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New Report Predicts Over 100,000 Legal Jobs Will Be Lost To Automation

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An extensive new analysis by Deloitte estimates that over 100,000 jobs will be lost to technological automation within the next two decades. Increasing technological advances have helped replace menial roles in the office and do repetitive tasks.

A RADICAL CHANGE

To paraphrase the Bard’s famous quote: “The first thing we do, let’s replace all the lawyers with automated algorithms.”

Doesn’t have quite the same sting as the original, but it may more accurately reflect the present reality.

http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Research/Files/Blogs/2015/04/29-robots/figure1.jpg?la=en

Traditionally, the target of technological automation has been mechanical labor and factory jobs, but improvements in robotics and artificial intelligence has now caused this trend to extend beyond blue-collar jobs and into white-collar jobs, such as accounting and law.

A new analysis from Deloitte Insight states that within the next two decades, an estimated 114,00 jobs in the legal sector will have a high chance of having been replaced with automated machines and algorithms. The report predicts “profound reforms” across the legal profession with the 114,000 jobs representing over 39% of jobs in the legal sector.

http://futurism.com/new-report-predicts-over-100000-legal-jobs-would-be-lost-to-technological-automation/

March of the machines: 100,000 jobs will become obsolete by 2035 thanks to robots - and these are the towns that will suffer most...
Machine operators and plant managers most at risk, Adzuna suggests
Exeter, Crawley, Norwich and Aberdeen most at risk of automation
Official data on UK unemployment figures released on Wednesday 

https://d267cvn3rvuq91.cloudfront.net/i/images/destroying.jobs_.chart2x910.jpg

More than 100,000 jobs currently being advertised across the UK are likely to be obsolete by 2035 as automation advances and a 'robot invasion' takes over, new findings predict.
Around one in 11 jobs are at risk of being lost in 20 years time, with the cities likely to be most affected by the 'rise of the robots' including Exeter, Norwich and Plymouth, Adzuna suggests. Advances in technology mean machine operators and plant mangers are most at risk, but staff in administrative and secretarial roles also feature heavily in the 'at-risk' category, the report warns. 
The reports comes as official data today showed the unemployment rate at its lowest level in a decade last year. The number of jobless fell by 60,000 to 1.69million in the last three months of 2015 - keeping the unemployment rate at 5.1 per cent.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/02/17/11/3150139800000578-3449513-image-m-14_1455708840221.jpg


Read more: http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/news/article-3449513/These-towns-suffer-robots-make-100-000-jobs-obsolete-2035.html#ixzz43pmbGSxU
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Edited by Cinnamon
images removed/ links to images inserted
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Robots have their place like in bomb squads performing tasks that would put a human's life at great risk. The system is set up to keep people busy so they slave away for the the elite and stay out of trouble. They must have forgotten this when they outsourced the jobs to China.....unemployed people with lots of free time find ways to live outside the system or abolish it.

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