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titanic1

The Vikings Are The Ones Who Really Discovered America, not Christopher Columbus

35 posts in this topic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7HxCsPho34

 

Nearly 500 years before the birth of Christopher Columbus, a band of European sailors left their homeland behind in search of a new world. Their high-prowed Viking ship sliced through the cobalt waters of the Atlantic Ocean as winds billowed the boat’s enormous single sail. After traversing unfamiliar waters, the Norsemen aboard the wooden ship spied a new land, dropped anchor and went ashore. Half a millennium before Columbus “discovered” America, those Viking feet may have been the first European ones to ever have touched North American soil.

 

Exploration was a family business for the expedition’s leader, Leif Eriksson (variations of his last name include Erickson, Ericson, Erikson, Ericsson and Eiriksson). His father, Erik the Red, founded the first European settlement of Greenland after being expelled from Iceland around A.D. 985 for killing a neighbor. (Erik the Red’s father, himself, had been banished from Norway for committing manslaughter.) Eriksson, who is believed to have been born in Iceland around A.D. 970, spent his formative years in desolate Greenland. Around A.D. 1000, Eriksson sailed east to his ancestral homeland of Norway. There, King Olaf I Tryggvason converted him to Christianity and charged him with proselytizing the religion to the pagan settlers of Greenland. Eriksson converted his mother, who built Greenland’s first Christian church, but not his outlaw father.

Icelandic legends called sagas recounted Eriksson’s exploits in the New World around A.D. 1000. These Norse stories were spread by word of mouth before becoming recorded in the 12th and 13th centuries. Two sagas give differing accounts as to how Eriksson arrived in North America. According to the “Saga of Erik the Red,” Eriksson crossed the Atlantic by accident after sailing off course on his return voyage from Norway after his conversion to Christianity. The “Saga of the Greenlanders,” however, recounts that Eriksson’s voyage to North America was no fluke. Instead, the Viking explorer had heard of a strange land to the west from Icelandic trader Bjarni Herjolfsson, who more than a decade earlier had overshot Greenland and sailed by the shores of North America without setting foot upon it. Eriksson bought the trader’s ship, raised a crew of 35 men and retraced the route in reverse.

After crossing the Atlantic, the Vikings encountered a rocky, barren land in present-day Canada. Eriksson bestowed upon the land a name as boring as the surroundings—Helluland, Norwegian for “Stone Slab Land.” Researchers believe this location could possibly have been Baffin Island. The Norsemen then voyaged south to a timber-rich location they called Markland (Forestland), most likely in present-day Labrador, before finally setting up a base camp likely on the northern tip of the island of Newfoundland.

The Vikings spent an entire winter there and benefitted from the milder weather compared to their homeland. They explored the surrounding region abounding with lush meadows, rivers teeming with salmon, and wild grapes so suitable for wine that Eriksson called the region Vinland (Wineland).

http://www.history.com/news/the-viking-explorer-who-beat-columbus-to-america

The story of the Viking exploration is contained in the sagas that passed by word-of-mouth from one generation to another before being committed to paper. Modern archeological evidence has substantiated much of the saga's story.

We join Leif Ericsson as he leads his crew from Labrador - which he named "Woodland" - to Newfoundland.


"Now sailed they thence into the open sea with a northeast wind, and were two days at sea before they saw land, and they sailed thither and came to an island which lay to the eastward of the land, and went up there and looked round them in good weather, and observed that there was dew upon the grass. And it so happened that they touched the dew with their hands, and raised the fingers to the mouth, and they thought that they had never before tasted anything so sweet.

After that they went to the ship and sailed into a sound which lay between the island and a promontory which ran out to the eastward of the land, and then steered westward past the promontory.

It was very shallow at ebb tide, and their ship stood up so that it was far to see from the ship to the water. But so much did they desire to land that they did not give themselves time to wait until the water again rose under their ship, but ran at once on shore at a place where a river flows out of a lake. But so soon as the waters rose up under the ship, then took they boats, and rowed to the ship, and floated it up the river, and thence into the lake, and there cast anchor, and brought up from the ship their skin cots, and made there booths.

 

After this they took counsel and formed the resolution of remaining there for the winter, and built there large houses. There was no want of salmon either in the river or in the lake, and larger salmon than they had before seen. The nature of the country was, as they thought, so good that cattle would not require house feeding in winter, for there came no frost in winter, and little did the grass wither there.

Day and night were more equal than in Greenland or Iceland, for on the shortest day the sun was above the horizon from half past seven in the forenoon till half past four in the afternoon..."

The discovery of grapes gives the new land a name

"It happened one evening that a man of the party was missing, and this was Tyrker the German. This Leif took much to heart, for Tyrker had been long with his father and him, and loved Leif much in his childhood. Leif now took his people severely to task, and prepared to seek for Tyrker, and took twelve men with him. But when they had got a short way from the house, then came Tyrker towards them and was joyfully received.


Viking Longship
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Leif soon saw that his foster father was not in his right senses... Then said Leif to him: 'Why were thou so late, my fosterer, and separated from the party?' He now spoke first for a long time in German, and rolled his eyes about to different sides, and twisted his mouth, but they did not understand what he said. After a time he spoke Norsk. 'I have not been much farther off, but still I have something new to tell of; I found vines and grapes.'

'But is that true, my fosterer?' quoth Leif.

'Surely is it true,' replied he, 'for I was bred up in a land where there is no want of either vines or grapes.'

They slept for the night, but in the morning Leif said to his sailors: 'We will now set about two things, in that the one day we gather grapes, and the other day cut vines and fell trees, so from thence will be a loading for my ship.' And that was the counsel taken, and it is said their longboat was filled with grapes. Now was a cargo cut down for the ship, and when the spring came they got ready and sailed away; and Leif gave the land a name after its qualities, and called it Vineland.

They sailed now into the open sea, and had a fair wind until they saw Greenland, and the mountains below the glaciers..."

From: http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/vikings.htm

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I would guess the Native American tribes were there long before the Vikings showed up.  Someone could have even been there long before them too.  Perhaps a civilization that is so long gone that we don't even know anything about them.  Maybe not.

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8 minutes ago, The Clucker said:

I would guess the Native American tribes were there long before the Vikings showed up.  Someone could have even been there long before them too.  Perhaps a civilization that is so long gone that we don't even know anything about them.  Maybe not.

That was my thinking also. In that context the post was pretty offensive completely disregarding an entire people.

 

Though no different from the Europeans claiming they invented printing astronomy etc when the Chinese had done so many centuries earlier.

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1 minute ago, Guitar Doc said:

That was my thinking also. In that context the post was pretty offensive completely disregarding an entire people.

 

Especially when that group of people was practically wiped off of the face of the planet.  You bring up some interesting points, Guitar Doc.  I have a beautiful sunburst stratocaster.  I'll post a pic tomorrow if I am able.  Been shredding my lutes for about 10 years now.  Took a break recently, but trying to get into it more.

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2 minutes ago, The Clucker said:

Especially when that group of people was practically wiped off of the face of the planet.  You bring up some interesting points, Guitar Doc.  I have a beautiful sunburst stratocaster.  I'll post a pic tomorrow if I am able.  Been shredding my lutes for about 10 years now.  Took a break recently, but trying to get into it more.

Awesome!

I am posting on a crappy phone and got told my tech can't hook up my new internet connection for another two weeks ...aaah I have already been waiting six weeks.

I will post my guitar I still use the most ...I purchased it second hand when I was 15, a les Paul copy, a Neil Diamond guitar, one of only 5000. Not good out of the box, hollow top and fake PAF pickups with only one coil in each... Feed back worse than anything Kurt Cobain played.

I learned to be a Guitar Doctor because of it.

Filied the frets,  Seymour Duncan screaming demon pickup at the back, an Ibanez F1 in the front I coil tapped each one. Replaced all the frets this year and put in superior tuning heads.

It has a unquie action, everyone who plays it remarks on it.

I haven't finished the refurbish yet. I will replace the original pots and do a new paint job, still black. I took the scratch plate off it on the first day I had it, I like the look better without them.

 

 

The Viking people were interesting. I knew the leif Erikson story from a book I had as a kid called Heroes.

They didn't die out, they just changed names and identities.

They became the Normans and the Rus people who are the Russians who took Russia from the Slav people. Their first capital was Kiev, the Ukraine really is Russia as conquered by the Rus Vikings.

There was a third party of Viking people but I forget what happened to them. After Greenland iced up again (and they thing global warming is a modern thing) they all sought new lands.

Aren't the Iceland people Viking descendants?

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4 hours ago, Guitar Doc said:

Aren't the Iceland people Viking descendants?

Afaik they are. At least Greenland and Iceland were well known to them.

Years ago I've read a strange remark, I'm quoting from memory: "The Vikings had an established trade route between Norway and Canada, they had to suspend it due to pressure from the Church around the year 1100." This doesn't mean that the Vikings colonized Canada, rather that they traded with the Native Americans on a regular basis.

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, roamer said:

Afaik they are. At least Greenland and Iceland were well known to them.

Years ago I've read a strange remark, I'm quoting from memory: "The Vikings had an established trade route between Norway and Canada, they had to suspend it due to pressure from the Church around the year 1100." This doesn't mean that the Vikings colonized Canada, rather that they traded with the Native Americans on a regular basis.

Pressure? Why would the Pope stop the trade? Apparently he knew of the Americas.

Any why were the people who believed in the Norse gods proselytized in the first place? Their mythology is so complicated and is crucial, imo, to our understanding of the real world, whether it be flat, concave, a hologram, toroid, whatever. Please ignore this post if you follow the teachings of Church and Science. My train of thought has been captured and I am once again connecting dots to the current world and how we got here. We should never discount stories handed down from early people. They saw things and were adept in oral recall. 

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asgard

"In the Prose Edda, Gylfi, King of Sweden before the arrival of the Æsir under Odin, travels to Asgard, questions the three officials shown in the illumination concerning the Æsir, and is beguiled. Note that the officials have one eye, a sign of Odin. One of his attributes is that he can make the false seem true.

18th century Icelandic manuscript."

 

And a representation of the 9 worlds of Norse myth:

 

Sorry for derailing, Titanic. Columbus may not have discovered America, but he opened it up to exploitation by the same Church which gave us the Inquisition, witch burnings, wholesale slaughter of natives, and the destruction of the Maya codices. 

Thanks, Church.

Edited by grav

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This is well known to historians already. about 200 years prior, vikings mingled with the natives. the culture mixing can be seen in Minnesota and michigan tribes.

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A Viking boy is left behind after his clan battles a Native American tribe. Raised within the tribe, he ultimately becomes their savior in a fight against the Norsemen.

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4 hours ago, thedudeabides said:

This is well known to historians already. about 200 years prior, vikings mingled with the natives. the culture mixing can be seen in Minnesota and michigan tribes.

Oh, I didn't know that. Nevertheless they don't stop celebrating Columbus?

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7 minutes ago, roamer said:

Oh, I didn't know that. Nevertheless they don't stop celebrating Columbus?

That is more nations than it is historians/anthropologists.

For whatever reason they refuse to change it.

Look up Beardmore dig site and Beardmore sword. That is the irrefutable proof of vikings having been here 200+ years before Columbus. It is a viking burial mound in Ontario Canada. Also, native Americans with Dragon masted canoes throughout Michigan and Minnesota.

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