Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Guitar Doc

19 years today

12 posts in this topic

Today is my 19th wedding anniversary. I am 42. It feels strange to think I have nearly been married half of my life.

Many of my friends couldn't work out why I wanted to get married. I think some thought my wife must have been pregnant or something. 90% of those people are also 42 and they are still not married and possibly not likely to ever get married. Good looks don't last, and all the good people worth marring get snapped up pretty quickly I think. I remember one older lady telling young women "Men are like a box of chocolates, avoid the nuts and the ones people have tried and put back."

 

The best advise I got on marriage was "you can grow together or you can grow apart."

 

My wife's employer has nicely given her the day off today.

I will catch up with you guys tomorrow.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats! We celebrated our 26th a few months ago.

I think a lot of people get married to a "life of the party" and then get disappointed when the party's over. Most of life is mundane and repetitive, so your mate needs to be someone who still wants to be with you even then, or when you're sick or hurt. Knowing this person has your back and can be trusted is a "keeper" quality.

Hope you have a great day, and another 19 years at least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Challenger said:

Congrats! We celebrated our 26th a few months ago.

I think a lot of people get married to a "life of the party" and then get disappointed when the party's over. Most of life is mundane and repetitive, so your mate needs to be someone who still wants to be with you even then, or when you're sick or hurt. Knowing this person has your back and can be trusted is a "keeper" quality.

Hope you have a great day, and another 19 years at least.

I married my best friend. She still is. We have many common bonds, but a love of books was what drew us together long before we got together. I used to walk her to school (she is a year older than me) sometimes discussing and swapping novels. It has been good. I used to be the primary wage earner now she is. A life of being a mum is good but after many years women feel the need to be something else I have noticed. These days I get to be the "kitchen bitch" and do all the household tasks and all my wife has to do is work and come home knowing everything is sorted.

A lot of people don't understand the role reversal, but older women in their 60's or over usually spontaneously give me a hug and tell me what a wonderful man I am upon hearing my domestic arrangements.

 

My wife works in the NZ dairy industry. Worked her way up from the bottom to the top over 5 and half years. She is damn good at her job.

We are working towards a farm of our own run as a self sustaining unit. The only expenses will be internet and phone if we do it right. (and domestics like cleaning products)  We will generate our own power and make our own fuel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just preparing the preliminaries for dinner, so I have a few minutes before the cheese cake base is set.

Home made Cheese cake. (my buddy taught me this one when we were 16)

250 grams of cream cheese

One 395 gram can of Condensed Milk

One packet of plain biscuits  and butter to set as well as some cinnamon as the base.

One packet of jelly (jello for US people)

 

 

Crush biscuits add some cinnamon and about 70 grams of melted butter.  Put in lined container, allow some refrigeration to set.

Mix cream cheese and condensed milk with a mixer. Previously have one packet of jelly of your preferred flavour dissolved in slightly less than one cup of hot water. When it appears to be near gelling add to cream cheese condensed milk mixture and mix then spread on biscuit base. Too easy, allow to set.

 

I could have taken my wife out to dinner, but we live in the sticks and it is at least 150Kms to get to good dining place, then you have the drive back. Usually all I do is suss out how to make the meals they are serving me anyway and make my own at home some time later.

Tonight's main is roast chicken with traditional mixed herbs, onion and bread stuff along with a selection of roast vegetables and some steamed vegetables.

Not to mention a jelly for the kids  and some canned fruit along with the cheese cake. (should be some left for breakfast the next day)

 

I have always lived a fairly simple life, so a good well cooked meal and good company has always satisfied me.

 

Right I better get back to the cheese cake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Guitar Doc said:

I married my best friend. She still is. We have many common bonds, but a love of books was what drew us together long before we got together. I used to walk her to school (she is a year older than me) sometimes discussing and swapping novels. It has been good. I used to be the primary wage earner now she is. A life of being a mum is good but after many years women feel the need to be something else I have noticed. These days I get to be the "kitchen bitch" and do all the household tasks and all my wife has to do is work and come home knowing everything is sorted.

A lot of people don't understand the role reversal, but older women in their 60's or over usually spontaneously give me a hug and tell me what a wonderful man I am upon hearing my domestic arrangements.

 

My wife works in the NZ dairy industry. Worked her way up from the bottom to the top over 5 and half years. She is damn good at her job.

We are working towards a farm of our own run as a self sustaining unit. The only expenses will be internet and phone if we do it right. (and domestics like cleaning products)  We will generate our own power and make our own fuel.

That's a great illustration of what marriage is meant to be: partnership, teamwork, each one supporting the other. That really is something special.

Kudos to your wife as well!

We started out both working and going to school, but when our first child came, I wanted to stay home with him so we consolidated expenses and got on a strict budget. Eventually we had another child, and I home schooled both of them in the early grades. Then when a good charter school opened up nearby, I had more time during the day and taught myself web design, coding, hosting, and anything else web-related. Never made enough to support the family, but it sure has helped, and it keeps me feeling useful. Sometimes it can be a drag to think one's life is all about household chores and such, but it's worked out for us. My husband's job allows me the time to be online and do a lot of writing and research, things I've always wanted to do most of the time. It isn't glamorous or prestigious, but it's kind of my dream come true. The downside is that most of the household chores are my job since I have the time, but hey, it sure beats having to work for someone else.

We'd both love to be on a self-sustaining property, but we're in our 50s and have arthritis, and with the kids still in school there would be too much physical work for us to do. We might have made a go of it had we been able to start a decade ago. At least I could make our bread and I know how to build wood gas stoves. My husband can fix just about anything, but he's got too many problems with his back and knees.

Look up some natural recipes for cleaning products, I know there's plenty of ideas out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Challenger said:

That's a great illustration of what marriage is meant to be: partnership, teamwork, each one supporting the other. That really is something special.

Kudos to your wife as well!

We started out both working and going to school, but when our first child came, I wanted to stay home with him so we consolidated expenses and got on a strict budget. Eventually we had another child, and I home schooled both of them in the early grades. Then when a good charter school opened up nearby, I had more time during the day and taught myself web design, coding, hosting, and anything else web-related. Never made enough to support the family, but it sure has helped, and it keeps me feeling useful. Sometimes it can be a drag to think one's life is all about household chores and such, but it's worked out for us. My husband's job allows me the time to be online and do a lot of writing and research, things I've always wanted to do most of the time. It isn't glamorous or prestigious, but it's kind of my dream come true. The downside is that most of the household chores are my job since I have the time, but hey, it sure beats having to work for someone else.

We'd both love to be on a self-sustaining property, but we're in our 50s and have arthritis, and with the kids still in school there would be too much physical work for us to do. We might have made a go of it had we been able to start a decade ago. At least I could make our bread and I know how to build wood gas stoves. My husband can fix just about anything, but he's got too many problems with his back and knees.

Look up some natural recipes for cleaning products, I know there's plenty of ideas out there.

You must have been reading my mind.

 

I am a better house keeper than my wife, but now I understand the housewife syndrome.

I just give her what I would have liked when I was working and she now says "Now I know why you never felt like helping out in the weekends". The role reversal has helped us understand each other even more. My youngest kids still have another 7 years of school and then I will be back on the work (I prefer to work for myself, I am a bit fussy) but I still do work from home between the hours of school.

 

I am a bit of a jack of all trades thanks to my grandfathers who lived in the days in NZ where you had to make things for yourself because products were not commonly available. Bother were welders, one was from a line of blacksmiths and bards and the other was a master mechanic engineer and master electrician. They taught me "If someone else can do it then you can do it too." Not always as good at first.

I never found that one thing I burned to do with a passion when I was younger so I didn't waste my time doing some career I wouldn't love. Having a fear of failure and a fear of success wasn't helpful either. These days there is one thing that spins my wheels, but I need a little more practise and better typing skills. My first career was as an actor and drama teacher. I was told I could have been famous, but that wasn't what I desired either, I could see the pitfalls for someone like me in that. It would have eaten me.

 

Right, time to stuff the chicken.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats! Hope the cheescake was good. My hub makes a delicious raspberry one. We just blew past 21 years last month. Damn I feel old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Lilly said:

Congrats! Hope the cheescake was good. My hub makes a delicious raspberry one. We just blew past 21 years last month. Damn I feel old.

Thanks.

 

The cheese cake was The Bomb. I have left my kids a piece each for breakfast. I had a great day, so did my wife. Plotting tomorrow as we speak.

I am waiting for fret wire to turn up so I can refret my other love. Hopefully it will be a full day tomorrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lucky kids! I'm glad you had a great day - we need fun times with all of the doom and gloom around.

Is refretting a tricky thing? My son could do with replacing his, but he's worried he'll mess it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Lilly said:

Lucky kids! I'm glad you had a great day - we need fun times with all of the doom and gloom around.

Is refretting a tricky thing? My son could do with replacing his, but he's worried he'll mess it up.

It can be tricky. I just did my bass. Getting them out requires a tool or the adaptation of a pair of pliers. Putting them back in you have to be careful not to mark the fingerboard.

The tricky part is filing the overhanging edges or even worse (as with my vintage Neil Diamond Les Paul copy) if you have a binding on the edge which means you have to shape the frets perfectly before fitting them in.

There is a range of styles and heights of frets as well. Most people replace them with the same style they removed.

Tell him if he wants to do a really good job, practise on an old crappy one first and every problem he might have will become apparent before he does it on his good one. Only $30NZD for the fret wire to do a whole guitar where I live. Would probably cost at least $200NZD to get a Guitar Doctor to do the job for you. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Practising on an old one is a great idea! Why didn't I think of that?? Thank you :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Restore formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.