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That's a nifty lil optical illusion. Could be wrong though. Might actually be fairies. As a Jedi I don't do absolutes, so i can see it as both illusion and reality and not get twisted e.e I see two, for the record, the butterfly winged girl at center right, and at far right, a face of another in the shubbery (i know that's not the right term, I just wanted to use the word shubbery. Ne!)

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It was not until 1978 that James Randi pointed out that the fairies in the pictures were very similar to figures in a children's book called Princess Mary's Gift Book, which had been published in 1915 shortly before the girls took the photographs.

Subsequently, in 1981, Elsie Wright confessed to Joe Cooper, who interviewed her for The Unexplained magazine, that the fairies were, in fact, paper cutouts. She explained that she had sketched the fairies using Princess Mary's Gift Book as inspiration. She had then made paper cutouts from these sketches, which she held in place with hatpins. In the second photo (of Elsie and the gnome) the tip of a hatpin can actually be seen in the middle of the creature. Doyle had seen this dot, but interpreted it as the creature's belly button, leading him to argue that fairies give birth just like humans!

http://hoaxes.org/photo_database/image/the_cottingley_fairies/

 

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They do look like paper cutouts and fairies were quite popular in children's books around the turn of the century.

http://thumbs3.ebaystatic.com/d/l225/m/mG9RaFEeStpL-OpUkELSV2g.jpg

Brownies were popular as well.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/--xv6ct_vOCM/UnxXCZuA-FI/AAAAAAAAjSo/XR2rOH5aG84/s1600/brownies+circle.png

The old days, before Disney, Barney, Muppets, Elmo and Dora when children were imaginative and some adults too.

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It was not until 1978 that James Randi pointed out that the fairies in the pictures were very similar to figures in a children's book called Princess Mary's Gift Book, which had been published in 1915 shortly before the girls took the photographs.

Subsequently, in 1981, Elsie Wright confessed to Joe Cooper, who interviewed her for The Unexplained magazine, that the fairies were, in fact, paper cutouts. She explained that she had sketched the fairies using Princess Mary's Gift Book as inspiration. She had then made paper cutouts from these sketches, which she held in place with hatpins. In the second photo (of Elsie and the gnome) the tip of a hatpin can actually be seen in the middle of the creature. Doyle had seen this dot, but interpreted it as the creature's belly button, leading him to argue that fairies give birth just like humans!

http://hoaxes.org/photo_database/image/the_cottingley_fairies/

 

James Randi?

:qWOMOeB:

Confession?

:roflmao:

SK

Be well.

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 James Randi has an international reputation as a magician and escape artist, but today he is best known as the world’s most tireless investigator and demystifier of paranormal and pseudoscientific claims. Randi has pursued “psychic” spoonbenders, exposed the dirty tricks of faith healers, investigated homeopathic water “with a memory,” and generally been a thorn in the sides of those who try to pull the wool over the public’s eyes in the name of the supernatural.
 

 

 

http://web.randi.org/about-james-randi.html

I know nothing about the man other than what is posted on the above web site. Want to enlighten us SK?

:qWOMOeB:

 

:IGly6RW:

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