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BigRed

Do you buy shrimp? You might want to know about this

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Washington D.C., Mar 6, 2016 / 04:14 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- When we purchase bananas at the grocery store or eat at a seafood restaurant, we might not think twice about it.

But, many of the everyday products that we use may be the result of forced labor.

“The world is now focused on slave labor again,” said Justin Dillon, CEO of the group Made in a Free World, which seeks to inform businesses about slave and child labor in their supply chains.

Last month, a new federal law was enacted to prohibit importation of goods made with forced labor into the U.S., a big boost in the fight against labor trafficking.

Since the 1930 Tariff Act, which prohibited such importation, one clause exempted this prohibition for when “consumptive demand” required such goods be imported. Critics have argued that this exemption became a wide loophole and the law’s intent was rarely enforced, resulting in the proliferation of slave-made goods in the U.S. economy.

The Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015, passed by both parties in Congress, struck that clause, and President Barack Obama signed the act into law.

The law is a “positive step” in the fight against trafficking because it “closes a rather large loophole” and is a statement that “we as a country are against products produced by forced labor – full stop,” said Mary Leary, a human trafficking expert and law professor at The Catholic University of America.

However, she told CNA, “other problems remain about our ability/political will to investigate allegations of forced labor.”

Although it may be impossible to estimate the exact number of goods produced with forced or child labor that are available to U.S. consumers, the International Labour Organization (ILO) has provided some context.

http://right.is/religion/2016/03/do-you-buy-shrimp-you-might-want-to-know-about-this-3295.html

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This is maddening. Stores know that customers like me want to know where my dog food comes from. I don't give a damn about where it was packaged. Or its place of distribution. Much of the shrimp in Louisiana stores and restaurants come from China. By that I mean that area of the world -- Thailand, Cambodia, etc. It hurts our economy and puts American shrimpers out of business. Plus, I don't trust the quality of food from areas where flu originates, plastic ends up in baby formula, dog treats kill pets, etc.

Why won't the feds fix this law $$$$ :angry:

 

"A statement of the country of origin on the labeling of imported foods is not required by the Federal Food, Drug, & Cosmetic Act. This is a requirement of the U.S. Customs *and Border Protection (CBP)* as authorized by the Tariff Act of 1930 and CPB regulations (19 USC 1304(a) and 19 CFR Part 134).

 

Repackers are required by *CBP* to mark containers of repackaged imports with the English name of the country of origin. In the event that further reprocessing or material added to the article in another country results in a "substantial transformation" of the product, the other country becomes the country of origin within the meaning of *CBP's* labeling requirements, 19 CFR 134.1(b) and 134.11." 

http://www.fda.gov/ICECI/ComplianceManuals/CompliancePolicyGuidanceManual/ucm074567.htm

 

 

 

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I stopped eating shrimp after the Gulf Oil spill. Too much Corexit for me.

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WHAT IS THE LAOGAI SYSTEM?

The Laogai System: China’s vast system of prisons and detention facilities in which inmates are forced to labor and endure Communist Party political indoctrination.

Named after the historical laogai labor camp, which was the original prison camp system established by Mao Zedong in the early 1950s, the term “Laogai System” highlights the historical continuity of Communist Party criminal and administrative detention practices. Despite undergoing cosmetic changes, the ideology and purposes underpinning the Laogai System remain the same: to maintain the Communist Party’s monopoly on power through detaining convicted criminals and those deemed disruptive to political stability in an effort to transform them to conform to socialist ideals through forced labor and political indoctrination. As maintaining the political supremacy of the Communist Party through expediently administering punishment serves as a core function of the Laogai System, procedures used to convict detainees often fall short of international standards proscribing arbitrary detention. In addition to neutralizing potential sources of instability, throughout history, the Laogai System has provided free prison labor to construct public works projects, produce consumer goods, enrich Communist Party officials, and arguably enhance the price competitiveness of Chinese exports.

http://www.laogai.org/page/what-laogai-system

China knows how to compete! 

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Do you figure that the US learned from China, Cinnamon? And just which one is the bad guy? 

 

Quote

The Prison Industry in the United States: Big Business or a New Form of Slavery?

http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-prison-industry-in-the-united-states-big-business-or-a-new-form-of-slavery/8289

 

Human rights organizations, as well as political and social ones, are condemning what they are calling a new form of inhumane exploitation in the United States, where they say a prison population of up to 2 million – mostly Black and Hispanic – are working for various industries for a pittance. For the tycoons who have invested in the prison industry, it has been like finding a pot of gold. They don’t have to worry about strikes or paying unemployment insurance, vacations or comp time. All of their workers are full-time, and never arrive late or are absent because of family problems; moreover, if they don’t like the pay of 25 cents an hour and refuse to work, they are locked up in isolation cells.

There are approximately 2 million inmates in state, federal and private prisons throughout the country. According to California Prison Focus, “no other society in human history has imprisoned so many of its own citizens.”

The figures show that the United States has locked up more people than any other country: a half million more than China, which has a population five times greater than the U.S. Statistics reveal that the United States holds 25% of the world’s prison population, but only 5% of the world’s people. From less than 300,000 inmates in 1972, the jail population grew to 2 million by the year 2000. In 1990 it was one million. Ten years ago there were only five private prisons in the country, with a population of 2,000 inmates; now, there are 100, with 62,000 inmates. It is expected that by the coming decade, the number will hit 360,000, according to reports.

 

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1 minute ago, puddle said:

Do you figure that the US learned from China, Cinnamon? And just which one is the bad guy? 

 

 

Is this a competition to you? I guess you condone China's actions and condemn the U.S. only? If not, it sure appears that way! 

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1 minute ago, Cinnamon said:

Is this a competition to you? I guess you condone China's actions and condemn the U.S. only? If not, it sure appears that way! 

China are supposed to be the bad guys, while the US are supposed to be the good guys. Now you are telling me they are equals. 

 

"The Laogai System: China’s vast system of prisons and detention facilities in which inmates are forced to labor and endure Communist Party political indoctrination."

 

That sounds like the life sentence, TV, etc., all Americans are given. 

 

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1 minute ago, puddle said:

China are supposed to be the bad guys, while the US are supposed to be the good guys. Now you are telling me they are equals. 

 

"The Laogai System: China’s vast system of prisons and detention facilities in which inmates are forced to labor and endure Communist Party political indoctrination."

 

That sounds like the life sentence, TV, etc., all Americans are given. 

 

Who said China is supposed to the be bad guys and the U.S. are supposed to be the good guys?  That might be your philosophy, but it certainly isn't mine. There is no need for projecting your ideology onto me.  

Are you saying that China does not imprison and detain or use slave labor?  

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Just now, Cinnamon said:

Who said China is supposed to the be bad guys and the U.S. are supposed to be the good guys?  That might be your philosophy, but it certainly isn't mine. There is no need for projecting your ideology onto me.  

 

The sum total of US propaganda. 

 

Quote

Are you saying that China does not imprison and detain or use slave labor?  

Nope, I'm not into denying reality. You ought to be addressing that same question to many others here; "Are you saying that the US does not imprison and detain or use slave labor?"

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Just now, puddle said:

The sum total of US propaganda. 

 

Nope, I'm not into denying reality. You ought to be addressing that same question to many others here; "Are you saying that the US does not imprison and detain or use slave labor?"

Apparently you are, since you seem incapable of acknowledgment that any other country is guilty of atrocities, other than the U.S. I'm probably the poster who put up info about the Prison Industrial Complex in the U.S. months ago. After reading my post on how the U.S.operates, I just can't understand why you keep pretending that I condone any of these actions. Unless you get your fun out of rubbing it in. 

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A lot of low end clothing too.

Gap and Old Navy in Bangladesh: cheating the poorest workers in the world

What Gap Says Is Not What Old Navy Does

In fact, Gap and Old Navy appear to have no idea what is going on at the Next Collections Limited factory — part of the massive Ha-Meem Group in Bangladesh — where their  garments are being sewn.  And this despite the fact that Gap and Old Navy appear to account for 70 percent of total production at the factory!

If Gap/Old Navy have deployed “corporate monitors” to audit working conditions, hours and wages at the Next Collections factory, we urge Gap to release its audit reports.  We can, however, inform Gap and Old Navy that the 3,750 workers at the Next Collections Limited factory in Ashulia are routinely forced to work over 100 hours a week, while being shortchanged of their legal wages — which are already well below subsistence levels.

Gap is in violation of its own code of conduct and these abuses have been going on for more than two and a half years.

The giant Ha-Meem Group, with its 26 factories, including Next Collections, and well over 30,000 garment workers, is in serious violation of Bangladesh’s labor laws and the International Labour Organization’s internationally recognized worker rights standards.  Across the giant Ha-Meem Group of garment factories, workers are being routinely cheated of approximately 15 percent of their legal overtime wages.  In this report, we provide documentation to confirm these serious violations.

http://www.globallabourrights.org/reports/gap-and-old-navy-in-bangladesh-cheating-the-poorest-workers-in-the-world

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