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How Does The NSA +Easily+ Track *Your* Online Activity?

8 posts in this topic

One word: CloudFlare

Yup, that's the raison d'existence for CloudFlare.

For those who don't know what CloudFlare is: What it does is protect websites from DDoS attacks.  It does so by acting as an intermediary (proxy, between you and the website's server.)  When a DDoS is directed at a website then CloudFlare will absorb the DDoS hits, thereby shielding the 'endpoint' site from the attack.  Sounds good, right?  Works in practice? Yes...

...however, it's the same old Illuminati formula once again: "Let us protect you from the bad guys." (but they, of course, act as both "the good guys" and the bad guys.)  In the case of the Internet: They are the ones behind the DDoS attacks!  Duh. (Problem-Reaction-Solution)

Small websites don't appear to have much option but to make use of CloudFlare (if they don't want to be taken down by DDoSes.)  CloudFlare, however, can collect all traffic going through any website making use of them! (and most websites use CloudFlare.)  IP addresses, images, videos, links, etc, etc, you name it, it all goes through CloudFlare! :vFpL81r:

From:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CloudFlare

"CloudFlare was created in 2009 by Matthew Prince, Lee Holloway, and Michelle Zatlyn, who had previously worked on Project Honey Pot."

From:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Honey_Pot

"Project Honey Pot is a web-based honeypot network, which uses software embedded in web sites to collect information about IP addresses..."

 

Funding
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CloudFlare#Funding_rounds

"In November 2009, CloudFlare raised $2.1 million in a Series A round from Pelion Venture Partners and Venrock.
In July 2011, CloudFlare raised $20 million in a Series B round from New Enterprise Associates, Pelion Venture Partners, Venrock.
...
In September 2015, CloudFlare raised $110 million in a Series D round led by Fidelity Investments, with participation from Google Capital."

 

Venrock
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venrock

"Venrock, a compound of "Venture" and "Rockefeller", is a pioneering venture capital firm formed in 1969 to build upon the successful investing activities of the Rockefeller family that began in the late 1930s."

 

Gee, I wonder who's behind all those big DDoS attacks and fearmongering about "cybercrime" then, hmm?

 

...and what I know took me only 5 minutes to prove using publicly-available information,

SC

:catfilenails:

 

Edited by Sky Cat

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Just now, reg said:

I'm sorry, but what did you prove here?

Funded by the Rockerfellers.  Funded by Google (who are known to work with the NSA.)

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Will you walk into my parlor? said the spider to the fly.

Last year, the web optimization network CloudFlare promised it would double SSL usage on the web in 2014 — and last night, the company made good on its promise. Overnight, CloudFlare deployed its Universal SSL feature, offering free SSL encryption to any site that opted in. All told, that meant two million new sites with the feature, effectively doubling encryption on the web overnight.

In December, CloudFlare announced its plans to offer free SSL, and in August, Google announced it would give SSL sites a boost in search rankings, adding yet another reason to switch.

http://www.theverge.com/2014/9/29/6862695/cloudflare-just-added-ssl-encryption-to-two-million-websites-for-free

Free SSL and better search rankings......come closer Mr. Fly.

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15 minutes ago, YourMom2 said:

Will you walk into my parlor? said the spider to the fly.

Last year, the web optimization network CloudFlare promised it would double SSL usage on the web in 2014 — and last night, the company made good on its promise. Overnight, CloudFlare deployed its Universal SSL feature, offering free SSL encryption to any site that opted in. All told, that meant two million new sites with the feature, effectively doubling encryption on the web overnight.

In December, CloudFlare announced its plans to offer free SSL, and in August, Google announced it would give SSL sites a boost in search rankings, adding yet another reason to switch.

http://www.theverge.com/2014/9/29/6862695/cloudflare-just-added-ssl-encryption-to-two-million-websites-for-free

Free SSL and better search rankings......come closer Mr. Fly.

:vFpL81r:

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When this whole cloudflare thing started gaining steam a few years back I had posted a thread on GLP saying it was time to get rid of DNS servers. And go strictly to an IP based system. Trinity at the time asked how could you create a soley IP based system?

All you would need is a search engine that indexed sites based off an IP address.

Then they asked what if you are running multiple sites off the same server? Apache2 has the ability to do this simply by using subfolders. You could also use DNS locally but that would defeat the whole purpose. The problem is not DNS as much as it is the people who setup the DNS servers. I would guess 60-75% of all DNS servers worldwide are insecure (setup wrong).

Attackers can only attack a DNS server that has been setup wrong. There are certain measures hosting companies can take to make it impossible to attack their DNS servers. However hosting companies won't do that because it would not be in their best interest (financially). If your site is attacked they can simply charge you more and move your site to a DNS server they have setup securely (setup right). And you will pay more for it! But don't worry they will put on a nice act for you and play the victim while making you feel the attacks are solely your fault and your responsibility.

So if site owners want to save money then they can use alternative services like cloudflare, incapsula or one of the other reverse proxy services.

Or you can setup your own DNS server and reverse proxy using bind and nginx. But again the problem is the rest of the DNS servers that makeup the internet.

So has anyone ever used an IP based system?

Wikileaks had their domain dropped a few years ago and was forced to go IP based on clearnet (internet), they also kept the site up using multiple mirrors worldwide.

Wikileaks started on the darkweb so those links still worked it was just the domain name that was suspended on clearnet (the internet).

Domains like conspiracyoutpost.com are nothing more than an IP addresses masked behind a fancy name. You can access the same site using the IP Address (if the server is setup to allow connections using the IP).

The powers to be like the current system because it controls the flow of information. If they don't like the content presented on a website they can simply revoke/suspend your domain name . ICANN has gone global now so that is why they are trying to establish Internet censorship through the use of the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership). And they are changing the rules at the same time. For example now they require domain owners to give up to date personal information and if they find any falsifications that is grounds to have your domain suspended.





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18 minutes ago, rezz said:

When this whole cloudflare thing started gaining steam a few years back I had posted a thread on GLP saying it was time to get rid of DNS servers. And go strictly to an IP based system. Trinity at the time asked how could you create a soley IP based system?

All you would need is a search engine that indexed sites based off an IP address.

Then they asked what if you are running multiple sites off the same server? Apache2 has the ability to do this simply by using subfolders. You could also use DNS locally but that would defeat the whole purpose. The problem is not DNS as much as it is the people who setup the DNS servers. I would guess 60-75% of all DNS servers worldwide are insecure (setup wrong).

Attackers can only attack a DNS server that has been setup wrong. There are certain measures hosting companies can take to make it impossible to attack their DNS servers. However hosting companies won't do that because it would not be in their best interest (financially). If your site is attacked they can simply charge you more and move your site to a DNS server they have setup securely (setup right). And you will pay more for it! But don't worry they will put on a nice act for you and play the victim while making you feel the attacks are solely your fault and your responsibility.

So if site owners want to save money then they can use alternative services like cloudflare, incapsula or one of the other reverse proxy services.

Or you can setup your own DNS server and reverse proxy using bind and nginx. But again the problem is the rest of the DNS servers that makeup the internet.

So has anyone ever used an IP based system?

Wikileaks had their domain dropped a few years ago and was forced to go IP based on clearnet (internet), they also kept the site up using multiple mirrors worldwide.

Wikileaks started on the darkweb so those links still worked it was just the domain name that was suspended on clearnet (the internet).

Domains like conspiracyoutpost.com are nothing more than an IP addresses masked behind a fancy name. You can access the same site using the IP Address (if the server is setup to allow connections using the IP).

The powers to be like the current system because it controls the flow of information. If they don't like the content presented on a website they can simply revoke/suspend your domain name . ICANN has gone global now so that is why they are trying to establish Internet censorship through the use of the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership). And they are changing the rules at the same time. For example now they require domain owners to give up to date personal information and if they find any falsifications that is grounds to have your domain suspended.




 

Of course one can make lists of IP addresses and still use them directly in some instances (although it's becoming fewer and fewer due to CloudFlare.)  Naturally, if we were to switch over to 'a purely IP-based Web/Net' (with no DNS) and "use search engines instead" then the search engines would effectively be functioning "as DNS" and are vulnerable (perhaps more-so) to weaknesses of DNS.  I used to make lists of website IP addresses, to use directly, but it's sort-of pointless nowadays, because of CloudFlare, etc.

The Internet, by design, is largely peer-to-peer, with a smidgeon of decentralisation.  The DNS system, of course, maintains a central hierarchy; and, so, I would suggest the best solution is a new DNS: One that is completely decentralised (no hierarchy = no "kill switch".)

Edited by Sky Cat

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3 hours ago, Sky Cat said:

Of course one can make lists of IP addresses and still use them directly in some instances (although it's becoming fewer and fewer due to CloudFlare.)  Naturally, if we were to switch over to 'a purely IP-based Web/Net' (with no DNS) and "use search engines instead" then the search engines would effectively be functioning "as DNS" and are vulnerable (perhaps more-so) to weaknesses of DNS.  I used to make lists of website IP addresses, to use directly, but it's sort-of pointless nowadays, because of CloudFlare, etc.

The Internet, by design, is largely peer-to-peer, with a smidgeon of decentralisation.  The DNS system, of course, maintains a central hierarchy; and, so, I would suggest the best solution is a new DNS: One that is completely decentralised (no hierarchy = no "kill switch".)

The search engine could run on multiple mirrors then there is no single point to attack.

The internet does not need DNS. Look at how the deepweb is structured in much the same way the torrent networks are structured. Everyone is sharing bandwidth. The software is out there people just don't take advantage of it. 

Just like everything there is always unforeseen disadvantages but do they outweigh the advantages? DNS is only a small part of the problem when it comes to the internet. The real problems come with power hungry dictators trying to regulate the internet. The internet ran fine for years until they tried to govern it. Now it is becoming a cesspool of propaganda.

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