Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.
toast

Why aren't lunar eclipses Black?

34 posts in this topic

This is what the "official" answer is: http://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/total-lunar-eclipse.html 

Quote:"

The Moon does not have its own light, but shines because its surface reflects the Sun's rays.

Eclipses of the Moon happen when the Sun, Earth and Moon are aligned to form an almost or exact straight line. The technical term for this is syzygy, which comes from the Greek word for being paired together."

 

I'm sorry but if you have a light source and you move a solid object in front of  it, the light does not magically bend around and illuminate the object being blocked. This to me is total nonsense. Does anyone actually believe this crap?

 

Another Quote "During a Total Lunar Eclipse, the Sun, Earth and Moon form a straight line. The Earth blocks any direct sunlight from reaching the Moon. The Sun is behind the Earth, so the Sun's light casts the Earth's shadow on the Moon. This shadow covers the entire Moon and causes a Total Lunar Eclipse."

 

I'm sorry but every shadow I have ever seen was black, not red. Even if the atmosphere is "refracting" the sunlight to indirectly light up the moon, why is it red? Shouldn't it be blue? Or maybe white? 

 

Anyone else care to weigh in here?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"

The Moon Looks Red

Even though the Earth completely blocks sunlight from directly reaching the surface of the Moon, the Moon is still visible to the naked eye during a Total Lunar Eclipse. This is because the Earth's atmosphere refracts sunlight and indirectly lights up the Moon's surface."

 

Look at the very misleading pic next to that paragraph on the page I linked above. It shows the sun much larger that the earth. When in fact the sun would appear much smaller than the earth from the perspective of the moon.

 

More BS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it's red because of the way light refracts around the atmosphere before reaching the moon. That, and God was like, "when I want to get their attention, i want it to look bitchin'". A lil of both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From where I was in Texas when the moon 'rose' it was almost black from the eclipse. I guess when your the Creator your pallet your color choice....sky's the limit. It was a beautiful sign of the times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a convex lens.

Block all but a small outside circumference of the lens.

Shine a light through it - towards an object. At differing focal lengths.

Record results.

 

?u=http%3A%2F%2Ftse1.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3F

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a convex lens.

Block all but a small outside circumference of the lens.

Shine a light through it - towards an object. At differing focal lengths.

Record results.

 

?u=http%3A%2F%2Ftse1.mm.bing.net%2Fth%3F

Actually, the earth's atmosphere being shaped like a ring, you'd need a ring-shaped lens with an opaque center.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, the earth's atmosphere being shaped like a ring, you'd need a ring-shaped lens with an opaque center.

That is what I was trying to convey.

If you make opaque all but the outside circumference of a convex lens, you will have created a ring.

Edited by VonLud

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is what I was trying to convey.

If you make opaque all but the outside circumference of a convex lens, you will have have created a ring.

Sorry, I only looked at the image which didn't show an opaque center. But yeah, that would simulate an eclipse pretty well, though I'd want the source light to be full-spectrum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I only looked at the image which didn't show an opaque center. But yeah, that would simulate an eclipse pretty well, though I'd want the source light to be full-spectrum.

The lens experiment,  VS. Earth/Moon, is light scattering due to less than optical quality refraction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The lens experiment,  VS. Earth/Moon, is light scattering due to less than optical quality refraction.

So we'll chemtrail the snot out of the lens, eh?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe it's something like Doppler effect with sound and radio waves? Light has frequency/wavelength and apparent color may change when it bends around an object or is impeded or meets an obstacle?

note all the question marks! That means I don't know and I'm grasping at straws.

you make a very good point!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Restore formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor


Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.