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Fourth echelon

New study details Atlantic Ocean 'dead zones'

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KIEL, Germany, May 4 (UPI) -- Dead zones are large expanses of oxygen deprived water where little to no life can survive. In a newly published study, researchers from Germany and Canada describe a number of dead zones recently identified in the tropical North Atlantic.

As detailed in the new paper -- published this week in Biogeosciences, the open access journal of the European Geosciences Union -- the concentrations of oxygen-deficient water develop in eddies. The swirling dead zones accumulate more lifeless water as they churn slowly westward across the open ocean. Their structure is similar to that of a hurricane.

"The fast rotation of the eddies makes it very difficult to exchange oxygen across the boundary between the rotating current and the surrounding ocean," Johannes Karstensen, a researcher at the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, in Germany, explained in a press release. "Moreover, the circulation creates a very shallow layer -- of a few tens of meters -- on top of the swirling water that supports intense plant growth."

http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2015/05/04/New-study-details-Atlantic-Ocean-dead-zones/5421430768367/?spt=sec&or=sn

 
 
 
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Every body of water on the planet is now contaminated!! 

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This is really bad.
Fish is the main staple food in many places.
World consumption of fish has steadily increased in the last forty years.

"The total food fish supply and hence consumption has been growing at a rate of 3.6% per year since 1961, while the world’s population has been expanding at 1.8% per year. The proteins derived from fish, crustaceans and molluscs account for between 13.8% and 16.5% of the animal protein intake of the human population. The average apparent per capita consumption increased from about 9 kg per year in the early 1960s to 16 kg in 1997. The per capita availability of fish and fishery products has therefore nearly doubled in 40 years, outpacing population growth.
As well as income-related variations, the role of fish in nutrition shows marked continental, regional and national differences. In industrialized countries, where diets generally contain a more diversified range of animal proteins, a rise in per capita provision from 19.7 kg to 27.7 kg seems to have occurred. This represents a growth rate close to 1% per year. In this group of countries, fish contributed an increasing share of total protein intake until 1989 (accounting for between 6.5% and 8.5%), but since then its importance has gradually declined and, in 1997, its percentage contribution was back to the level prevailing in the mid-1980s. In the early 1960s, per capita fish supply in low-income food-deficit countries was, on average, only 30% of that of the richest countries. This gap has been gradually reduced, such that in 1997, average fish consumption in these countries was 70% of that of the more affluent economies. Despite the relatively low consumption by weight in low-income food-deficit countries, the contribution of fish to total animal protein intake is considerable (nearly 20%). Over the past four decades, however, the share of fish proteins in animal proteins has declined slightly, because of faster growth in the consumption of other animal products."

http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/3_foodconsumption/en/index5.html

 

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KIEL, Germany, May 4 (UPI) -- Dead zones are large expanses of oxygen deprived water where little to no life can survive. In a newly published study, researchers from Germany and Canada describe a number of dead zones recently identified in the tropical North Atlantic.

As detailed in the new paper -- published this week in Biogeosciences, the open access journal of the European Geosciences Union -- the concentrations of oxygen-deficient water develop in eddies. The swirling dead zones accumulate more lifeless water as they churn slowly westward across the open ocean. Their structure is similar to that of a hurricane.

"The fast rotation of the eddies makes it very difficult to exchange oxygen across the boundary between the rotating current and the surrounding ocean," Johannes Karstensen, a researcher at the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, in Germany, explained in a press release. "Moreover, the circulation creates a very shallow layer -- of a few tens of meters -- on top of the swirling water that supports intense plant growth."

http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2015/05/04/New-study-details-Atlantic-Ocean-dead-zones/5421430768367/?spt=sec&or=sn

 
 
 

​Is there even a such thing as a Tropical "North" Atlantic?

Edited by Cryptic Mole

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