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Judge gives chimpanzees human rights for the first time

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For the first time in US history, a judge has decreed that a pair of chimpanzees held at a university research facility are covered by the same laws that govern the detention of humans, effectively rendering the animals as legal “people” in the eyes of the law. New York Supreme Court Justice Barbara Jaffe said that the apes, held at Stony Brook University for research purposes, are covered by a writ of habeas corpus — a basic legal principle that lets people challenge the validity of their detention.

 

The decision comes two years after the Nonhuman Rights Project, an animal rights group, brought legal cases in a bid to free four chimpanzees. The group said the animals — Hercules and Leo at Stony Brook university, and two others on private property — were being unlawfully imprisoned, and should be relocated to a sanctuary. Three lower court judges dismissed the cases as they were raised in 2013, but the Nonhuman Rights Project appealed, eventually convincing Jaffe that the animals were sufficiently intelligent to grant them what amounts to basic human rights.

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And the next step is declaring them citizens and announcing that they have to buy healthcare, pay taxes, et cetera..

Good luck with that crap!

Planet of the Apes, here we come!

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Animal research can be very cruel and disturbing but how far will this go?

                      ‘Animals Are Persons Too’

How does a thing become a person? In December 2013, the lawyer Steven Wise showed the world how, with a little legal jujitsu, an animal can transition from a thing without rights to a person with legal protections. This Op-Doc video follows Mr. Wise on his path to filing the first-ever lawsuits in the United States demanding limited “personhood” rights for certain animals, on behalf of four captive chimpanzees in New York State.

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Mr. Wise (who is also the subject of The New York Times Magazine’s cover story this Sunday) has spent more than 30 years developing his strategy for attaining animal personhood rights. After he started his career as a criminal defense lawyer, he was inspired by Peter Singer’s book “Animal Liberation” to dedicate himself to justice for animals. He helped pioneer the study of animal rights law in the 1980s. In 2000, he became the first person to teach the subject at Harvard Law School, as a visiting lecturer. Mr. Wise began developing his animal personhood strategy after struggling with ineffective welfare laws and regulations that fail to keep animals out of abusive environments. Unlike welfare statutes, legal personhood would give some animals irrevocable protections that recognize their critical needs to live in the wild and to not be owned or abused.

A short documentary here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/23/opinion/animals-are-persons-too.html?_r=0

 

 

 

Edited by Lucy Barnable
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And the next step is declaring them citizens and announcing that they have to buy healthcare, pay taxes, et cetera..

Good luck with that crap!

Planet of the Apes, here we come!

​The monkeys should receive full welfare benefits for life.

We owe it to them for how badly they've been treated for so long.

;)

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​The monkeys should receive full welfare benefits for life.

We owe it to them for how badly they've been treated for so long.

;)

​Can we really afford it... Thing is they are probably more helpful to a nation than the current youth.

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​The monkeys should receive full welfare benefits for life.

We owe it to them for how badly they've been treated for so long.

;)

​Wait a minute, you want to set them free from one form of prison only to imprison them in the welfare system? Now that is seriously cruel!

They do deserve compensation for their poor treatment, imo. 

Perhaps teaching them all Kung Fu, how to live and eat on their own again, and releasing them back in their natural habitats would be the kindest thing we could do for them. (anything else no matter how spacious is just another prison)

*Prepares for "Planet of the Apes Ninja-Style" *

 

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​Can we really afford it... Thing is they are probably more helpful to a nation than the current youth.

​Of course we can afford it.

The US is giving away citizenship to every Tom, Dick and Jose right now.

If we run out of money we'll just print more.

:S

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​Wait a minute, you want to set them free from one form of prison only to imprison them in the welfare system? Now that is seriously cruel!

They do deserve compensation for their poor treatment, imo. 

Perhaps teaching them all Kung Fu, how to live and eat on their own again, and releasing them back in their natural habitats would be the kindest thing we could do for them. (anything else no matter how spacious is just another prison)

*Prepares for "Planet of the Apes Ninja-Style" *

 

​If the monkeys work hard and keep themselves clean they should have no problem assimilating into the mainstream slave labor system, oops I mean work force.

Although free martial arts classes wouldn't hurt... The jungles, oops I mean cities can be dangerous places.

-----

I doubt they could make it in their natural habitat after all they've been through, especially without family or troupe support.

Sadly, a sanctuary is most likely the best alternative.

 

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