Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Guest

Did Cottingley Fairies Have The Last Laugh?

30 posts in this topic

Actual box camera two young girls utilized to capture fairy images ...

http://38.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lkus02X2vX1qe90ht.jpg

Eight Troublesome Questions Which Require Answers Remain

1 - If the images were cut outs of either paper or card how were they disposed of without anyone noticing?
2 - Wouldn’t Elsie’s father have searched high and low for any clues?
3 - Cut outs would leave mutilated magazines or remnants from paper drawings - why were none found?
4 - Surely it would be difficult for children to make sure all traces were disposed of without anyone noticing.
5 - Pictures cut out of paper or card always show the white edge of the paper - anyone practicing decoupage knows this.
6 - How were the wings made transparent?
7 - Why didn’t the hat pins show through paper or thin card?
8 - Is it believable that all the photos were taken without any hitches? It would be impossible to get rid of any "mistakes” with the type of plates and film used at that time.

SK

By the way :padllbli: James Randi!

I thought the old faker had died a long time ago.

As for the hoax confessions...

Girls Under Intense Constant Pressure To Recant Story

Over the years Elsie stated constantly that, although the fairies were wonderful, she needed to try to forget all about them.

She said that down the years she got fed up of talking about them.

Elsie and Frances remained tight-lipped until February 17, 1983 when Elsie admitted in a letter of confession (after decades of relentless pressure) that the photographs were a hoax, claiming that they had drawn the fairies, cut them out and fastened them to the ground with hatpins (intensive examination makes this hoax confession highly implausible to anyone that has actually seen the photographs).

So that was that!

Pressured Hoax Confession Leaves Many Unanswered Questions

Or was it?

The mystery still lives on with many people still believing that the Cottingley fairies existed. 

Frances maintained in her last television appearance in 1986 that 'there were fairies at Cottingley’.

Elsie died in April 1988 and Frances died in July 1986.

They gave us a story that has stood the test of time and has done no harm to anyone.

It may be that the real hoax was 'the confession’, made in the hope that they could spare their families from the press, and that somewhere in the spirit world they are both having the 'last’ laugh.

:IBPlzqK: in Hell Randi old scum ASAP!

To read entire rather lengthy post please click on link below:

http://stendek.tumblr.com/post/5290142433/troubling-questions-linger-over-fairy-photos

HAPPY ALL HALLOWS EVE EVERYONE!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The two are not mutally exclusive: There were actual fairies observed and there was a hoax.

Fairies are almost everywhere so I have no doubt there were fairies "there".  Probably they were observed by these girls. (Whether or not they hoaxed photographs in addition to what they saw is another matter, and it certainly seems as though they made some hoax pictures because they don't look like what actual fairies would look like in photographs.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The two are not mutally exclusive: There were actual fairies observed and there was a hoax.

Fairies are almost everywhere so I have no doubt there were fairies "there".  Probably they were observed by these girls. (Whether or not they hoaxed photographs in addition to what they saw is another matter, and it certainly seems as though they made some hoax pictures because they don't look like what actual fairies would look like in photographs.)

Well stated.

There may have been a hoax.

I have learned when it comes to the paranormal that the only hoaxes usually turn out to be the confessions.

I believe that is the case in this instance.

I am not qualified to say conclusively what a fairy looks like.

They do not look like my perception of fairies either.

Should I throw all fairies out with the fairy dust so to speak?

I have no definitive answers.

Any more than that bastard liar James Randi does!

I do know that two girls used a box camera to take some strange photos in the early 1900's.

Other than that it still mystifies the Hell out of me.

HAPPY ALL HALLOWS EVE!

SK

:1XqXnoz:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well stated.

There may have been a hoax.

I have learned when it comes to the paranormal that the only hoaxes usually turn out to be the confessions.

I believe that is the case in this instance.

I am not qualified to say conclusively what a fairy looks like.

They do not look like my perception of fairies either.

Should I throw all fairies out with the fairy dust so to speak?

I have no definitive answers.

Any more than that bastard liar James Randi does!

I do know that two girls used a box camera to take some strange photos in the early 1900's.

Other than that it still mystifies the Hell out of me.

HAPPY ALL HALLOWS EVE!

SK

:1XqXnoz:

Fairies, as the name implies, are "beings of light".  More-specifcially, often appearing as balls of light.  The best chance of recording them is with an infrared camera.  Other than that, "higher sight" / "etheric sight" or "inner vision" is perhaps the best way of perceiving them; however, when it comes to something like "inner vision" (which is how most people, especially in the past perceived fairies), their appearance then becomes subjective and therefore they would/will often appear to the viewer in a context familiar to them and/or as some anthropomorphised form, overlaid by the subconcious mind, not unlike dreams appear.  This is primarily from whence the classic fairy ("fairy tale") depictions originate.  That-said, it is not 'impossible' there could be some "ectolasmic" type of manifestation in some rare instances, which is why I don't entirely rule out some photographic portrayals, even though they are likely unreal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

With 3 decades of investigative reporting under your belt Solomon, Why don't you share some of your investigative reports with us?  We are all ears!

I obviously missed a lot of conspiracy's over the past 30 years because I was preoccupied with raising a family. Now that the kids are grown and my husband is approaching retirement, I have some free time to study these types of things.

I posted a thread about Ted Owens a while ago. How about you start a new thread and expand on that topic for us next?  I find his story quite interesting and would like to know more about the PK Man!

Thank You.

:IGly6RW:

God bless everyone! I was an investigative reporter for over three decades! I was an honest-to-gosh card carrying member of theAerial Phenomena Research Organization of the late Jim and Coral Lorenzen. Also I once possessed disc charged by PK Man Ted Owens. Want fairy tales? Read The Warren Commission Report and the Condon Report. Fantasy at its finest! All financed by United States taxpayers. There is a worldwide coverup of unidentified flying objects, a huge land mass under the interior of our planet. uncatalogued man-like entities, uncatalogued lake and deep sea life and uncatalogued dinosaur-like animals in still unexplored regions. The Cottingley fairy photographs are not the cut-and-dried hoax skeptics make them out to be. Transparent cardboard? I think not! I actually saw the elusive thunderbird photograph! I, like most, surmised that since it was published in a national magazine it would not be difficult to locate. WRONG! My long-term memory is somewhat faulty but I have two tidbits which may assist thunderbird photo seekers. The comic book I purchased was either an X-Men #30 or #31 published by Marvel Comics. That provides a viable time frame. I seem to recall that the photo was in a western type publication with the words Gold Rush somewhere on cover. That is all I can remember. Thunderbird was nailed to side of structure (barn?) with several individuals standing around. Hope that is enough information to help someone locate the blasted thing! Oh, it was a pterodactyl. Some know-it-all remembers it being a big bird. NOPE! The thing was a pterodactyl. Authentic? Who knows? Who really cares? Those who viewed it just want it to surface one more time.

http://stendek.tumblr.com/post/5290142433/troubling-questions-linger-over-fairy-photos

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

With 3 decades of investigative reporting under your belt Solomon, Why don't you share some of your investigative reports with us?  We are all ears!

I obviously missed a lot of conspiracy's over the past 30 years because I was preoccupied with raising a family. Now that the kids are grown and my husband is approaching retirement, I have some free time to study these types of things.

I posted a thread about Ted Owens a while ago. How about you start a new thread and expand on that topic for us next?  I find his story quite interesting and would like to know more about the PK Man!

Thank You.

:IGly6RW:

God bless everyone! I was an investigative reporter for over three decades! I was an honest-to-gosh card carrying member of theAerial Phenomena Research Organization of the late Jim and Coral Lorenzen. Also I once possessed disc charged by PK Man Ted Owens. Want fairy tales? Read The Warren Commission Report and the Condon Report. Fantasy at its finest! All financed by United States taxpayers. There is a worldwide coverup of unidentified flying objects, a huge land mass under the interior of our planet. uncatalogued man-like entities, uncatalogued lake and deep sea life and uncatalogued dinosaur-like animals in still unexplored regions. The Cottingley fairy photographs are not the cut-and-dried hoax skeptics make them out to be. Transparent cardboard? I think not! I actually saw the elusive thunderbird photograph! I, like most, surmised that since it was published in a national magazine it would not be difficult to locate. WRONG! My long-term memory is somewhat faulty but I have two tidbits which may assist thunderbird photo seekers. The comic book I purchased was either an X-Men #30 or #31 published by Marvel Comics. That provides a viable time frame. I seem to recall that the photo was in a western type publication with the words Gold Rush somewhere on cover. That is all I can remember. Thunderbird was nailed to side of structure (barn?) with several individuals standing around. Hope that is enough information to help someone locate the blasted thing! Oh, it was a pterodactyl. Some know-it-all remembers it being a big bird. NOPE! The thing was a pterodactyl. Authentic? Who knows? Who really cares? Those who viewed it just want it to surface one more time.

http://stendek.tumblr.com/post/5290142433/troubling-questions-linger-over-fairy-photos

 

 

Hi CGK.

I will post more on Ted Owens I promise.

Serious health conditions have slowed me.

Just not as young as I used to be my friend.

I was first to note similar features of aliens in two key UFO cases.

Pascaugula, Mississippi and Falkville, Alabama entities.

Photo of Alabama entity taken by sheriff still exists.

No photographic evidence from two abducted fishermen though.

Time frame indicates the aliens were one and the same.

Always keep a watch out for your posts even though I do always comment.

I wish you and yours well.

A SPOOKY ALL HALLOWS EVE!

SK

:yah:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi CGK.

I will post more on Ted Owens I promise.

Serious health conditions have slowed me.

Just not as young as I used to be my friend.

I was first to note similar features of aliens in two key UFO cases.

Pascaugula, Mississippi and Falkville, Alabama entities.

Photo of Alabama entity taken by sheriff still exists.

No photographic evidence from two abducted fishermen though.

Time frame indicates the aliens were one and the same.

Always keep a watch out for your posts even though I do always comment.

I wish you and yours well.

A SPOOKY ALL HALLOWS EVE!

SK

:yah:

Thank You! Looking forward to hearing more about the PK man and his SI's Twitter and Tweeter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The story begins with Elsie borrowing her father’s camera one Saturday afternoon in July 1917, in order to take Frances’s photo, to cheer her up. She had fallen in the beck and been scolded for wetting her clothes. The girls were away for about half an hour and when Elsie’s father developed the plate later in the afternoon, he was surprised to see strange white shapes coming up. He believed these were birds, then sandwich paper, but it was Elsie who told him these were fairies. Apparently, in order to prove that fairies really did exist, Elsie had taken the picture, showing Frances with a troop of sprites dancing in front of her.


In August, the roles were reversed and Frances took a photograph of Elsie with a gnome. The print was under-exposed and unclear, as might be expected when taken by a ten year old. The plate was again developed by Elsie’s father, who suspected that the girls had been playing tricks and refused to lend his camera to them any more. Elsie’s parents searched the girls’ bedroom and waste-paper basket for any scraps of pictures or cut-outs, and also went down to the beck to search for evidence of fakery. They found nothing, and the girls stuck to their story: they had seen fairies and photographed them.

The event was spoken of between friends and family, but that was all. Frances Griffiths sent a letter to a friend in South Africa, where she had lived most of her life. Dated November 9, 1918, she included a photograph of the fairies, and wrote: “I am sending two photos, both of me, one of me in a bathing costume in our back yard, Uncle Arthur took that, while the other is me with some fairies up the beck, Elsie took that one.” The letter continued, matter of factly: “Rosebud is as fat as ever and I have made her some new clothes. How are Teddy and dolly?” On the back of photograph, it read: “Elsie and I are very friendly with the beck Fairies. It is funny I never used to see them in Africa. It must be too hot for them there.”


The case’s first publicity occurred in the summer of 1919, when Polly Wright, Elsie’s mother, went to a meeting of the Theosophical Society in nearby Bradford. She was interested in the occult, having had some experiences of astral projection and memories of past lives. Theosophy, founded by Helena Blavatsky, was the main engine that drove this interest across Britain.
The lecture was on fairy life and Polly mentioned that her daughter and a niece had taken some photographs of fairy. It would be sensational evidence, if only because another dimensional entity had been able to be caught on camera; it is on par with the photographic evidence of a UFOs or alien beings. But whereas the latter have seldom if ever lived up to the stringent methods that would constitute scientific proof, two girls, decades earlier, had apparently succeeded where most adults failed.


The two rough prints moved their way through Theosophical circles and came to the notice of Theosophists at a Harrogate conference in the autumn, and eventually arrived with a leading Theosophist, Edward Gardner, by early 1920.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, as well as a Freemason and a Spiritualist, had been commissioned by the Strand Magazine to write an article on fairies for their Christmas 1920 issue. He was preparing this in June, when he heard of the two fairy prints. He contacted Gardner and borrowed the copies. Still, contrary to what is often reported, Conan Doyle was on his guard. He showed the prints to Sir Oliver Lodge, a pioneer psychical researcher, who thought them fakes, perhaps involving a troupe of dancers masquerading as fairies. One fairy authority told him that the hairstyles of the sprites were too ‘Parisienne’ for his liking. Intriguingly, no-one apparently wanted to examine the original photographs; only the prints were analysed and the two prints, in an enhanced version, would appear in the magazine.

More:

http://www.philipcoppens.com/cottingley.html

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The story begins with Elsie borrowing her father’s camera one Saturday afternoon in July 1917, in order to take Frances’s photo, to cheer her up. She had fallen in the beck and been scolded for wetting her clothes. The girls were away for about half an hour and when Elsie’s father developed the plate later in the afternoon, he was surprised to see strange white shapes coming up. He believed these were birds, then sandwich paper, but it was Elsie who told him these were fairies. Apparently, in order to prove that fairies really did exist, Elsie had taken the picture, showing Frances with a troop of sprites dancing in front of her.


In August, the roles were reversed and Frances took a photograph of Elsie with a gnome. The print was under-exposed and unclear, as might be expected when taken by a ten year old. The plate was again developed by Elsie’s father, who suspected that the girls had been playing tricks and refused to lend his camera to them any more. Elsie’s parents searched the girls’ bedroom and waste-paper basket for any scraps of pictures or cut-outs, and also went down to the beck to search for evidence of fakery. They found nothing, and the girls stuck to their story: they had seen fairies and photographed them.

The event was spoken of between friends and family, but that was all. Frances Griffiths sent a letter to a friend in South Africa, where she had lived most of her life. Dated November 9, 1918, she included a photograph of the fairies, and wrote: “I am sending two photos, both of me, one of me in a bathing costume in our back yard, Uncle Arthur took that, while the other is me with some fairies up the beck, Elsie took that one.” The letter continued, matter of factly: “Rosebud is as fat as ever and I have made her some new clothes. How are Teddy and dolly?” On the back of photograph, it read: “Elsie and I are very friendly with the beck Fairies. It is funny I never used to see them in Africa. It must be too hot for them there.”


The case’s first publicity occurred in the summer of 1919, when Polly Wright, Elsie’s mother, went to a meeting of the Theosophical Society in nearby Bradford. She was interested in the occult, having had some experiences of astral projection and memories of past lives. Theosophy, founded by Helena Blavatsky, was the main engine that drove this interest across Britain.
The lecture was on fairy life and Polly mentioned that her daughter and a niece had taken some photographs of fairy. It would be sensational evidence, if only because another dimensional entity had been able to be caught on camera; it is on par with the photographic evidence of a UFOs or alien beings. But whereas the latter have seldom if ever lived up to the stringent methods that would constitute scientific proof, two girls, decades earlier, had apparently succeeded where most adults failed.


The two rough prints moved their way through Theosophical circles and came to the notice of Theosophists at a Harrogate conference in the autumn, and eventually arrived with a leading Theosophist, Edward Gardner, by early 1920.
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, as well as a Freemason and a Spiritualist, had been commissioned by the Strand Magazine to write an article on fairies for their Christmas 1920 issue. He was preparing this in June, when he heard of the two fairy prints. He contacted Gardner and borrowed the copies. Still, contrary to what is often reported, Conan Doyle was on his guard. He showed the prints to Sir Oliver Lodge, a pioneer psychical researcher, who thought them fakes, perhaps involving a troupe of dancers masquerading as fairies. One fairy authority told him that the hairstyles of the sprites were too ‘Parisienne’ for his liking. Intriguingly, no-one apparently wanted to examine the original photographs; only the prints were analysed and the two prints, in an enhanced version, would appear in the magazine.

More:

http://www.philipcoppens.com/cottingley.html

 

 

Worded nicely.

SK

:yes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember reading about this a long time ago. I want it to be true!  Magic and mystery are wonderful things. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember reading about this a long time ago. I want it to be true!  Magic and mystery are wonderful things. 

You and I (me?) both Cinnamon.

At first glance it screams hoax.

Then I carefully examined the five photos.

Something is definitely amiss.

During my job decades ago I utilized a box camera.

These images mystify as taken by box camera in 1900's.

Nice to hear from you again.

I have been good poster lately.

Always believe in the magic dear friend.

It is always there.

SK

:cheers:

:wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Restore formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.