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Microsoft Support Scam Reminder

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I can not believe people are still falling for this Scam, but apparently it's moving like wild fire through the Senior Citizen community.

This week alone I have spoken with 2 elderly individuals who have fallen victim to the scam.

PLEASE tell your Mothers, Fathers, Grandparents and computer challenged friends that Microsoft will not call them to offer help and Microsoft will not post a warning page on their computer with a number to call them.

Send this info to anyone you feel might fall victim to this scam. Better yet, print out the article below and hand it to them.



Avoid tech support phone scams

Cybercriminals don't just send fraudulent email messages and set up fake websites. They might also call you on the telephone and claim to be from Microsoft. They might offer to help solve your computer problems or sell you a software license. Once they have access to your computer, they can do the following:

  • Trick you into installing malicious software that could capture sensitive data, such as online banking user names and passwords. They might also then charge you to remove this software.

  • Convince you to visit legitimate websites (like www.ammyy.com) to download software that will allow them to take control of your computer remotely and adjust settings to leave your computer vulnerable.

  • Request credit card information so they can bill you for phony services.

  • Direct you to fraudulent websites and ask you to enter credit card and other personal or financial information there.

Neither Microsoft nor our partners make unsolicited phone calls (also known as cold calls) to charge you for computer security or software fixes.

Telephone tech support scams: What you need to know

Cybercriminals often use publicly available phone directories, so they might know your name and other personal information when they call you. They might even guess what operating system you're using.

Once they've gained your trust, they might ask for your user name and password or ask you to go to a legitimate website (such as www.ammyy.com) to install software that will let them access your computer to fix it. Once you do this, your computer and your personal information are vulnerable.

Do not trust unsolicited calls. Do not provide any personal information.

Here are some of the organizations that cybercriminals claim to be from:

  • Windows Helpdesk

  • Windows Service Center

  • Microsoft Tech Support

  • Microsoft Support

  • Windows Technical Department Support Group

  • Microsoft Research and Development Team (Microsoft R & D Team)

Report phone scams

Whenever you receive a phone call or see a pop-up window on your PC and feel uncertain whether it is from someone at Microsoft, don’t take the risk. Reach out directly to one of our technical support experts dedicated to helping you at the Microsoft Answer Desk. Or you can simply call us at 1-800-426-9400 or one of our customer service phone numbers for people located around the world.

Entire article here:




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Some "good stuff" from Windblows 10!

Every other release is a better one - I come from a DOS world and programmed in GWBasic and Cobal etc.  When Windows 3.1 was released it was heaven for a lot of us who now had many "shortcuts" to what we needed to script and Excel was so much better than VisiCalc etc.

But in between there have been releases which could have been skipped by many. Windblows ME well, that should have been blown away by the wind - Vista was not mmuch better - 7 Was stable and had some nice features.  8 - well that was such a disaster it was very quicly followed by 8.1 which in all fairness was never designed for the average housewife of granddad to check on his horticulture sites.  It was primarily designed for a touch-screen like a tablet or "All-in-One"   like the ones Packard Bell and Acer made famous - a 26 inch tablet that weighs about 10 pounds.

The Windblows Longhorn was a brilliant concept but the release was not even close to what we were told in "insider" meetings. Yet, they have used some of the concept stuff in 10.  I have taken it for a test-drive but must admit I am not yet ready to replace the stable working (comfort zone) Windblows 7 on my NUC as yet.

The upgrade works fine on new machines with sufficient ram and a processor > or = to i3.

But, my advice for the elderly folk who are not technocrats, is to stay with what they know best. 

Opinion expressed above is mine and no animals or programmers were hurt in the making thereof!

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