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WhiteHorse

The desert is drying up call a witch

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The desert is drying up call a witch.


Seems like California was the place to be. Our water table dropped here in Texas from the drought but nothing compared to those poor folks in Cali. The big difference in California is that it's so arid that to fill up their  reservoirs will mean devastating floods worse than ones that have been sweeping various parts of the u.s. In recent months. Seems like they are turning to anything and anyone to wet the desert once again. I really like the comment in the story,not everyone can do it it's like running a ouji board either your born with it or you ain't. I believe if my state was drying up the last thing I would do is consult some type of occult, last I heard the devil ain't in charge of the sprinkler system. 


http://news.yahoo.com/water-witch-dowsing-california-drought-145325572.html

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I used to play with dowsing when I was a kid. :blush: 

Dowsing: The Pseudoscience of Water Witching

Dowsing is an unexplained process in which people use a forked twig or wire to find missing and hidden objects. Dowsing, also known as divining and doodlebugging, is often used to search for water or missing jewelry, but it is also often employed in other applications including ghost hunting, crop circles and fortunetelling.
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Part of the reason for dowsing's longevity is its versatility in the New Age and paranormal worlds. According to many books and dowsing experts, the practice has a robust history and its success has been known for centuries. For example in the book "Divining the Future: Prognostication From Astrology to Zoomancy," Eva Shaw writes, "In 1556, 'De Re Metallica,' a book on metallurgy and mining written by George [sic] Agricola, discussed dowsing as an acceptable method of locating rich mineral sources." This reference to 'De Re Metallica' is widely cited among dowsers as proof of its validity, though there are two problems.
The first is that the argument is a transparent example of a logical fallacy called the "appeal to tradition" ("it must work because people have done it for centuries"); just because a practice has endured for hundreds of years does not mean it is valid. For nearly 2,000 years, for example, physicians practiced bloodletting, believing that balancing non-existent bodily humors would restore health to sick patients.
Furthermore, it seems that the dowsing advocates didn't actually read the book because it says exactly the opposite of what they claim: Instead of endorsing dowsing, Agricola states that those seeking minerals "
should not make use of an enchanted twig, because if he is prudent and skilled in the natural signs, he understands that a forked stick is of no use to him."
http://www.livescience.com/34486-dowsing-water-witching.html

:horse2:

 

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I used to play with dowsing when I was a kid. :blush: 

Dowsing: The Pseudoscience of Water Witching

Dowsing is an unexplained process in which people use a forked twig or wire to find missing and hidden objects. Dowsing, also known as divining and doodlebugging, is often used to search for water or missing jewelry, but it is also often employed in other applications including ghost hunting, crop circles and fortunetelling.
-----
Part of the reason for dowsing's longevity is its versatility in the New Age and paranormal worlds. According to many books and dowsing experts, the practice has a robust history and its success has been known for centuries. For example in the book "Divining the Future: Prognostication From Astrology to Zoomancy," Eva Shaw writes, "In 1556, 'De Re Metallica,' a book on metallurgy and mining written by George [sic] Agricola, discussed dowsing as an acceptable method of locating rich mineral sources." This reference to 'De Re Metallica' is widely cited among dowsers as proof of its validity, though there are two problems.
The first is that the argument is a transparent example of a logical fallacy called the "appeal to tradition" ("it must work because people have done it for centuries"); just because a practice has endured for hundreds of years does not mean it is valid. For nearly 2,000 years, for example, physicians practiced bloodletting, believing that balancing non-existent bodily humors would restore health to sick patients.
Furthermore, it seems that the dowsing advocates didn't actually read the book because it says exactly the opposite of what they claim: Instead of endorsing dowsing, Agricola states that those seeking minerals "
should not make use of an enchanted twig, because if he is prudent and skilled in the natural signs, he understands that a forked stick is of no use to him."
http://www.livescience.com/34486-dowsing-water-witching.html

:horse2:

 

ok I'm goin to put the statement " it must work people have been doing it for a long time" . Right next to" hold my beer and watch this." 

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This clip is pretty interesting, this is from 2011. He corrected them when they called him a water witch and said he was a Christian. Anyway, they tried all kinds of high tech stuff along with this guy's dowsing skills and found water that comes out at 5,000 gallons a minute. He says he's provided 9500 well sites in 39 years.

 

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This clip is pretty interesting, this is from 2011. He corrected them when they called him a water witch and said he was a Christian. Anyway, they tried all kinds of high tech stuff along with this guy's dowsing skills and found water that comes out at 5,000 gallons a minute. He says he's provided 9500 well sites in 39 years.

 

I worked on a pipeline in the summer when I was a kid. Saw man find a buried cable with two pieces of copper wire. The guys with the electronic instruments couldn't pinpoint like this guy. Some people can do it with the magnetism of their bodies, has nothin to do with hocus pocus . 

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I worked on a pipeline in the summer when I was a kid. Saw man find a buried cable with two pieces of copper wire. The guys with the electronic instruments couldn't pinpoint like this guy. Some people can do it with the magnetism of their bodies, has nothin to do with hocus pocus . 

I think so too.
I found all kinds of things when I did it so I thought it worked then.
Now I think it's just intuition or being in tune with your surroundings.

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