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Whooping Cough Outbreaks Traced to Change in Vaccine

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Doctors began vaccinating people against pertussis in the 1940s with a type of vaccine called a whole-cell vaccine, which was made of dead bacteria. This type of vaccine "can raise an immune response, but cannot cause the disease," said the study's lead researcher, Manoj Gambhir, an associate professor of epidemiology at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

Widespread use of this vaccine dramatically cut pertussis infections. Before the 1940s, there were 150 cases of pertussis yearly for every 100,000 people in the United States, but during the 1970s, that number had dropped to an average of 0.5 cases yearly.

But the whole-cell vaccine sometimes caused side effects, such as fevers, and in some severe cases, people developed fever-induced convulsions, Gambhir said.

In 1991, researchers developed a new, "acellular" vaccine that does not contain dead bacterial cells. This vaccine "contains far fewer components of the bacteria and, therefore, far fewer possible biochemical triggers for the adverse events," Gambhir told Live Science.

Doctors began using the acellular vaccine in the U.S. during the 1990s, but it turned out to be less effective than the original vaccine: It prevents 80 percent of cases, compared with the 90 percent of cases that the whole-cell vaccine prevented, Gambhir said. This means that, of the people exposed to the disease, about 20 percent who received the acellular vaccine may still get sick, compared with just 10 percent of those who received the whole-cell vaccine.

http://www.livescience.com/50594-pertussis-acellular-vaccine.html

I just thought I'd mention that bordetella pertussis is a bacteria, and a vaccine can't give you long lasting immunity to a bacteria.

The disease is more severe in babies and young children.  It can be mild in older children and adults.  If you have a cough lasting more than two weeks, there's a good chance it's pertussis.   Doctors don't test for it if you've been vaccinated.

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Messing around with the body's natural immune system seems like it's a task our science is not up to doing. Like most or all Big Pharma products the side effects can be worse than the disease.

I had scarlet fever as a child. It has almost disappeared since then, even though no vaccine was ever created. Other diseases have likewise declined, thanks to improved awareness of cleanliness. We should give credit to the people who build our sanitation systems.

Now we know we shouldn't build our outhouses next to the well we draw our drinking water from.

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Doctors began vaccinating people against pertussis in the 1940s with a type of vaccine called a whole-cell vaccine, which was made of dead bacteria. This type of vaccine "can raise an immune response, but cannot cause the disease," said the study's lead researcher, Manoj Gambhir, an associate professor of epidemiology at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

Widespread use of this vaccine dramatically cut pertussis infections. Before the 1940s, there were 150 cases of pertussis yearly for every 100,000 people in the United States, but during the 1970s, that number had dropped to an average of 0.5 cases yearly.

But the whole-cell vaccine sometimes caused side effects, such as fevers, and in some severe cases, people developed fever-induced convulsions, Gambhir said.

In 1991, researchers developed a new, "acellular" vaccine that does not contain dead bacterial cells. This vaccine "contains far fewer components of the bacteria and, therefore, far fewer possible biochemical triggers for the adverse events," Gambhir told Live Science.

Doctors began using the acellular vaccine in the U.S. during the 1990s, but it turned out to be less effective than the original vaccine: It prevents 80 percent of cases, compared with the 90 percent of cases that the whole-cell vaccine prevented, Gambhir said. This means that, of the people exposed to the disease, about 20 percent who received the acellular vaccine may still get sick, compared with just 10 percent of those who received the whole-cell vaccine.

http://www.livescience.com/50594-pertussis-acellular-vaccine.html

I just thought I'd mention that bordetella pertussis is a bacteria, and a vaccine can't give you long lasting immunity to a bacteria.

The disease is more severe in babies and young children.  It can be mild in older children and adults.  If you have a cough lasting more than two weeks, there's a good chance it's pertussis.   Doctors don't test for it if you've been vaccinated.

I'm pretty sure the adults in the house I'm living had pertussis this winter.  The cough was severe and had that whooping quality to it.

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