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titanic1

Warp Drives and Bending Time

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[video=youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_OUutTwAm8[/video]

 

This article describes the physics and mathematics behind a class of solutions to the Einstein field equations known as the "warp-drive" metrics. These metrics have been studied (mainly just for fun although they reveal some interesting properties of the field equations) since 1994 and many of the references may be found at the end of the article. This article is divided into two parts. A non-mathematical part accessible to all (hopefully) which relies heavily on analogies with well known systems and asks the reader to believe some statements without proof. The second part is slightly more rigorous and mathematical. It requires some mathematical sophistication as well as some knowledge of General Relativity and Quantum Field Theory.

 

Part I Qualitative discussion.

The idea of traveling to distant stars and galaxies is, to many, quite appealing. Just hop on a rocket and go, right? Well, no, not really. First of all, it would require an awful lot of fuel to accelerate the rocket to high velocities so that the trip could take place in a reasonable amount of time for the astronaut. Here also lies the crux of another problem, namely, time dilation. You see, relativity tells us that if you travel close to the speed of light on the ship and then come back to Earth, the time which passes on the ship is much less than that which has elapsed on Earth. In other words, if the trip to a distant star and back takes a few years for the astronaut, many years have passed on Earth. When the astronauts get back, human society may well have experienced thousands of years (or more). Heck, enough time may have passed for us to have evolved second heads if the astronauts travel at a high enough speeds and far enough distances. This curious effect is related (although it may not be obvious) to the fact that nothing with mass (like a rocket or astronaut) can be accelerated to the speed of light or beyond. The speed of light may seem fast to us but when considering traversing distances on a galactic scale, it is really quite slow (it takes light 100,000 years to cross our galaxy one way!)

Ok, so just putting in lots of fuel in a rocket and setting it off on its way is not such a useful way to explore the universe. Ironically, the very theory which forbids us to explore at arbitrary velocity may also be the one which saves us. The argument I'm going to present is grossly simplified. However, the argument is essentially correct barring some minor musings into things such as how the universe like a spring (it's not but the spring is a good analogy).

 

Consider an un-stretched spring as show in figure 1. This spring is going to represent space. That's right, the space you see around you and that you see when you look up at the night sky. Why a spring? Well, General Relativity treats space (and time) as a dynamical quantity. That is, space can bend and stretch and shrink ( warp!) in different ways as time passes. Kind of like a spring! Now, imagine that you live in the spring (you live in the universe after all). Since you live in the spring, you will feel the effects of this stretching and bending. These effects have a fancy name. They are called gravity. Gravity is described by the theory of General Relativity. Saying that nothing in the universe can travel faster than the speed of light is like saying that nothing in our spring can move faster than the speed of light relative to the spring , or more specifically, relative to certain disturbances of the spring, which we shall now discuss. (This analogy is not quite correct but will suffice for our purpose. What I am really trying to say is that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light but that this is a local phenomenon.)

Read more....   http://www.sfu.ca/~adebened/funstuff/warpdrive.html

A warp drive to achieve faster-than-light travel — a concept popularized in television's Star Trek — may not be as unrealistic as once thought, scientists say.

A warp drive would manipulate space-time itself to move a starship, taking advantage of a loophole in the laws of physics that prevent anything from moving faster than light. A concept for a real-life warp drive was suggested in 1994 by Mexican physicist Miguel Alcubierre; however, subsequent calculations found that such a device would require prohibitive amounts of energy.

Now physicists say that adjustments can be made to the proposed warp drive that would enable it to run on significantly less energy, potentially bringing the idea back from the realm of science fiction into science.

http://www.space.com/17628-warp-drive-possible-interstellar-spaceflight.html

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10 hours ago, titanic1 said:

[video=youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_OUutTwAm8[/video]

 

This article describes the physics and mathematics behind a class of solutions to the Einstein field equations known as the "warp-drive" metrics. These metrics have been studied (mainly just for fun although they reveal some interesting properties of the field equations) since 1994 and many of the references may be found at the end of the article. This article is divided into two parts. A non-mathematical part accessible to all (hopefully) which relies heavily on analogies with well known systems and asks the reader to believe some statements without proof. The second part is slightly more rigorous and mathematical. It requires some mathematical sophistication as well as some knowledge of General Relativity and Quantum Field Theory.

 

Part I Qualitative discussion.

The idea of traveling to distant stars and galaxies is, to many, quite appealing. Just hop on a rocket and go, right? Well, no, not really. First of all, it would require an awful lot of fuel to accelerate the rocket to high velocities so that the trip could take place in a reasonable amount of time for the astronaut. Here also lies the crux of another problem, namely, time dilation. You see, relativity tells us that if you travel close to the speed of light on the ship and then come back to Earth, the time which passes on the ship is much less than that which has elapsed on Earth. In other words, if the trip to a distant star and back takes a few years for the astronaut, many years have passed on Earth. When the astronauts get back, human society may well have experienced thousands of years (or more). Heck, enough time may have passed for us to have evolved second heads if the astronauts travel at a high enough speeds and far enough distances. This curious effect is related (although it may not be obvious) to the fact that nothing with mass (like a rocket or astronaut) can be accelerated to the speed of light or beyond. The speed of light may seem fast to us but when considering traversing distances on a galactic scale, it is really quite slow (it takes light 100,000 years to cross our galaxy one way!)

Ok, so just putting in lots of fuel in a rocket and setting it off on its way is not such a useful way to explore the universe. Ironically, the very theory which forbids us to explore at arbitrary velocity may also be the one which saves us. The argument I'm going to present is grossly simplified. However, the argument is essentially correct barring some minor musings into things such as how the universe like a spring (it's not but the spring is a good analogy).

 

Consider an un-stretched spring as show in figure 1. This spring is going to represent space. That's right, the space you see around you and that you see when you look up at the night sky. Why a spring? Well, General Relativity treats space (and time) as a dynamical quantity. That is, space can bend and stretch and shrink ( warp!) in different ways as time passes. Kind of like a spring! Now, imagine that you live in the spring (you live in the universe after all). Since you live in the spring, you will feel the effects of this stretching and bending. These effects have a fancy name. They are called gravity. Gravity is described by the theory of General Relativity. Saying that nothing in the universe can travel faster than the speed of light is like saying that nothing in our spring can move faster than the speed of light relative to the spring , or more specifically, relative to certain disturbances of the spring, which we shall now discuss. (This analogy is not quite correct but will suffice for our purpose. What I am really trying to say is that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light but that this is a local phenomenon.)

Read more....   http://www.sfu.ca/~adebened/funstuff/warpdrive.html

A warp drive to achieve faster-than-light travel — a concept popularized in television's Star Trek — may not be as unrealistic as once thought, scientists say.

A warp drive would manipulate space-time itself to move a starship, taking advantage of a loophole in the laws of physics that prevent anything from moving faster than light. A concept for a real-life warp drive was suggested in 1994 by Mexican physicist Miguel Alcubierre; however, subsequent calculations found that such a device would require prohibitive amounts of energy.

Now physicists say that adjustments can be made to the proposed warp drive that would enable it to run on significantly less energy, potentially bringing the idea back from the realm of science fiction into science.

http://www.space.com/17628-warp-drive-possible-interstellar-spaceflight.html

A warp drive is not what is needed. A warp bubble is. Getting up to speed isn't the issue, it is surviving the speed that is.

 

As this drive

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RF_resonant_cavity_thruster

Would take care of getting up to FTL. It offers a great deal of sustained thrust at a lower end of fuel consumption. There is another better one like it some man discovered and scientists are trying to figure out, why, it works. Which I find funny.

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