Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Algorithm The Hacker Movie

1 post in this topic



Your Algorithms Are Not Safe from Hackers

Cybersecurity has become one of the CEO’s biggest worries, according to several surveys. Companies are investing billions in protecting their systems and training their employees. The worldwide cybersecurity market has been estimated at $77 billion in 2015 and will be $170 billion by 2020. However, the field has mostly focused on protecting systems from vulnerabilities in software and hardware. Today’s threats are no longer confined to those two places. As organizations have come to rely more and more on data-driven algorithms, risks are increasingly present in the data itself.


The pattern classification systems that machine-learning algorithms rely on may themselves exhibit vulnerabilities that can be exploited by hackers or other malefactors. One such common vulnerability is that an attacker estimates what data was used to train the machine-learning algorithm and thus is able to manipulate the input data to the algorithm itself.

For example, search-engine-optimization (SEO) companies have long guessed how the search engine machine-learning algorithm was trained and manipulated their website content to boost their results in the search ranking. Senders of junk email try to fool the spam-filtering algorithm by misspelling “bad” words, or adding unrelated words or sentences to their messages so they resemble legitimate email.

Most of us see examples like this every day, and they mostly seem like a minor annoyance – we click on a bad link, or have to delete a few extra emails. But there can be more serious consequences to this kind of fraud. The credit card industry, which has adopted many machine-learning approaches and other statistical, data-driven techniques to identify fraud, has been exposed to such threats for many years. If an attacker knows the usual pattern of a shopper, he can create a series of fraudulent purchases that deviate only slightly from the norm, and thus not be detected by the anomaly detector. For example, an attacker can see what was previously bought in Home Depot and buy products with similar prices at Amazon.


Hackers have been stealing the secret algorithms and tactics used by hedge funds and high-frequency trading firms, according to two security companies.

Such algorithms can be the lifeblood of a financial firm, and are designed to take advantage - often automatically - of infinitesimal price discrepancies in the stock market that may only last for milliseconds.

The security vendor Kroll reports that it has recently investigated three incidents involving hackers stealing such algorithms. "In two of the cases we were able to find the bad guy and stop him before he could share it on the Web," Ernest Hilbert, Kroll's head of cyber investigations for Europe, the Middle East and Africa, tells the Financial Times.

Greg Day, chief technology officer at information security firm FireEye, likewise describes another algorithm-targeting hack attack that his firm's digital forensics investigators recently found. "It was a very targeted attack looking at gaining access to automated trading models," he tells the Financial Times, noting that this is part of a pattern of hackers increasingly executing "targeted attacks going after a high-value return."


This 2014 movie by Brandx Industries has at its core the very issues that are currently shaking the modern world: privacy, human rights, the role the government plays in the lives of its citizens, and the value and power of technology.

Most people have no idea what a hacker can do. Hackers don’t see locks as obstacles; to them they are simply entertainment that can lead to bigger and better things. Most freelance computer hackers don’t care about privacy or laws. They live by one rule: information should be free and everything can be simplified and coded and understood as information.


Share this post

Link to post
Share on other sites
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   You have pasted content with formatting.   Restore formatting

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.