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CGK

Tropical Storm Erika!

35 posts in this topic

I'm sure by now everyone is aware of the fact that a Tropical Storm is headed towards Florida. The forecasts are all over the board regarding the possible strength and path of Erika as she approaches the US Mainland. She might go up the East Coast. She might go up the center of Florida. She might cross Florida and enter into the Gulf, or she might fall apart. One thing is certain, Hurricanes have a mind of their own and predicting what they may or may not do is not an exact science.

That being said, anyone living in Erika's path should be preparing for the worst right now. If you buy into the "wait and see theory" it will be too late to prepare once they announce a clear track.

Erika may not develop into a major Hurricane, but that doesn't make her any less dangerous. Even small storms take lives. At the very least people in her path will see flooding, power outages, downed trees and maybe a few tornadoes.

Its been nearly 10 years since Florida has seen a Hurricane.  The last one was Wilma on October 24, 2005. (I was there for that one) In the past 10 years Florida's population has exploded with 19.9 million people currently living in the state. It's reported that 700 people a day are moving to Florida.

What do the statistics have to do with anything? There are a LOT of people living in the state who are complacent and have never been through a Hurricane in their lives. Their idea of prepping is getting a few batteries for the flashlight, some beer, ice, a case of water, fill up the gas tank and get propane for the BBQ grill. If things get really bad, they will just evacuate...right? WRONG! If they survive a 2 day traffic jam heading North, there will be no hotel vacancies until they get to Atlanta.

Most who shelter in place will run out of supplies in a few days and will start begging for FEMA to save them. I know this is an ugly scenario, but It can and will happen at some point for the residents of Florida.

People need to prepare for the worst and hope for the best. As a veteran of many Hurricanes/Typhoons here are a few of my tried and true Hurricane prep tips:

 

- Secure loose items outside your house! The winds may not be strong enough to break a window, but flying debris will break glass. That means take down wind chimes, bird feeders, bring in trashcans, move plants inside, secure patio furniture, etc. Anything left outdoors will become a projectile. Ask your neighbors to do the same so their items don't blow through your windows.

- Freeze jugs of water. Then you will have block ice to keep food cold and after the jugs melt, you have drinking water. Once the power goes off, move jugs of frozen water from the freezer into the fridge and keep the fridge door closed. You can also move some jugs into a cooler filled with drinks to minimize opening the fridge. Remember, if your power is off, the corner store will not have ice either.

- The refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4-6  hours if it is unopened. A full freezer will hold the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half-full) if the door remains closed. If your freezer is not full, fill it up with everything you can think of before the power goes off, i.e. water bottles, jugs of milk, bread, even newspapers to fill in empty space and hold the temp longer.

- If you run out of drinking water, everyone who has a hot water heater has access to 40 or so gallons of clean water. Drain the water from your hot water heater via the valve on the front. Also, if you have a washer in your home, fill the washer with water, when it starts the wash cycle, turn the washer off and you have gallons and gallons of fresh drinking water. Filling the bathtub is also a good idea.

- 30 gallon clean trashcans, lined with trash bags  are a good place to store large amounts of water for flushing toilets, washing dishes, and drinking if need be.

- Newspapers are good to soak up water with. You don’t want to clean up water that may seep into the house with towels, because if there is no power for prolonged periods you have no way to wash and dry wet towels. Newspapers are easily cleaned up and can be thrown away.

- Do laundry and wash dishes before the storm hits. When the power goes out you don’t want heaps of dirty dishes or clothing to deal with. Paper plates and plastic cups are the way to go.

- Charge up all you electronics before the power goes off.

- Fill your car with gas and have cash on hand because ATM’s will not work.

- Stock up on can goods, dehydrated foods, and make sure you have a manual can opener. Don't forget food for your pets too.

- Batteries, flashlights, candles, lanterns, and a battery operated radio are a must have.

- A good cheap way to keep clean without power is to take wet washcloths, put a little soap on them, and seal them in zip lock bags...homemade handi-wipes.

- If you are on medication, get your scripts filled before the storm. After Katrina, people asked for hydrogen peroxide and alcohol for treating cuts and scrapes. Have some on hand.

- Don’t seal your car windows up airtight.  If there is big drop in the barometric pressure, your window’s can implode.

- If you have power and your cable goes out, depending on where you live, an old school TV antenna plugged into your TV will pick up a few local channels.

- Move important items to higher ground. Cover your electronics with trash bags to keep them dry.

- Have a good pair of work gloves and boots on hand. They will be important for clean up after the storm.

- Bleach! You may need it to purify water and to kill mold after the storm.

- If you drink...make sure you have plenty of booze on hand. If you make it through a serious storm...you are going to need it! LOL

- Pay attention to the weather reports, if they tell you to evacuate...DO IT!!  And never underestimate the power of mother nature!

I'm sure we have some "storm veterans" on this forum, so please feel free to add your tips to this thread.

Be safe everyone.......

:grouphug:

 


 

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Meanwhile, the 10th anniversary of Katrina has been all over the news this week. As a reminder the witch brews another storm.

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Gov. Rick Scott declares state of emergency in Florida

Friday, August 28, 2015, 12:06 PM

Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency in Florida Friday in preparation for Tropical Storm Erika.

The state of emergency covers every county in the state.

“I declared a state of emergency this morning which allows us to make sure every resource, including the National Guard, the emergency management team, make sure everybody is getting prepared," Scott said during a media briefing Friday.

Scott said 30 members of the National Guard are pre-positioned, with 8,000 in position to be mobilized.

During the briefing, Scott singled out the Tampa Bay area as a particular area of concern. The Bay area has been dealing with the effects from flooding after storms soaked the area last month.

"We've got concerns across the state now because it's going to be coming clear across the state," he said. "Right now we know that the Tampa/Hillsborough/Pinellas - those areas have been saturated because of the storms we had a couple of weeks ago, so we're going to continue to focus on that."

Scott also addressed people who have recently moved to Florida and may have never experienced a tropical storm before.

More:

http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/news/article.html/content/news/articles/cfn/2015/8/28/governor_scott_decla.html

Hey Gov...I just addressed that new resident thing in this thread. I guess Gov Scott reads COP too!  LOL

 

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WooHOO! Being way north here in DelWHERE, doubt we'll see much, but despite not being able to surf any more, still get excited. Not hoping for property damage, of course, but secretly like to see mother nature try to move the Indian River Inlet North, where it was naturally before they moved it down the coast & built the bridges. ;-)

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Meanwhile, the 10th anniversary of Katrina has been all over the news this week. As a reminder the witch brews another storm.

Funny O was in NOLA giving a speech on the Anniversary of Katrina. I wondered what he was up to.

Katrina was under a  spell as she drove right into the gulf. Lets hope they turn don't use a Hurricane directional device again to steer this one too.

It would play well for them if Erika did impact a lot of people. Rubio and Bush will be all over the airways talking about how they have helped the people of Florida survive past storms and how they are helping now.

FEMA/National Guard can become embedded in the state under the guise of helping the helpless.

Federal money will move in securing votes for the Dems.

Destruction will stimulate the economy when they rebuild, repair and replace whatever is destroyed.

Hummmmmm.......

 

 

 

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I'm sure by now everyone is aware of the fact that a Tropical Storm is headed towards Florida. The forecasts are all over the board regarding the possible strength and path of Erika as she approaches the US Mainland. She might go up the East Coast. She might go up the center of Florida. She might cross Florida and enter into the Gulf, or she might fall apart. One thing is certain, Hurricanes have a mind of their own and predicting what they may or may not do is not an exact science.

That being said, anyone living in Erika's path should be preparing for the worst right now. If you buy into the "wait and see theory" it will be too late to prepare once they announce a clear track.

Erika may not develop into a major Hurricane, but that doesn't make her any less dangerous. Even small storms take lives. At the very least people in her path will see flooding, power outages, downed trees and maybe a few tornadoes.

Its been nearly 10 years since Florida has seen a Hurricane.  The last one was Wilma on October 24, 2005. (I was there for that one) In the past 10 years Florida's population has exploded with 19.9 million people currently living in the state. It's reported that 700 people a day are moving to Florida.

What do the statistics have to do with anything? There are a LOT of people living in the state who are complacent and have never been through a Hurricane in their lives. Their idea of prepping is getting a few batteries for the flashlight, some beer, ice, a case of water, fill up the gas tank and get propane for the BBQ grill. If things get really bad, they will just evacuate...right? WRONG! If they survive a 2 day traffic jam heading North, there will be no hotel vacancies until they get to Atlanta.

Most who shelter in place will run out of supplies in a few days and will start begging for FEMA to save them. I know this is an ugly scenario, but It can and will happen at some point for the residents of Florida.

People need to prepare for the worst and hope for the best. As a veteran of many Hurricanes/Typhoons here are a few of my tried and true Hurricane prep tips:

 

- Secure loose items outside your house! The winds may not be strong enough to break a window, but flying debris will break glass. That means take down wind chimes, bird feeders, bring in trashcans, move plants inside, secure patio furniture, etc. Anything left outdoors will become a projectile. Ask your neighbors to do the same so their items don't blow through your windows.

- Freeze jugs of water. Then you will have block ice to keep food cold and after the jugs melt, you have drinking water. Once the power goes off, move jugs of frozen water from the freezer into the fridge and keep the fridge door closed. You can also move some jugs into a cooler filled with drinks to minimize opening the fridge. Remember, if your power is off, the corner store will not have ice either.

- The refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4-6  hours if it is unopened. A full freezer will hold the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half-full) if the door remains closed. If your freezer is not full, fill it up with everything you can think of before the power goes off, i.e. water bottles, jugs of milk, bread, even newspapers to fill in empty space and hold the temp longer.

- If you run out of drinking water, everyone who has a hot water heater has access to 40 or so gallons of clean water. Drain the water from your hot water heater via the valve on the front. Also, if you have a washer in your home, fill the washer with water, when it starts the wash cycle, turn the washer off and you have gallons and gallons of fresh drinking water. Filling the bathtub is also a good idea.

- 30 gallon clean trashcans, lined with trash bags  are a good place to store large amounts of water for flushing toilets, washing dishes, and drinking if need be.

- Newspapers are good to soak up water with. You don’t want to clean up water that may seep into the house with towels, because if there is no power for prolonged periods you have no way to wash and dry wet towels. Newspapers are easily cleaned up and can be thrown away.

- Do laundry and wash dishes before the storm hits. When the power goes out you don’t want heaps of dirty dishes or clothing to deal with. Paper plates and plastic cups are the way to go.

- Charge up all you electronics before the power goes off.

- Fill your car with gas and have cash on hand because ATM’s will not work.

- Stock up on can goods, dehydrated foods, and make sure you have a manual can opener. Don't forget food for your pets too.

- Batteries, flashlights, candles, lanterns, and a battery operated radio are a must have.

- A good cheap way to keep clean without power is to take wet washcloths, put a little soap on them, and seal them in zip lock bags...homemade handi-wipes.

- If you are on medication, get your scripts filled before the storm. After Katrina, people asked for hydrogen peroxide and alcohol for treating cuts and scrapes. Have some on hand.

- Don’t seal your car windows up airtight.  If there is big drop in the barometric pressure, your window’s can implode.

- If you have power and your cable goes out, depending on where you live, an old school TV antenna plugged into your TV will pick up a few local channels.

- Move important items to higher ground. Cover your electronics with trash bags to keep them dry.

- Have a good pair of work gloves and boots on hand. They will be important for clean up after the storm.

- Bleach! You may need it to purify water and to kill mold after the storm.

- If you drink...make sure you have plenty of booze on hand. If you make it through a serious storm...you are going to need it! LOL

- Pay attention to the weather reports, if they tell you to evacuate...DO IT!!  And never underestimate the power of mother nature!

I'm sure we have some "storm veterans" on this forum, so please feel free to add your tips to this thread.

Be safe everyone.......

:grouphug:

 


 

I went through 3  hurricanes in one year .  Charlie was the worst lost power for about four hours .   Friends of mine did not have power for three days .

 

 The ice companies were handing out ice by the truckload for free .  Everybody fired up their grills and we had one major block party going illinformed up all the meat before it went bad .

 

 if the storm surge is expected evacuate beach areas and low-lying areas. And regardless if you live in a trailer get the hell out of it that's about all the advice I can give from first-hand experience .

 

 Storm surge and tornadoes are the biggest killers next in line is flying debris   And of course some trees are going to get blown over .

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Costal waters are warmer  if it slows down over them it will pick up strength.

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