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Paul LaViolette's Superwave Predictions

3 posts in this topic

Predictions Part I, 

astronomy and climatology

Superwave Theory Predictions and their Subsequent Verification

 

Galactic Core Explosions – prevailing concept (1980): At the time of this prediction, astronomers believed that the cores of galaxies, including our own, become active (“explode”) about every 10 to 100 million years and stay active for about a million years. Since our own Galactic core presently appears quiescent, they believed it would likely remain inactive for many tens of millions of years. Although, in 1977, astronomer Jan Oort cited evidence that our Galactic core has been active within the past 10,000 years.

 

  • Prediction No. 1 (1980 – 1983): In his Ph.D. dissertation, LaViolette hypothesized that galactic core explosions recur about every 10,000 years and last for several hundred to a few thousand years. He was the first to suggest such a short recurrence time for galactic core explosions and that our own Galactic core undergoes Seyfert-like explosions with similar frequency.

 

Subsequent concurrence (1998): In 1988, Dr. Abshier, a UCLA alumnus and also a Starburst Foundation volunteer, visited astronomer Mark Morris in his office to explain to him Dr. LaViolette’s Galactic explosion hypothesis.  Morris dismissed the idea as having no merit. However, Morris apparently changed his opinion after further observation of the Galactic center because ten years later he was quoted in the November 1998 issue of Discover magazine as saying that the center of our Galaxy explodes about every 10,000 years with these events each lasting 100 years or so.

 

Cosmic Ray Propagation from active cores – prevailing concept (1980 – 1983): At the time of this prediction, astronomers believed that interstellar magnetic fields entrap cosmic rays released from Galactic core outbursts and slow their outward progress so that they reach the Earth after millions of years in the form of a constant low intensity background radiation.  They believed that most of the cosmic rays from a core explosion propagated outward perpendicular to the galaxy’s rotational plane in the direction of its poles where the magnetic field alignment was believed to be parallel to their direction of travel and to offer the least resistance.

 

  • Prediction No. 2 (1980 – 83): Dr. LaViolette’s studies concluded that Galactic center cosmic ray volleys interact minimally with interstellar magnetic fields and are able to propagate radially outward along rectilinear trajectories traveling through the Galaxy at near light speed in the form of a coherent, spherical, wave-like volley. He was the first to suggest this idea of a “Galactic superwave.”

 

Verification (1985): Astrophysicists discovered that X-ray pulsars continuously shower the Earth with high-energy cosmic ray particles that have traveled over 25,000 light-years at nearly the speed of light, following straight-line trajectories unaffected by interstellar magnetic fields.

 

Verification (1997): Astrophysicists detected a strong gamma ray pulse arriving from a galaxy billions of light years away having a redshift of 3.4 (see Prediction No. 13 below). Mainstream media, such as Sky & Telescope magazine, suggested that this gamma ray pulse may be accompanied by a volley of high energy cosmic ray particles travelling at very close to the speed of light along a rectilinear trajectory and that the gamma ray pulse is produced by the radial outward movement of this volley. In effect, they were restating the same Galactic superwave idea that LaViolette had proposed 14 years earlier in the face of stiff resistance from mainstream astronomers.

 

Verification (2000): Radio astronomers announce at the January 2000 American Astronomical Society meeting that the synchrotron radio emission radiated from the Galactic center (Sgr A*) is circularly polarized.  Dr. LaViolette, who was present at the meeting, suggested that the observed circular polarization indicated that cosmic ray electrons were travelling radially away from the Galactic center along straight-line trajectories; see press release.  Scientists present at the meeting concurred.

 

Verification (2014 – 2015): Using NASA’s NuSTAR space telescope and ESA’s XMM-Newton space telescope, X ray astronomers observe an ionized iron wind moving radially outward in all directions from the active core of galaxy PDS 456 and expanding outward at 30% of the speed of light.

 

Cosmic Ray Bombardment of the Earth – prevailing concept (1980 – 83): At the time of this prediction, astronomers believed that the background cosmic ray flux has remained constant for millions of years, that intense cosmic ray bombardments occur very infrequently, perhaps every 30 million years, primarily as a result of nearby supernova explosions.

 

  • Prediction No. 3 (1980 – 1983): During his dissertation research, LaViolette had concluded that a volley of Galactic cosmic rays had bombarded the Earth and solar system toward the end of the last ice age (ca. 14,000 years BP). Also his findings suggested that other such superwaves had passed us at earlier times and were responsible for triggering the initiation and termination of the ice ages and mass extinctions. He was the first to suggest recurrent highly-frequent cosmic ray bombardment of the Earth.

 

Verification (1987): Glaciologists discovered beryllium-10 isotope peaks in ice age polar ice. These indicated that the cosmic ray flux on the Earth became very high on several occasions during the last ice age, confirming Dr. LaViolette’s theory that Galactic superwaves have repeatedly passed through our solar system in geologically recent times.

 

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Prediction No. 1 (1980 – 1983): In his Ph.D. dissertation, LaViolette hypothesized that galactic core explosions recur about every 10,000 years and last for several hundred to a few thousand years.
 
Prediction No. 3 (1980 – 1983): During his dissertation research, LaViolette had concluded that a volley of Galactic cosmic rays had bombarded the Earth and solar system toward the end of the last ice age (ca. 14,000 years BP). 

In other words, we're past due for a cosmic ray bombardment. ELE, Extinction Level Event.

Just wondering what tptb know about this. 

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