Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
WhiteHorse

Plague Then And Now

7 posts in this topic

First they dig up plague victims from the 1600's and now plague victims from 2015 including squirrels
 

Possible 1665 'plague pit' latest unearthed link to London's storied past. By Laura Smith-Spark and Kellie Morgan, CNN.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/12/europe/uk-london-plague-pit/

Yosemite National Park closes campsite after squirrels die of plague


Officials at Yosemite National Park have announced they will close one of the park's campsites after two squirrels died of plague in the area.
The 304-site Tuolumne Meadows Campground will be closed from noon Monday until noon Friday so that authorities can treat the area with a flea-killing insecticide. The substance will be sprayed into rodent burrow holes, according to the California Department of Health (CDPH).

Plague is carried by rodents and other animals, and is spread by fleas.


“Although this is a rare disease, and the current risk to humans is low, eliminating the fleas is the best way to protect the public from the disease,” CDPH director and state health officer Dr. Karen Smith said, according to a CDPH press release. 

“By eliminating the fleas, we reduce the risk of human exposure and break the cycle of plague in rodents at the sites. People can protect themselves from infection by avoiding any contact with wild rodents," she added.

Individuals with camping reservations at the site said they were contacted by the park and told their bookings had been canceled. The campsite books up months in advance, within minutes of sites becoming available, according to KTLA 5 News in Southern California.

It comes just one month after a child fell ill with the plague after camping at Yosemite's Crane Flat Campground. The child has been recovering in hospital.


That campground was reopened Friday after also being sprayed with insecticide for four days.

A total of 42 people have contracted plague in California since 1970, resulting in nine deaths. Until this summer, the most recent three cases occurred in 2005 and 2006, with all of those patients recovering.

Meanwhile, Colorado also continues to battle the plague, with two people dying in the state within two months of each other. Twelve Colorado residents have contracted the flea-borne disease since 2014 – a massive surge compared to just eight people during the previous nine years.

Symptoms of plague can include fever, chills, weakness, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, and swollen lymph nodes. It can be treated and cured with antibiotics soon after infection, but can become deadly if treatment is delayed.


The most common form of plague is bubonic, during which patients typically show symptoms two to six days after becoming infected. This is the type that wiped out an estimated 60 percent of Europe's population in the 1300s.

However, septicemic plague is trickier to diagnose, as the victim's glands do not swell.

The third and least common form is pneumatic, which involves pneumonia and is capable of spreading among people through coughing.

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-plague-infected-squirrels-20150814-story.html

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plague is not a pleasant disease. After an incubation period of 2 to 6 days, bubonic plague (the flea transmitted version) causes a sudden onset of fever and prostration associated with painful lymphadenitis in the nodal basin draining the site of the flea bite. Buboes (painful, inflammatory, and necrotic lymph nodes) may point and drain spontaneously. Less than 10% of patients complain of a prior flea bite. Untreated, bubonic plague can progress to septicemic plague within 2 to 6 days. Patients with septicemic plague exhibit shock, ecchymoses, and small artery thromboses resulting in digital gangrene.

http://www.strategypage.com/dls/articles2002/20021129.asp

Plague is also recognized as a potential agent of bioterrorism. It has been used, or considered for use, as a biologic weapon on several occasions. It is important for the medical community to be familiar with the epidemiology, diagnosis, and symptoms of plague so it can deliver an appropriate and calm response should the unthinkable happen.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1200711/

tumblr_nfie76sltQ1u0k6deo1_500.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here in New Mexico, a few people get the Plague every year.  Or the Hanta Virus.

The latest is Tularemia. Stay away from rodents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plague is not a pleasant disease. After an incubation period of 2 to 6 days, bubonic plague (the flea transmitted version) causes a sudden onset of fever and prostration associated with painful lymphadenitis in the nodal basin draining the site of the flea bite. Buboes (painful, inflammatory, and necrotic lymph nodes) may point and drain spontaneously. Less than 10% of patients complain of a prior flea bite. Untreated, bubonic plague can progress to septicemic plague within 2 to 6 days. Patients with septicemic plague exhibit shock, ecchymoses, and small artery thromboses resulting in digital gangrene.

http://www.strategypage.com/dls/articles2002/20021129.asp

Plague is also recognized as a potential agent of bioterrorism. It has been used, or considered for use, as a biologic weapon on several occasions. It is important for the medical community to be familiar with the epidemiology, diagnosis, and symptoms of plague so it can deliver an appropriate and calm response should the unthinkable happen.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1200711/

tumblr_nfie76sltQ1u0k6deo1_500.jpg

You think that's why they are digging up the bodies in the uk.

trying to get that aged DNA for a little bio-time bomb. That old DNA grafted with the new plague would make any treatment we have today obsolete. 

A bored mind is a scary thing:betteryet:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is actually very common out west, but only in small numbers.
It is also curable, but only with the proper and specific antibiotic.
Proper and early diagnosis is critical though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know there is spotty resurgence of it but I thought them closing down yellowstone was kinda wierd, I can't ever remember that. It killed a bunch of prairie dogs too. Wouldn't that be crazy a wave of plague swiping a major continent. Shoot, today we would kill ourselves with bug bombs plague wouldn't even get too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know there is spotty resurgence of it but I thought them closing down yellowstone was kinda wierd, I can't ever remember that. It killed a bunch of prairie dogs too. Wouldn't that be crazy a wave of plague swiping a major continent. Shoot, today we would kill ourselves with bug bombs plague wouldn't even get too.

The chemicals no longer work. We had an influx of fleas after an abnormal rainy season and they have been damn near impossible to eradicate. Frequencies didn't work. Husband bombed his office, still didn't kill them. Constant vacuuming worked the best but still a month later I'm finding a flea or two on the cat after 3 applications of Frontline, 2 pills from the vet, daily combing, frequent washing of pet bed and the liberal application of diatomaceous earth on carpet as well as kitty. These fleas must be some kind of mutants!

So, yeah, we'd be screwed with the new and improved plague.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Restore formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.