animal for at least 10 years. This article is a little dated, but interesting to me because I am really hoping that this creature wasn't wiped out and it still exists. 

 

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Posted (edited)

3 minutes ago, Cinnamon said:

 

That kinda looks like the whippet hound we rescued from an Ethiopian BBQ.

Edited by Team Uzi

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1 minute ago, Cryptic Mole said:

Remember the story behind Jurassic Park?

I think they remade that movie into a Islamic prison flick.

It's entitled "Jurass is Pork"

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That critter may still be out there but I'm hoping to see a bigfoot just once out here in bigfoot country where we live.

We've seen stranger things.

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2 minutes ago, Team Uzi said:

That critter may still be out there but I'm hoping to see a bigfoot just once out here in bigfoot country where we live.

We've seen stranger things.

That's intriguing, tell your stories about what you've seen, please. 

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4 minutes ago, Cinnamon said:

That's intriguing, tell your stories about what you've seen, please. 

Well,

On a crypto zoological level, we have witnessed living pterodactyls.

8 to be exact. I saw 7 and my better half saw one.

It was extremely exhilarating and terrifying at the same time.

Never looked at the world we live in the same way again.

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