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WhiteHorse

Human DNA in hot dogs and vegetarian products.

12 posts in this topic

 
 
Human DNA in hot dogs and vegetarian products.
 
And scientist said we came from monkeys, it's evident we evolved from hotdogs and vegetarian products. 
I'm going out and buy more hotdogs, I mean if I consume more human DNA. I will become more human, right?. 
 
Makes you wonder where the human DNA comes from, 2% is a lot of fingers missing on the meat line? 
 
 
<snip>
  • Substitution: We encountered a surprising number of substitutions or unexpected ingredients. We found evidence of meats not found on labels, an absence of ingredients advertised on labels, and meat in some vegetarian products. 
  • Hygienic issues: Clear Food found human DNA in 2% of the samples. 2/3rds of the samples with human DNA were vegetarian products.

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No one was spared... not even the vegans!

:chuckle:

 I just hope the DNA I've been eating ain't from a psychopath..... Come to think of it..... I have been a little twitchy lately.:betteryet:

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:chuckle:

 I just hope the DNA I've been eating ain't from a psychopath..... Come to think of it..... I have been a little twitchy lately.

Ah, explains a few thangs, don' it? :biggrin: I'll have to use that excuse next time I get all twitchy.

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:chuckle:

 I just hope the DNA I've been eating ain't from a psychopath..... Come to think of it..... I have been a little twitchy lately.:betteryet:

:jptdknpa:

 

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http://www.snopes.com/clear-foods-hot-dog-dna-study/

 

best paragraph-

Missing from the bevy of articles about human DNA in hot dogs (and meat in veggie dogs) was any explanation about how Clear Food determined those percentages, under which conditions testing occurred, whether any independent entities confirmed or duplicated the claims, and the methodology by which Clear Food arrived at their overall conclusions. Information on the site and Clear Food's Kickstarter provided no information about their testing methods, the credibility of their research, or (most important) what the company's specific objective might be. The flurry of interest bore many similarities to an earlier report claiming California wine was contaminated with  arsenic, peddled by a company that tested alcoholic beverages for "purity." Clear Food similarly touted its "Clear Score," aimed "to reward the brands with the highest average scores" based on criteria known only by Clear Food.

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http://www.snopes.com/clear-foods-hot-dog-dna-study/

 

best paragraph-

Missing from the bevy of articles about human DNA in hot dogs (and meat in veggie dogs) was any explanation about how Clear Food determined those percentages, under which conditions testing occurred, whether any independent entities confirmed or duplicated the claims, and the methodology by which Clear Food arrived at their overall conclusions. Information on the site and Clear Food's Kickstarter provided no information about their testing methods, the credibility of their research, or (most important) what the company's specific objective might be. The flurry of interest bore many similarities to an earlier report claiming California wine was contaminated with  arsenic, peddled by a company that tested alcoholic beverages for "purity." Clear Food similarly touted its "Clear Score," aimed "to reward the brands with the highest average scores" based on criteria known only by Clear Food.

sounds like conjecture and misdirection to me

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sounds like conjecture and misdirection to me

reminds me of celestial seasonings tea. A speculator did similar testing and was betting on stock rising on their competition and celestial seasonings tea going lower, so they announced their "findings" similar to (below). Later the company did test and test again and could not produce the same results. (releaser of findings made lots of $, even though their data could not be found correct by anyone)

http://www.snopes.com/clear-foods-hot-dog-dna-study/

 

best paragraph-

Missing from the bevy of articles about human DNA in hot dogs (and meat in veggie dogs) was any explanation about how Clear Food determined those percentages, under which conditions testing occurred, whether any independent entities confirmed or duplicated the claims, and the methodology by which Clear Food arrived at their overall conclusions. Information on the site and Clear Food's Kickstarter provided no information about their testing methods, the credibility of their research, or (most important) what the company's specific objective might be. The flurry of interest bore many similarities to an earlier report claiming California wine was contaminated with  arsenic, peddled by a company that tested alcoholic beverages for "purity." Clear Food similarly touted its "Clear Score," aimed "to reward the brands with the highest average scores" based on criteria known only by Clear Food.

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