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Fourth echelon

Technology, indoor lifestyles destroying humanity’s eyesight

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For a long time, we believed that short-sightedness, or myopia, was largely down to our genes. However, over the past 50 years, myopia has doubled among young people. This raised the question of whether something other than our heritage could be causing such a rapid change in eye health.

According to new studies, years of indoor teaching and heavy use of our ever-present technologies such as computer screens, televisions, tablets and smartphones are to blame.

Today in the UK, 23 percent of 12- and 13-year-olds suffer from short-sightedness, compared to just 10 percent in the 1960s. Experts say that this dramatic increase is due to the fact that modern children play outdoors far less often than they did in past generations.

This is also why Australians are faring much better than the rest of the developed world. Australian kids spend more time playing outside and less time glued to a TV screen or playing computer games.

http://rinf.com/alt-news/newswire/technology-indoor-lifestyles-destroying-humanitys-eyesight/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+RinfAlternativeNewsMediaDailyBreakingNews+(RINF+Alternative+News+Media%3A+Daily+Breaking+News)

 
 
 
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I'm sure your post is lovely if only I could find my glasses! :cjnohced:

Yup, we're addicted to electronic screens....not healthy fer sure.

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I think that the screens /TV & PC/laptop/tablet/phone are a big contributory factor but genes do play a part as well. I have worked with computers since the early days of Radioshack and TRS DOS in the late 1970's and do not even require reading glasses.  I see that most men my age wear glasses or some don't but should and almost all wear or use some form of reading glasses.  I can still sit in front of a TV and read a book then look-up at the TV and have a perfect image. 

But, there's a whole lot of other things that do not work so well anymore - like selective hearing..  LOL

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For a long time, we believed that short-sightedness, or myopia, was largely down to our genes. However, over the past 50 years, myopia has doubled among young people. This raised the question of whether something other than our heritage could be causing such a rapid change in eye health.

According to new studies, years of indoor teaching and heavy use of our ever-present technologies such as computer screens, televisions, tablets and smartphones are to blame.

Today in the UK, 23 percent of 12- and 13-year-olds suffer from short-sightedness, compared to just 10 percent in the 1960s. Experts say that this dramatic increase is due to the fact that modern children play outdoors far less often than they did in past generations.

This is also why Australians are faring much better than the rest of the developed world. Australian kids spend more time playing outside and less time glued to a TV screen or playing computer games.

http://rinf.com/alt-news/newswire/technology-indoor-lifestyles-destroying-humanitys-eyesight/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+RinfAlternativeNewsMediaDailyBreakingNews+(RINF+Alternative+News+Media%3A+Daily+Breaking+News)

 
 
 

Gamer for nearly 20 years. I have perfect 20/10 vision.

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