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Monsanto Must Pay $93 Million After Poisoning Town

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 West Virginia’s state Supreme Court delivered a landmark victory to opponents of Monsanto, and citizens who were impacted by the company’s pollution are now receiving big payouts.

The court approved a settlement last year that will require the agribusiness giant to spend $93 million to clean up toxic contamination created by the production of herbicides and other products in the small town of Nitro, West Virginia, and this month, the settlement was finalized.

The toxic herbicides Monsanto produced in Nitro included Agent Orange, the notorious herbicide used during the Vietnam War. Dioxin, a chemical byproduct from Agent Orange, is believed to cause serious health problems.

Monsanto operated a herbicide factory in Nitro from 1948 to 2004.

“It’s been a real long haul,” attorney Stuart Calwell told The Charleston Gazette. Calwell represented Nitro area residents in a class action suit that prompted Monsanto to make the settlement.

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http://healthydebates.com/monsanto-must-pay-93-million-after-poisoning-town/

It's about time Monsanto is held accountable for what they do. Now, if the farmers who are losing in court to Monsanto b/c their gmos are contaminating the farmer's fields could get some justice...

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So that's  what that big stink was when we lived there. We had to drive through Nitro to get to our home in Poca. Guess what their school's mascot was? 

http://photos1.blogger.com/img/30/1775/320/thedots.jpg

They changed it when people said it wasn't imposing enough, to this --

http://photos1.blogger.com/img/30/1775/320/pocadots.jpg

Yep, the Poca Dots. Be afraid. Be very afraid.

Seriously, our team won one. Monsanto says, Big Whoop, we're still selling poison.

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Slap on the wrist, just like what happens with the banksters.

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Monsanto is killing all of us...slowly!

Monsanto’s Roundup Responsible for Skyrocketing Rates of Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance and Other Wheat-Related Illnesses?

The mystery behind skyrocketing rates of Celiac disease, gluten intolerance, and other wheat-related illnesses may not have anything to do with wheat or even gluten, but rather the process by which conventional American wheat is grown and harvested.

Unbeknownst to most consumers is the fact that just before harvest, a vast majority of conventional wheat grown in the U.S. is doused in Roundup herbicide, which ends up poisoning your favorite breads, cereals, cakes, and pastries.

Many conventional wheat farmers in America, driven by greed and carelessness, flood their wheat crops with Roundup just before harvest in order to slightly boost yields and reduce harvest time. But the end result is Roundup being absorbed directly into the wheat kernels that end up processed on your dinner plate.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/monsantos-roundup-responsible-for-skyrocketing-rates-of-celiac-disease-gluten-intolerance-and-other-wheat-related-illnesses/5419461

 

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Monsantos days are numbered... sadly, that'll just usher in a more covert and equally destructive alternative.

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Judge upholds Oregon county's GMO ban in rare democratic win vs. Monsanto
A federal judge has partially dismissed a lawsuit brought by two local commercial alfalfa farmers in Oregon and backed by biotech giant Monsanto who sought to overturn a Jackson County ordinance banning the use of GMO seeds.

As reported by Revolution News and The National Law Review, U.S. District Judge Mark D. Clarke struck down the farmers' claim that the anti-GMO ordinance, which was approved overwhelmingly a year ago and is set to take effect June 5, was in violation of the Oregon Right to Farm Act because it was a violation of their right to farm.

In part, the ordinance reads, "It is a county violation for any person or entity to propagate, cultivate, raise, or grow genetically engineered plants within Jackson County."

In his ruling, Clarke said that, while the farming rights law prohibits ordinances and lawsuits that seek to treat common farming methods as trespass or nuisance, it does not protect activities that can harm commercial agriculture. The federal magistrate agreed with the defendants who argued that there was potential to taint organic crops as a result of cross-pollination with nearby commercial GMO crops.
Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/049971_Oregon_county_GMO_ban_Monsanto.html#ixzz3cWaZuAAk

:balpk:

 

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More on this monstrosity.  Now it is seeking to go into stealth mode it seems.

 

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In a complex merger which would lower their tax payments, US agrochemical giant Monsanto is seeking to merge with its Swiss rival, Syngenta, to create a new entity based in the UK.

 

Monsanto has been targeting Syngenta with a proposal for what's known as a "corporate inversion" or a "tax inversion." It's a move widely associated with aggressive moves to pay lower taxes, though sources close to Monsanto told the Guardian that was not their primary motive. 

 

 

On Monday Syngenta rejected a $45 million revised bid from Monsanto. The US company sweetened a previous offer with a $489.84 per share price for Syngenta holders (which Monsanto said was a 43% premium on current prices) and a $2 billion "reverse breakup" fee — to be paid to Syngenta in case regulatory obstacles prevent the takeover from going through. 

"A new parent company, domiciled in the UK, would demonstrate that our merger will create a new global enterprise … [and] provide additional synergies," wrote Monsanto chief executive, Hugh Grant in documents about negotiations released by Syngenta. "We would also propose a new name for the combined company to reflect its unique global nature."

Of the latest offer to join Monsanto as a 'global enterprise' Syngenta said that it included "the same inadequate price, same inadequate regulatory undertakings to close, same regulatory risks." The company has expressed concerns that anti-trust regulations would doom the enterprise as a threat to competition. 

The UK has become an increasingly attractive destination for corporations since Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne cut the the headline corporation tax rate to 20% and established generous tax regulations for the subsidiaries of UK-based corporations. 



Read more: http://sputniknews.com/business/20150609/1023111507.html#ixzz3cdP4B8x9

:blink:

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Borrowing tactic of Philip Morris, agrochemical giant tried to change name as part of corporate merger

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Agrochemical giant Monsanto—known for its power over food systems world-wide—recently suggested a name-change as part of a proposed corporate merger, in what critics say is a bald attempt to bury the poor human rights and environmental reputation associated with the company's brand.

Founded in St. Louis, Monsanto recently revealed that it would like to move its headquarters from the United States to the United Kingdom as part of a proposed merger with Swiss rival Syngenta.

A June 6 letter from Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant, made public by Syngenta, reveals that, as part of the deal, the U.S. company would "also propose a new name for the combined company to reflect its unique global nature."

Gary Ruskin of the consumer organization U.S. Right to Know put the name change differently: "Monsanto wants to escape its ugly history by ditching its name," he said in a press statement. "This shows how desperate Monsanto is to escape criticism: of its products, which raise environmental and health concerns, as well as concerns about corporate control of agriculture and our food system."

Market Watch, not known as a corporate watchdog publication, reiterated this point: "Branding experts said a name change could help Monsanto shed some baggage associated with its past, such as its Vietnam War-era manufacturing of the herbicide Agent Orange, used by the U.S. government in the war and since linked to chronic health problems in humans."

http://www.commondreams.org/news/2015/06/09/monsanto-exposed-trying-hide-ugly-history-ditching-its-name

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