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Ukshep

2 aftershocks hit Kumamoto prefecture, Japan - Earthquake Climax coming soon? Nibiru? California?

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Have you seen this? this is getting crazy an crazier. So many quakes in the last month. Feels almost like we are heading for a climax. Maybe california?

2 aftershocks hit Kumamoto prefecture, Japan

Two aftershocks, one of which measured a magnitude of 5.3 on the USGS scale, have hit Kumamoto prefecture, Japan. It comes just days after two deadly earthquakes hit the region, killing 42 and injuring more than 1,000 others.

A tsunami warning has not been issued, Japanese broadcaster NHK reported.

The aftershocks measured 3.9 and 3.4 on the Japanese scale, according to the country's Meteorological Agency. Each had a depth of 10 kilometers (6.2 miles).

The US Geological Survey (USGS) put the first aftershock at a magnitude of 5.3, with the epicenter located 25 kilometers (15.5 miles) east of Kikuchi, Japan.

Source: https://www.rt.com/news/340046-kumamoto-quake-aftershock-japan/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=RSS

This is insane is it not? we do indeed seem to be heading towards a climax! and if we truly are then something big is on the horizon and hell maybe this has something to do with nibiru it is after all supposed to be here now. or passing soon!

what do you all think?

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Cali is the only place left in the ring of fire that has not had a recent quake.  Hmm. 

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1 minute ago, Full Throttle said:

Cali is the only place left in the ring of fire that has not had a recent quake.  Hmm. 

exactly why to me it seems like the most likely next target! each major one that does not hit cali just seems to increase the factor of possibility. Especially considering info on that area and its stability.

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1 minute ago, Ukshep said:

exactly why to me it seems l oikehe most likely next target! each major one that does not hit cali just seems to increase the factor of possibility. Especially considering info on that area and its stability.

Just saw a map of the quake activity and it all points to Cali, as being next in line.  Maybe for the big Mega 9.0 quake. 

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1 minute ago, Full Throttle said:

Just saw a map of the quake activity and it all points to Cali, as being next in line.  Maybe for the big Mega 9.0 quake. 

Yep. i told cinnamon to expect it in the next month but i do not know for sure. Most of my opinion is based on a dream last month which is now reinforced by recent events. and the government knows its coming. they just aint saying anything. least in my dream.

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Funny story.  

Sat night I stayed up and my wife went to bed.  I fell asleep on the couch and woke up at 3am to the couch shaking.  Well, all I've seen the last few days is about earth quakes.  I've never experienced one but it scared the crap out of me.  I jumped up and yelled out I would grab our daughter and to take cover.  

Thank goodness my wife didn't really hear me/ understand what I was saying. 

Turns out my cat was laying on the back of the couch behind me... scratching.  

I've still never experienced an earthquake.   

If it helps... I was pretty sauced which is why I fell asleep on the couch.

:earthquake:

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 Smaller Quakes are moving inland now into Japan,  mysterious behavior indeed. 

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I never experienced a quake, but if I do, I want to be drunk for it... I'm not to sure about this whole Nibiru thing, but if it is coming and we are doomed, I hope it is fast and painless..

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Unusual quake cluster worries Japan

TOKYO -- Seismic activity in southern Japan is mystifying geologists and keeping the nation on edge.

     The island of Kyushu has been struck by a series of significant earthquakes, with the epicenters moving progressively further inland. The cluster started with the deadly quakes that hit Kumamoto Prefecture last Thursday and Saturday. Temblors subsequently rocked the Mount Aso region and neighboring Oita Prefecture. 

     There is a known concentration of faults in the area. Still, experts say it is highly unusual to have a string of quakes measuring around magnitude 6 and stretching over such a vast area. The epicenter of the Oita jolt was about 100km away from the first Kumamoto quake.

     "I don't quite understand what is happening with the recent earthquakes, because it's an unfamiliar phenomenon," said Yoshihisa Iio, a professor at Kyoto University's Research Center for Earthquake Prediction.

     The Japan Meteorological Agency said it is unprecedented to have a group of large quakes in these three parts of Kyushu. Experts are divided over how far the shaking will spread and whether it could prompt more quakes centered elsewhere.

Linked faults

The Beppu-Shimabara graben -- a type of geological formation -- stretches east to west across Kyushu, through Oita and Kumamoto prefectures. A number of faults run underground. Scientists believe such concentrations of faults increase the chances of what they call earthquake swarms. When one fault shifts, causing an earthquake, it can add to the strain on other faults, triggering more tremors.

     The government's earthquake research committee attributed the magnitude-6.4 quake that hit Kumamoto last Thursday evening to a shift in the northern part of the Hinagu fault zone. The magnitude-7.3 quake that struck in the wee hours of Saturday morning occurred in the Futagawa fault zone, which runs just north of the Hinagu zone, the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan said.

     Part of the Futagawa fault zone, about 27km in length, slid by around 3.5 meters, according to the GSI.

     The government committee met on Sunday and agreed that the Futagawa zone was the culprit in the main quake. This zone, it turns out, is longer than previously thought and stretches close to Mount Aso's caldera. The committee warned local residents to brace for more aftershocks.

<snip>

http://asia.nikkei.com/Features/Kyushu-earthquakes/Unusual-quake-cluster-worries-Japan?page=1

 

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NZ is called the shaky Isles for a reason.

Aftershocks are common after a large quake. From my own personal experience the biggest quake I have felt occurred in 1991 (but before then I had probably experienced hundreds of earthquakes just because of where I lived). It was a 6.7 only 20Kms (in a straight line) from where I lived. First one hit just before midnight, second hit 7AM (most of the kids I went to school with were in the shower before going to school that day) we experienced aftershocks for 3 months afterwards, 10-20 a day at first. This is common of larger earthquakes.

 

In Christchurch NZ they have been experiencing aftershocks for years afterwards after their big ones. It is normal. The land tries to settle and tension is released until there isn't enough left to move the earth.

 

We had so many earthquakes where I lived we used to surf them. You stand on the arm of chair or sofa when they come and try and keep your footing. A lot of fun.

 

The fault line I actually live on top of now is hundreds is kilometres long and for decades they kept saying it was due for a big one 7+, but now after studying they have changed their tune a little. It is the fastest moving fault in the entire world. http://www.stuff.co.nz/science/77647999/Alpine-Fault-moves-more-than-any-other-known-land-fault-in-the-world

It has even moved in both directions significantly. (you can't quite see my house from the photos in the article, but it is within 10Kms of the second set of photos)

Because of this we don't have multi-story homes nearby nor do we have brick construction houses. We have wooden frame houses with Studs at 600mms and Dwangs at 400mm, the homes flex without breaking. In the CHCH quakes one home was cut in half as it lay across one of the rifts created on the land but both halves were still intact despite the middle being severed. We allow 2 story houses but nothing higher for residential homes. You build to what your conditions are.

 

In Japan they have mastered building tall buildings to withstand an 8 or higher as standard construction. Some of their sky scrappers have rubber ball bearings in the basements so the building can move without falling. We study a lot of what they do as they are very good at building quake resistant buildings.

 

In CHCH the damage was bad because most of the buildings that got destroyed were built before earthquake building standards were brought in. They had never had a quake there before and thought it was a quake free zone...and they learned the hard way.

 

Nothing I am seeing about these aftershock is that unusual, it is characteristic of what happens after a large quake with many aftershocks that will go on for months from now. If pressure can be released it will be...or it will build up to a larger event. After shocks are good, that usually means you won't get another big one for a while. But two large earthquakes within 6 hours of the first is not unusual in my experience, I often anticipate that.

 

After a few years of quakes you gain an instinct whether the quake you feel is building or just passing through so you know whether to floor surf it or head for a door way. I love them. A good quake gets me going every time....but those who have not felt one (I have seen several tourists lose it over a 3.2 and they thought that was scary as they hid under the table and wondered why were looked like we were trying to surf something going "Yeah man!") sometimes shit their daks (a cultural euphemism).

 

Japan is more geologically active than NZ and has more active volcanoes (we have volcanoes in the North Island, but I don't live there and the North Island could sink tomorrow for all I care) than NZ. Geological activity is not foreign to them either. Really surprised they published what they did..and not in Japanese either.

 

If I shit my pants at every earthquake cluster that occurred in the last 2 decades I wouldn't have any underwear left.

 

 

That said you might be interested in Ken Ring who predicts earthquakes by the Moon and planetary alignments. He has a good success rate but not 100% by any means, about 70% from last I heard. He also can predict rain with a high degree of accuracy using his system and many farmers go by him rather than the met office.http://www.predictweather.co.nz/

He doesn't do it for free yet still has many customers.

 

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