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roadtoad2

all bluefin tuna caught in california is radioactive

7 posts in this topic

37 minutes ago, roadtoad2 said:

No it's really not. I'm just wondering when the large number of cases of cancers are gonna start appearing. I mean it's only a matter of time before mass quantities of people start developing cancers from this little event. 

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41 minutes ago, Quick1966 said:

No it's really not. I'm just wondering when the large number of cases of cancers are gonna start appearing. I mean it's only a matter of time before mass quantities of people start developing cancers from this little event. 

I'm holding out for my extra limbs and eyes ;-)

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35 minutes ago, BlueHawK said:

I'm holding out for my extra limbs and eyes ;-)

Lol! Brings a whole new meaning to the phrase " four eyes" huh!

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I'm glad I don't like seafood. I see people that buy fish and they're always complaining of where it comes from, specifically China.

 

Where it comes from would be the least of my worries, all sea life at some point is going to be affected by the FUKishima event for the next couple of hundred thousand years.

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8 hours ago, Quick1966 said:

Lol! Brings a whole new meaning to the phrase " four eyes" huh!

i may wear glasses but thats a good one lol

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11 hours ago, Quick1966 said:

No it's really not. I'm just wondering when the large number of cases of cancers are gonna start appearing. I mean it's only a matter of time before mass quantities of people start developing cancers from this little event. 

This is from last year in Washington state and I haven't heard a thing about since.

Mysterious cluster of birth defects stumps doctors

In her 30-year career as a nurse, Sara Barron had seen only two babies with anencephaly, a tragic birth defect in which infants are born missing parts of their brain and skull.
Then in 2012, while working at a hospital in rural Washington state, she saw two cases in two months.
To see that many in such a small hospital seemed bizarre to her.
Barron mentioned the unusual spike to an obstetrician friend working at another hospital 30 miles away. That doctor had just seen a case of anencephaly, too.
That's it, Barron thought to herself. She called the state Department of Health and made a report.
http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/01/health/cohen-birth-defects/

 

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