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Cinnamon

Researcher: Septic tanks to blame for pollution

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Charlotte, Florida —

Dr. Brian Lapointe told the County Commission on Tuesday failing septic tanks across the state were major contributors to the widespread contamination of Florida waterways from the Keys to Indian River Lagoon. Dr. Lapointe, a research professor at Florida Atlantic University’s Marine Ecosystem Health Program, is a leading advocate of removing and replacing septic tanks with sewer systems in Florida.

In his presentation, Dr. Lapointe said nutrient, microbial and contaminant pollution produce harmful algal blooms and contribute to the loss of seagrass and coral reef habitat and the decline of fisheries. He cited emerging diseases and mortalities in wildlife (corals, manatees, dolphins, sea turtles, pelicans, fish, shellfish) and humans. Among the harmful contaminants linked to failing septic tanks are nitrogen, phosphorus, ammonia, pharmaceuticals, hormones, viruses and bacteria, including fecal coliform.

He cited studies stretching back to the 1970s in the Keys, and, more recently, in Jupiter Creek and the Indian River Lagoon that found the highest nutrients and coliforms were near residential areas with high densities of septic tanks.

http://www.wftv.com/news/florida/researcher-septic-tanks-to-blame-for-pollution/152066409

Ok, this is probably true to some degree about septic tanks and I know it's a weird topic for a ct forum, but I can tell you that there is a concerted effort to get rid of septic systems and I think there are more nefarious reasons behind it. Having a septic system means that all you have to do is maintain it, and that requires little in the way of cash.  You don't have to pay the municipality a sewer charge.  And the most important thing about having a septic tank instead of a sewer line is that you are partially off the grid, it's a form of independence and independence is the last thing government wants you to have. I have a septic system and have done tons of research on them because I had some issues with mine.  What I found out after researching for weeks and reading everything on the net about septic tanks is this, if your leach lines and leach field is failing, reducing the amount of water that goes into it will "heal" the system.  If it worked once, it will work again.  If you stop letting water go into your lines for as little as a month or two, it will start working again because the bio mat dries up and the perforation is no longer clogged. (In case any of you all have septic tank issues, ask me! I'm an expert and if I had the physical strength I could probably build one of them all by myself!) 

Believe me if you have a septic system and it starts giving you problems you will drive yourself crazy and no one will tell you what I just did above! 

 

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Just now, Last1oftheJedi said:

Shit just got real 

 

 

lmao! It did, but I can tell you when the shit gets really real is when your tank is backing up! hahahaaaaaa

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Our old septic tank rusted away in our acidic soil (pH 5.2). Mr. grav dug it our and put up cinder blocks walls and put on a new cover. I don't think he changed pipes. The run-off goes down a sandy ravine and is completely absorbed before reaching the creek hundreds of feet away. Our Mo-dad pump still works like a champ. As for our neighbor up the hill -- I think he may run his crap straight to the creek. That may be the situation in Florida, Cinn. Homeowners who say what the hell, it's running on someone else's land. Not my problemo. Septic systems should be checked every year or so by sanitation departments.

When my nephew from California first saw our drain pipe and heard what it was, he told Mr. grav, he was a liar who was sh##ing him. Mr. grav did not take kindly to that.

By the way, the state EPA checks our water well pretty often. It's clean. It is more worrisome for oil drilling and fracking. That has shut down too, thank goodness for us. Not so good for US companies. 

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15 minutes ago, grav said:

Our old septic tank rusted away in our acidic soil (pH 5.2). Mr. grav dug it our and put up cinder blocks walls and put on a new cover. I don't think he changed pipes. The run-off goes down a sandy ravine and is completely absorbed before reaching the creek hundreds of feet away. Our Mo-dad pump still works like a champ. As for our neighbor up the hill -- I think he may run his crap straight to the creek. That may be the situation in Florida, Cinn. Homeowners who say what the hell, it's running on someone else's land. Not my problemo. Septic systems should be checked every year or so by sanitation departments.

When my nephew from California first saw our drain pipe and heard what it was, he told Mr. grav, he was a liar who was sh##ing him. Mr. grav did not take kindly to that.

By the way, the state EPA checks our water well pretty often. It's clean. It is more worrisome for oil drilling and fracking. That has shut down too, thank goodness for us. Not so good for US companies. 

My tank is concrete and the leach field is very small, when I talked to some of the septic experts they told me that the best thing you can do is pump it more often and keep the tank cleaned out so there's not so many solids going into the leach lines that causes the bio mat to build up. They also told me that putting bacterial products are not even needed, you can save almost the same amount each year in rid ex that it costs for them to pump it.  I just have it pumped out every year instead of what they recommend and no more issues. Mine doesn't have a pump. It's a really simple system. It's one of those love/hate things, owning a septic tank. When it's good, it's great, but when being bad... ugh! 

I'm sure you nephew was in culture shock, most people who live in California don't want to talk about where the stuff actually goes when they use the bathroom. lol

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Part of Florida's problem is limestone which is also responsible for sinkholes in the sunshine state. In Texas, we have clay soil that also causes problems for septic systems. If your manual system fails then you're required to install an expensive aerobic one that requires electricity. <sigh>

The attack on septic systems is just part of the attack on rural living brought to you by Agenda 21.

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Good post Cinnamon! I remember a few years ago Victoria (capitol of BC) was charging for sewer and pumping it straight into the Pacific Ocean. From your post, it seems I've been doing it right, I use CCLS to keep the tank healthy and use minimal water. We have an artesian well and water is not an issue, but when you grow up hauling every bucket you use up a steep path you tend to cherish water.

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