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'Unusual' Michigan earthquake near Galesburg second strongest on record in state

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Mlive news Kalamazoo

 
 
    
By Ryan Shek | rshek@mlive.com
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on May 02, 2015 at 3:33 PM, updated May 02, 2015 at 4:38 PM

GALESBURG, MI -- The earthquake centered in Kalamazoo County that shook Michigan and was felt in other Midwestern states early Saturday afternoon was the strongest in more than 60 years and second strongest on record in Michigan.

On Aug. 10, 1947, an earthquake measuring 4.6 on the Richter scale had its epicenter near Coldwater, near the Michigan-Indiana border.

Saturday's earthquake, which was centered five miles south of Galesburg, was a magnitude 4.2 and could be felt in parts of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin.

"We've got reports it's been felt all across the state of Michigan," said Paul Caruso, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Colorado, adding that the strongest tremors could be felt near Scotts in southeastern Kalamazoo County.

Quake.jpgThe earthquake originated south of Galesburg in Kalamazoo County in Southwest Michigan. File | MLive.com 

"The intensity of (an earthquake measuring 4.2 on the Richter scale) will typically cause house shaking, people might see their chandeliers swing back and forth, books will fall off shelves," he said.

"It's unusual," Caruso said of Saturday's quake. "We've seen these kinds of earthquakes (in Michigan) before, though these events are very uncommon."

The unusual aspect of this earthquake, Western Michigan University professor of geosciences David Barnes said, isn't necessarily its strength but rather its origin.

"When rocks break, there are energy waves that travel through the earth, and typically (in Michigan) we feel the movement of these waves, not have the breakage occur locally," he said.

"Normally, the earthquake shocks we feel around here are energy waves transmitted from a considerable distance away," Barnes said, citing geological activity near the New Madrid fault line in southern Illinois, Kentucky and Missouri, a region which typically transmit tremors to the Great Lakes.

"We don't really have those sources of energy to form or break rocks," Barnes added. "Apparently, this earthquake originated five or six miles deep. That's pretty unusual."

In the 15 years that meteorologist Ernie Ostunu has worked for the National Weather Service in Grand Rapids, he's never experienced anything like Saturday's earthquake.

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Seems more like the earth is shifting everywhere, even places where quakes are rare.

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Nibiru? :1XqXnoz:  :chuckle:

Ive heard of and researched the Expanding Earth Theory. 

Sounds plausible.  Makes sense. 

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Nukes, perhaps related to Jade Helm?

No, not nukes.

Probably the other n-word.

Nibiru. Planet X, Wormwood.

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My King prophesied ALL these things, and still mankind tries to give intellectual sounding theories or just shrug thier shoulders. And I'm the one who gets bashed. That is written as well, and I love being hated for his name sake. 

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