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DarkKnightNomeD

Venezuela Declares Another Emergency: It Has Run Out of Food

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Surprised no one caught this yesterday.

Venezuela Declares Another Emergency: It Has Run Out of Food

http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2016/02/12/venezuela-has-run-out-of-food/

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Venezuela’s opposition legislature has declared a “nutritional emergency,” proclaiming that the country simply does not have enough food to feed its population. The move comes after years of socialist rationing and shortages that forced millions to wait on lines lasting as long as six hours for a pint of milk, a bag of flour, or carton of cooking oil.

LOL I had to stop right there.......... hahahhahahha

that was the PUN - after years of socialist rationing and shortages that

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When Chavez was killed ... oops, I mean when he died from cancer ... the vultures flew in to feast on the country. Maybe "vultures" isn't the precise analogy, but I don't know of any animal that eats oil. 

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But..but.. Socialism can do no wrong! You know what we should just send Bernie! He'll fix everything! He'll show'em what they did wrong! ? 

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Venzuela has been suffering food shortages for several years now. How people can starve with such knowlege of agriculture and a mild climate to grow year round like they have is totally ridiculous. They started importing everything and producing nothing, that's how this happens, just like in the U.S., when it's cheaper to import than to grow it or make it. 

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Fingerprints For Food: Venezuela Shows How Not To Use Biometrics

Biometric scanners are hardly a novelty these days, but how the data they generate can be used is still controversial. Here's a good example from Venezuela of how function creep there has turned fingerprint readers into instruments of pervasive surveillance:

In Caracas or Maracaibo' supermarkets and drugstores, buying a kilogram of grain or a pack of cookies has become a complex procedure: it's required for you to deliver an ID, full name, phone number, address, date of birth and to slide both thumbs in a device: the emblematic "fingerprint scanner"; a device which usage by stores was originally voluntary, but which evolution, months afterwards, is one of omnipresent machinery, kind of a necessary toll for the acquisition of a simple pack of gum in any chain store.

As a post on the Digital Rights in Latin America and the Caribbean blog explains, the Food Safety Biometric System was supposed to be a boon for citizens, ending Venezuela's food and medicine shortage. Not only has it failed to do that, it has helped create one of the world's most complete and intrusive population profile databases:

Along with biometric and personal data requested to the customers at the moment of the purchase, stores are obliged to preserve a great deal of information regarding the transaction, demanded by the government's tax collector. The extend [sic] of the databases that the Venezuelan government possesses regarding their citizens would be heaven for any big data analyst. With enough computer skills, it wouldn't be difficult to establish a detailed profile of every Venezuelan citizen, starting from data such as address, the places where he shops, how much money he expends and the products he acquires. Nevertheless, no one outside of the government possesses the capability to know if ... systems are intertwined, or where this huge quantity of information is stored, much less what's the policy for its retention and storage.

That would be worrying anywhere; in Venezuela, it's doubly so, because of the country's experience with something called the Tascón List:

a list of millions of signatures of Venezuelans who petitioned in 2003 and 2004 for the recall of the President of Venezuela, Hugo Chávez, a petition which ultimately led to the Venezuelan recall referendum, 2004, in which the recall was defeated. The list, published online by National Assembly member Luis Tascón, is used by the Venezuelan government to discriminate against those who have signed against Chávez. The government also claimed some private firms were using the list to discriminate in favour of petitioners.

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20160104/09480933242/fingerprints-food-venezuela-shows-how-not-to-use-biometrics.shtml

Remember my warning about connecting data bases. Here it is in full force in Venezuela. 

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Venezuela used to be famous for its beef. Same here. Where I live people used to have dairies, cattle ranches, truck farms.  The Ag people stopped all that. Now we have loblolly pine plantations everywhere. County agents talk people into growing trees for toilet paper and 2 x4's. I don't object to that, but it's like corn fields in Illinois. All the other vegetation is wiped out -- hardwoods, grasslands, swamps, and other habitats for wildlife, like bobwhite quail. It's  called a green desert, like the All-American lawn, which is actually a European style which is eco-unfriendly. 

I had NO bees last spring. No pollinators for my fruit trees and blackberries. We're killing our native bees (which are not the European species which make honey). 

Everyone here thinks I'm a diehard flatearther. And I am. But I am much more an environmentalist. If we lose our native bees, we are doomed. The Ag powers-that-be seem intent on killing all our bees and other beneficial insects. Thanks to them, we are also losing our native ladybugs, which are becoming extinct, while the Asian lady beetle is becoming a horrible pest. Ag idiots also imported exotic aphids and beetles, one of which attacks pines, which means they aerial spray to control it, which kills our bees and butterflies.

Do ya see a pattern here? As usual, the rich get richer, the government controls the land and water, and the land suffers. 

One of these days, Big Ag will meet a corn disease or wheat fungus, or long drought -- and the factory farm system will crash. People will re-learn a thing that is always a few weeks away -- famine, plague, depopulation.

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19 hours ago, Cinnamon said:

Venzuela has been suffering food shortages for several years now. How people can starve with such knowlege of agriculture and a mild climate to grow year round like they have is totally ridiculous.

Several years ago the gov began taking 30 - 50% of what the farmers produced at a price the gov decided. Not much incentive to farm.

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20 hours ago, Cinnamon said:

Venzuela has been suffering food shortages for several years now. How people can starve with such knowlege of agriculture and a mild climate to grow year round like they have is totally ridiculous. They started importing everything and producing nothing, that's how this happens, just like in the U.S., when it's cheaper to import than to grow it or make it. 

But the hemp and poppy grow? There is apparently more money in feeding people drugs than there is in feeding them actual food!

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13 minutes ago, FalkeAuge said:

But the hemp and poppy grow? There is apparently more money in feeding people drugs than there is in feeding them actual food!

Yes, there is but short term only. Drugs will quickly kill off your market but necessities sustain your market. So the countries moving toward sustainable agriculture and industry will be the emerging powers.

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3 minutes ago, Brio said:

Yes, there is but short term only. Drugs will quickly kill off your market but necessities sustain your market. So the countries moving toward sustainable agriculture and industry will be the emerging powers.

True, that is why I made the remark - these fools have not yet worked that one out.

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2 minutes ago, FalkeAuge said:

True, that is why I made the remark - these fools have not yet worked that one out.

Oh they know it, they just want theirs now, as much as they can grab, and to hell with everyone else.

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