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Fourth echelon

Merriam-Webster adds 1,700 words including 'WTF' and 'meme'

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WASHINGTON, May 27 (UPI) -- Merriam-Webster has added more than 1,700 new words into its dictionary, including "emoji," "colossal squid" and even "WTF" for when you see "NSFW" "memes."

The American reference guide also expanded existing entries by more than 700 new senses and added 3,200 examples that provide contextual information.

 

"Whatever they do or are, all of them are members of this vibrant, expanding language we share. And now they're part of Merriam-Webster Unabridged too," Associate Editor Emily Brewster wrote, announcing the additions.

http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2015/05/27/Merriam-Webster-adds-1700-words-including-WTF-and-meme/2961432724888/?spt=mps&or=3&sn=on

 
 
 
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heh - I'll admit I drop the wtf a little bit --- bf bought me a t-shirt with it on there ...

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heh - I'll admit I drop the wtf a little bit --- bf bought me a t-shirt with it on there ...

​WTF? :qftV4K1:

 
 
 

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Just who at Miriam Webster made the decision to add these "words" ?

Text messages, etc. are introduced into court as evidence both for and against. Would an angry emoji or a happy one influence those looking at the evidence?  Perhaps not so much before these additions. But now they are able to be defined in the dictionary and that gives them a lot more weight as to the meaning. I can see a prosecutor pulling out the dictionary in court...or a defense attorney. In my mind, this would be used against more than as a defense, but would work both ways. I just don't feel the weight is evenly distributed. Sigh. WTF!

<snip>

emoji (n.)
Definition: any of various small images, symbols or icons used in text fields in electronic communication (as in text messages) to express the emotional attitude of the writer, convey information succinctly, communicate a message playfully without using words, etc.

<snip>

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Just who at Miriam Webster made the decision to add these "words" ?

Text messages, etc. are introduced into court as evidence both for and against. Would an angry emoji or a happy one influence those looking at the evidence?  Perhaps not so much before these additions. But now they are able to be defined in the dictionary and that gives them a lot more weight as to the meaning. I can see a prosecutor pulling out the dictionary in court...or a defense attorney. In my mind, this would be used against more than as a defense, but would work both ways. I just don't feel the weight is evenly distributed. Sigh. WTF!

<snip>

emoji (n.)
Definition: any of various small images, symbols or icons used in text fields in electronic communication (as in text messages) to express the emotional attitude of the writer, convey information succinctly, communicate a message playfully without using words, etc.

<snip>

​Good point! I wonder if they added the word 'chemtrail' yet.

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I wonder how many of them will be on The Unicorn Hunters banned words list in the coming years. lol

About the Unicorn Hunters

The late W.T. (Bill) Rabe, known for his clever PR stunts from his days as a Detroit-area publicist, created the Unicorn Hunters in 1971, shortly after he was hired as LSSU's Director of Public Relations. Bill, with the assistance of LSSU Professors of English Peter Thomas, John McCabe, John Stevens and others, came up with the Hunters as a way of garnering more publicity for LSSU, which had just established itself as an independent school after being a branch of what is now Michigan Technological University. The Unicorn Hunters made the news often for activities and events including: the annual List of Words Banished from the Queen's English for Mis-Use, Over-Use and General Uselessness, burning a snowman on the first day of spring, World Sauntering Day, International Stone-Skipping Tournament held annually on Mackinac Island, Unicorn Questing Season and Teacher Thank You Week.

Business leaders might say Bill 'leveraged' (banished in 2001) the Unicorn Hunters in a big way. The group's activities, especially 'word banishment,' attracted the attention of news media everywhere. Bill once had an ABC News crew on campus to film students in their quest for unicorns.
-----

Through the years, LSSU has received tens of thousands of nominations for the list, which now includes more than 800 entries. This year's list is culled from nominations received mostly through the university's website. Word-watchers target pet peeves from everyday speech, as well as from the news, fields of education, technology, advertising, politics and more. A committee makes a final cut in late December.

Though other groups and organizations have compiled similar lists over the years – some of which bear some remarkable similarities and contain some of the same words and phrases – none have outlasted LSSU's list.

Here's a look at some of what was bugging word-watchers over the past year.

http://www.lssu.edu/banished/

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