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Fourth echelon

Hiroshima as I saw it

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Editor's Note: This article was the first story filed by a reporter on the devastation of Hiroshima by the atomic bomb. A version of this article appeared in the New York Times on August 31, 1945.

HIROSHIMA, Japan, Aug. 27 (UPI) -- HIROSHIMA, Aug. 27, 1945 (UP) -- That the atomic bomb, more than Russia's entry into the war, compelled Japan to surrender as she did on August 15 instead of waging a showdown battle on the Japanese mainland is a justifiable conclusion drawn after one sees what used to be Hiroshima city.

I've just returned to Tokyo from that city, which was destroyed at one stroke by a single atomic bomb thrown by a super flying fortress on the morning of August 6.

There's not a single building standing intact in the city--until recently of 300,000 population. The death toll is expected to reach 100,000 with people continuing to die daily from burns suffered from the bomb's ultra-violet rays.

I arrived in Hiroshima at 0500 on August 22, to find out about my mother who lived in the outskirts of Hiroshima city. Alighting from the train I found that Hiroshima Station, which was one of the largest in western Japan, had gone out of existence.

http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2015/08/04/Hiroshima-as-I-saw-it/8051438702501/?spt=hs&or=tn_int

 

 
 
 

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Editor's Note: This article was the first story filed by a reporter on the devastation of Hiroshima by the atomic bomb. A version of this article appeared in the New York Times on August 31, 1945.

HIROSHIMA, Japan, Aug. 27 (UPI) -- HIROSHIMA, Aug. 27, 1945 (UP) -- That the atomic bomb, more than Russia's entry into the war, compelled Japan to surrender as she did on August 15 instead of waging a showdown battle on the Japanese mainland is a justifiable conclusion drawn after one sees what used to be Hiroshima city.

I've just returned to Tokyo from that city, which was destroyed at one stroke by a single atomic bomb thrown by a super flying fortress on the morning of August 6.

There's not a single building standing intact in the city--until recently of 300,000 population. The death toll is expected to reach 100,000 with people continuing to die daily from burns suffered from the bomb's ultra-violet rays.

I arrived in Hiroshima at 0500 on August 22, to find out about my mother who lived in the outskirts of Hiroshima city. Alighting from the train I found that Hiroshima Station, which was one of the largest in western Japan, had gone out of existence.

http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2015/08/04/Hiroshima-as-I-saw-it/8051438702501/?spt=hs&or=tn_int

 

 
 
 

My father was horribly irradiated during the assembly and transport of that core...guess who got the genetic hand me down luggage :/

Thx for posting.

 

 

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My grandfather was part of the occupation force in Japan after the War was over (NZ engineers corps). Had some interesting stories.

Another guy I knew who was also there (deceased like so many today) told me of his experience saving a young Japanese boy from being run over. He was invited to the boys house by his family for dinner as thanks for plucking out of the way of a fast moving truck. The boys father had been a submarine commander who had spied on NZ as part of their preparations for invading NZ during WWII. They took their fresh water at the heads of the Karamea river ( I lived there for a couple of years) and he asked him what the lights where that went up and down the hills at night as they had not been able to work that out (Deniston incline which transported coal from coalbrookdale to Westport which was the biggest exporter of coal in the British dominion from the 1930's up until 1956. The wagons ran 24/7 and delivered exactly 120 tons per hour to the port as the port cranes could not load the coal any quicker than that.) His submarine was one of the ones the Japanese had with a small sea plane onboard which could be brought on-board with a small crane and folding the wings. There were many sighting of that plane in the Marlborough sounds during 1943 but no-one believed them.

 

My grandfather didn't suffer any ill effects of the radiation after dropping the bombs. Makes you wonder how true the theory of no life on earth for thousands of years after a nuke war. The Japanese were forbidden from owning any business for 7 years after WWII. Most of those big Japanese companies where western ones with Japanese names. The USA used to accuse them of copying their products and they got those copies to be copied from their US owners.

 

The adults hated the occupiers as they basically made them beneficiaries for 7 years who were forbidden to do anything constructive on their own and the kids were made to worship the soldiers by use of chewing gum and baseball. Turned a generation of kids into worshippers of US culture while their parents grumbled on in the background. The soldiers were told to treat the kids well and dish out the US bubble gum and baseball cards to them. All part of a progressive plan to disconnect them from their heritage and culture instead favouring all things US.

 

I remember taking one Japanese student at Canterbury University (in Christchurch NZ) to the museum. When we got to the WWII part of the museum he had to ask us what this was all about. He cried. He told us back in Japan this was covered up. They were not told what they did in WWII. It came as a shock to him. Very much a conspiracy to conceal and rewrite history took place in Japan after WWII.

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