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Cinnamon

10 Commandments Of Survival You Need To Know About

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http://www.activistpost.com/2016/01/10-commandments-of-survival-you-need-to-know-about.html

By Gaye Levy

 

These days, it’s easy to go about our business of survival and preparedness without stopping to think about the rules of engagement. For most of us, these rules are not written or spoken, but are simply something that has evolved over a period of time.

 

As I have expressed many times in the past, the burden of knowledge, or perhaps I should say theburden of truth and knowledge, can be a huge weight to bear. That, coupled with the crazy busy task of life during these uncertain times, can be overwhelming. Getting up each day, going to work, doing chores, balancing the checkbook, taking care of family members – it’s all a big job.  Add prepping and learning new survival skills to the mix and you have a recipe for exhaustion – and perhaps even a bit of depression and gloom.

 

To help overcome my own dizzying sense of having too much to do and too much to prepare for, I sat down a couple of years ago and attempted to put my own rules for survival into words. I called these words the “10 commandments of survival.” At the time, they brought focus and meaning to preparing for hard times.

Now, two years later, I find they still apply.  I am bringing them back newly updated as a reminder of why we prep as defined by the prepping rules of engagement.

 

Commandment #1: Have the will to live, no matter what.

Having the will to live requires a strong sense of self-preservation and is something we must all work at on a daily basis. To fall into despondency will sabotage our efforts to prepare for that time when supplies are short, when chaos rules the streets or when economic collapse has bankrupted the world.

Now I am not saying that any or all of these things will happen. But on my own risk-meter, these things are right there at the top along with a regional natural disaster such as an earthquake.  The only question is when.

 

Commandment #2: Be self-sufficient and self-reliant, without wanting or needing excessive government assistance.

When chaos reigns the land or a natural disaster strikes, we need to do our darndest to take care of ourselves. We need to have our own food, our own source of clean, purified water, our own medical supplies, and most important, a robust skill set that will allow us to live quite comfortably without electricity or petroleum products.

 

There will still be a need for government assistance but that assistance should go to those that are truly needy through no fault of their own. That includes the wounded, the sick, the working poor, the elderly, children, and the disabled. This may be a pipe dream but in my sense of right and wrong, taking care of the truly needy is something that governments should do provided that these same people have gone as far as they can to take of themselves.

 

Commandment #3: Seek knowledge as a solution to problems.

There are so many free or almost free sources of information these days but the tough part is determining who is credible and who is not. Luckily, it is pretty easy to  vet the reliable members of the alternative press.  These reporters attempt to tell the news without fear-mongering and without getting you to spend money (unless you want to of course).

 

Even before seeking knowledge as a solution, some effort has to be put into both identifying and prioritizing of the problems at hand. Why not identify five or six problems and find good solid solutions to those before moving on to the next group?

 

While we still have a reliable power grid, download free e-books or visit survival and homesteading websites to pick up skills. Take advantage of the wealth of DIY information at your local library for free.  Learn do-it-yourself skills, then continue to practice and to drill and to learn some more.

Turn problems into solutions by using knowledge as your tool.

 

Commandment #4: Adapt to the surroundings, wherever they may be.

As comfortable as we may be in our homes, the time may come when you have to evacuate and leave. Your house may get destroyed in a natural disaster such as a hurricane, flood or earthquake. Or, due to the woes of the economy and unexpected unemployment, you may have to sell the four-bedroom ranch house and move to a modest apartment.

 

The house in which you live is built of sticks and cement and bricks and mortar. Your home, on the other hand, is where ever you happen to live and, if you are lucky, where you are surrounded by loved ones, even if they are the four-legged type.

 

Learning to adapt to your surroundings – the people, the geography, and the social milieu – will allow you to embrace change as an adventure even when the causative circumstances may not be pleasant.  And that all translates into less stress.

 

Commandment #5: Embrace decisiveness as a core value.

Avoiding a decision when the choices are poor to begin with leads to complacency and, even worse, doing nothing. On the other hand, making a decision and then pursuing that decision with decisiveness and gusto will likely lead to positive results. Sure, the result may not be perfect, but the willingness to make decisions, even in the face of uncertainty, means you are taking responsibility for your actions and for the outcome of your decision.

 

And right or wrong, you will learn from the experience. Doing nothing is simply not acceptable.

<snip>

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I think the most important prep is to know who you can trust, and form groups of people with a variety of skills. One person can't do it all. You need people who recognize and grow medicinal herbs, people who know how to forge metal, people who understand the great importance of sanitation in preventing disease, etc.

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I saw a news story yesterday about the poor people in Hawaii. Hawaiians used to live off the land and fish. Their lifestyle was simple. THEN the MIC took over.

I have a lot of respect for indigenous people who resist the forces that want to "modernize" the world. That really means this: you ignorant barbarians, forget your survival skills and work in a factory or sweat shop for chump change. Here, learn how to make useless widgets. Move into an apartment building and aspire to be rich and have a big house in the burbs. Pay taxes, watch tv, buy products.

Teotwawki will find the survivors scrambling to relearn the old ways. That includes mental readiness.

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The most basic preps are food shelter and water independent of external control. If you have that, you can focus on the rest. Without that, the rest is useless.

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6 minutes ago, grav said:

I saw a news story yesterday about the poor people in Hawaii. Hawaiians used to live off the land and fish. Their lifestyle was simple. THEN the MIC took over.

I have a lot of respect for indigenous people who resist the forces that want to "modernize" the world. That really means this: you ignorant barbarians, forget your survival skills and work in a factory or sweat shop for chump change. Here, learn how to make useless widgets. Move into an apartment building and aspire to be rich and have a big house in the burbs. Pay taxes, watch tv, buy products.

Teotwawki will find the survivors scrambling to relearn the old ways. That includes mental readiness.

But eventually people need to do more than just survive. If they spend all their time surviving from one day to the next, they have no time for dreaming, inventing, improving... the motives that led to industrialization and modern life. And people who aren't educated beyond survival have no time or mental training to rebel against a powerful tyrant. Sometimes I think this is one of the reasons there's so much push for living off the land; peasants don't revolt with any force to match tyrants, who see to it that they have slaves building massive weapons and armies. As long as there's anyone in the world who masses an army, people just surviving won't stand a chance.

I'm not saying we shouldn't be self-sufficient, but that we shouldn't be naive. History is replete with the cycle of tyranny, collapse, anarchy, recovery, decay, and back to tyranny. Even after the world blows itself up and there's a few million survivors, eventually someone will rise up and start taking other people's land.

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29 minutes ago, Challenger said:

But eventually people need to do more than just survive. If they spend all their time surviving from one day to the next, they have no time for dreaming, inventing, improving... the motives that led to industrialization and modern life. And people who aren't educated beyond survival have no time or mental training to rebel against a powerful tyrant. Sometimes I think this is one of the reasons there's so much push for living off the land; peasants don't revolt with any force to match tyrants, who see to it that they have slaves building massive weapons and armies. As long as there's anyone in the world who masses an army, people just surviving won't stand a chance.

I'm not saying we shouldn't be self-sufficient, but that we shouldn't be naive. History is replete with the cycle of tyranny, collapse, anarchy, recovery, decay, and back to tyranny. Even after the world blows itself up and there's a few million survivors, eventually someone will rise up and start taking other people's land.

Yes, living off the land and respecting nature doesn't mean you have to be illiterate. Has there ever been an agrarian culture, or hunter-gatherers, who were educated in the real sense of the word?

Not a rhetorical question. I can't think of any. Even in ancient Greece and Rome, the ordinary people couldn't read. 

I guess I'm asking if the simple lifestyle, like the Amish, is compatible with the pursuit of knowledge. My guess is no. And I'm not talking solely about human nature. Tptb will not allow it.

The Village, a movie made some years ago, showed a group of people who, uh, well, I don't want to give away the plot. It's worth watching if you've never seen it.

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12 minutes ago, grav said:

Yes, living off the land and respecting nature doesn't mean you have to be illiterate. Has there ever been an agrarian culture, or hunter-gatherers, who were educated in the real sense of the word?

Not a rhetorical question. I can't think of any. Even in ancient Greece and Rome, the ordinary people couldn't read. 

I guess I'm asking if the simple lifestyle, like the Amish, is compatible with the pursuit of knowledge. My guess is no. And I'm not talking solely about human nature. Tptb will not allow it.

The Village, a movie made some years ago, showed a group of people who, uh, well, I don't want to give away the plot. It's worth watching if you've never seen it.

That's the thing, we have to look beyond mere survival, and not think that there won't be roving gangs trying to put us back under their power. We can't be content to live off the land and think people will suddenly become peaceful. There will always be people bent on conquest, and the lower our own technology and manufacturing capability, the easier we'll be to defeat.

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Knowledge weighs nothing! 

Great informative post! Always love reading about this stuff. But it seems no matter how hard I try to live more self sufficient some bs happens around here and I still have to go to the store. I love to hunt however I haven't seen anything this year from my spots, really the only deer I've seen was while driving down the road. But anyway I know if I were to get one my fiancé would freak out at the sight of blood even tho she says if forced she could deal with it, I think I know better than that. Growing up in the Scouts I loved the self sufficiency they taught, I had a garden at the house that dad helped my with and everything. But now as an adult it just seems so difficult to even start one. I think I need to go back down to beginner level and just restart. 2016 new year and a new start here towards self sufficiency, yep that's my resolution. 

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27 minutes ago, Groove said:

Knowledge weighs nothing! 

Great informative post! Always love reading about this stuff. But it seems no matter how hard I try to live more self sufficient some bs happens around here and I still have to go to the store. I love to hunt however I haven't seen anything this year from my spots, really the only deer I've seen was while driving down the road. But anyway I know if I were to get one my fiancé would freak out at the sight of blood even tho she says if forced she could deal with it, I think I know better than that. Growing up in the Scouts I loved the self sufficiency they taught, I had a garden at the house that dad helped my with and everything. But now as an adult it just seems so difficult to even start one. I think I need to go back down to beginner level and just restart. 2016 new year and a new start here towards self sufficiency, yep that's my resolution. 

No one can ever have everything they need all the time, I guess that's where some bartering would come in to play. And if it got really bad, people would need to get together and grow different things so they could trade their food. I figured out that I MIGHT be able to eat bugs, but only if they're fried. lol 

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Hunger is the best sauce :wink:

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18 minutes ago, Brio said:

Hunger is the best sauce :wink:

This is true. As much as I hate certain foods, if I'm truly hungry they taste pretty good! 

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Posted (edited)

17 hours ago, Cinnamon said:

No one can ever have everything they need all the time, I guess that's where some bartering would come in to play. And if it got really bad, people would need to get together and grow different things so they could trade their food. I figured out that I MIGHT be able to eat bugs, but only if they're fried. lol 

Lol no worm burgers for me unless it's a last resort. Eh I may be able to do it again if forced to. 

Edited by Groove

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