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Lucy Barnable

CPS Workers Now Being Installed In Public Schools

31 posts in this topic

NBC 2 News is reporting a new “partnership” between the Erie County Department of Social Services and New York public schools that would place a Child Protective Services (CPS) employee in the Erie County local suburban schools several days per week.

The media unsurprisingly reports this as a way to give school staff faster access to child welfare “expertise” and also “streamlining and expediting” the CPS investigation process. That is, the news is being spun to get parents – who are now seemingly potential criminals up for investigation – to accept this new, intrusive development while your child remains a ward of the State for eight hours a day, five days a week.

This partnership is unnecessary and detrimental to children and parents. Teachers already can and do report suspicions of child abuse which are dealt with swiftly by CPS with the aid of law enforcement. By installing CPS workers in school offices, it is inviting a steady stream of on-the-spot inspections without a parent’s knowledge. This is a removal of due process when an accusation of abuse is arbitrarily leveled at a parent.

http://www.activistpost.com/2015/09/cps-workers-now-being-installed-in-public-schools.html

Child Protective Services is notoriously corrupt.
They've ruined so many families and have kidnapped children for profit and medical experiments.
This is outrageous. Unfortunately nothing will change until parents stop sending their children to these indoctrination centers.
When public schools lose federal funding because of lack of enrollment they will have to listen to demands of the parents.

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Reason #259 not to have my kids in public school.

We homeschooled ours in the early grades, and then some good charter schools opened up nearby. They're in HS and college now, so hopefully we've escaped the encroaching evil in this case. It just pains me that if they ever have kids, they will have to face all this crap. I wouldn't advise anyone to have kids anymore until this evil lunacy passes over.

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We homeschooled ours in the early grades, and then some good charter schools opened up nearby. They're in HS and college now, so hopefully we've escaped the encroaching evil in this case. It just pains me that if they ever have kids, they will have to face all this crap. I wouldn't advise anyone to have kids anymore until this evil lunacy passes over.

College is even worse, because some colleges host the facilitation of the public school system. 

It's all secular humanism. 

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College is even worse, because some colleges host the facilitation of the public school system. 

It's all secular humanism. 

Yes, but by then my kids have been well-grounded. There's always the possibility of making other students think about the propaganda too.

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We homeschooled ours in the early grades, and then some good charter schools opened up nearby. They're in HS and college now, so hopefully we've escaped the encroaching evil in this case. It just pains me that if they ever have kids, they will have to face all this crap. I wouldn't advise anyone to have kids anymore until this evil lunacy passes over.

Good on you.
Homeschooling really isn't as difficult as people make it out to be.
I get tired of hearing that homeschoolers will socially retarded and unable to adapt to the real world.

Children are not dogs and who better to teach them social skills than parents and friends of the family?

I went to both public schools and a Catholic school. The Catholic school was by far better but still not good.
I keep reading about how outraged and fed up parents are with the system and curriculum yet they send them back day after day.
Public education is so damaging and dangerous nowadays. It's scary and nothing is going to change until we force it too. 

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College is even worse, because some colleges host the facilitation of the public school system. 

It's all secular humanism. 

 

I've heard some pretty awful stories.
It makes me glad I chose not to go.
:happy: 

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Good on you.Homeschooling really isn't as difficult as people make it out to be.
I get tired of hearing that homeschoolers will socially retarded and unable to adapt to the real world.

Children are not dogs and who better to teach them social skills than parents and friends of the family?

I went to both public schools and a Catholic school. The Catholic school was by far better but still not good.
I keep reading about how outraged and fed up parents are with the system and curriculum yet they send them back day after day.
Public education is so damaging and dangerous nowadays. It's scary and nothing is going to change until we force it too. 

I was afraid at first that I'd ruin my kids' lives by not meeting state requirements, but as it turned out, all I needed was for a certified teacher to sign off on them passing. The teacher was leader of a homeschool group and made sure we had all our ducks in a row: homework samples, curriculum list and description, etc. I went online to find out what the state required, and then to ebay to find used school textbooks for dirt cheap. Sam's Club also had "all in one" basic curriculum books for each grade, so I just filled in what it lacked via ebay. Cost maybe a total of $25 for books and then various supplies. Of course, I had to plan out the whole year and keep the kids on pace. But testing was at my discretion.

The big test for me was when they went to charter school. Both of them hit the ground running; they were advanced and also socialized well. Now the older one in college is an honors student majoring in computer science and excelling in advanced math, and the younger one is getting straight A's in high school, including dual-enrollment Chinese (the STEM school requires everyone to learn that, and the teachers are native Chinese). My laid-back and frugal approach to homeschooling turned out to be more than adequate. And I never gave them "homework". Easy peasy.

Edited by Challenger

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I was afraid at first that I'd ruin my kids' lives by not meeting state requirements, but as it turned out, all I needed was for a certified teacher to sign off on them passing. The teacher was leader of a homeschool group and made sure we had all our ducks in a row: homework samples, curriculum list and description, etc. I went online to find out what the state required, and then to ebay to find used school textbooks for dirt cheap. Sam's Club also had "all in one" basic curriculum books for each grade, so I just filled in what it lacked via ebay. Cost maybe a total of $25 for books and then various supplies. Of course, I had to plan out the whole year and keep the kids on pace. But testing was at my discretion.

The big test for me was when they went to charter school. Both of them hit the ground running; they were advanced and also socialized well. Now the older one in college is an honors student majoring in computer science and excelling in advanced math, and the younger one is getting straight A's in high school, including duel-enrollment Chinese (the STEM school requires everyone to learn that, and the teachers are native Chinese). My laid-back and frugal approach to homeschooling turned out to be more than adequate. And I never gave them "homework". Easy peasy.

:yourock:

I was terrified at first. I got so much criticism from almost everyone.
I went way overboard with supplies and planning out each moment of the day.
But all that was completely unnecessary. It just fell into place on it's own.

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:yourock:

I was terrified at first. I got so much criticism from almost everyone.
I went way overboard with supplies and planning out each moment of the day.
But all that was completely unnecessary. It just fell into place on it's own.

Yeah, the first year I was being oh-so careful, but by the third year I was like, "You don't feel like doing school today? Me neither. Recess!!"

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Yeah, the first year I was being oh-so careful, but by the third year I was like, "You don't feel like doing school today? Me neither. Recess!!"

Yep, we ended up with a more unschooling approach. lol
Whatever works the best will give the best results in the end I think.

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