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titanic1

Geronimo's Skull

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csFeK495TGc

The descendants of Geronimo have sued Skull and Bones, a secret society at Yale University with ties to the Bush family, charging that its members robbed his grave in 1918 and have kept his skull in a glass case ever since.

The claim is part of a lawsuit filed in federal court in Washington on Tuesday, the 100th anniversary of Geronimo’s death. The Apache warrior’s heirs are seeking to recover all his remains, wherever they may be, and have them transferred to a new grave at the headwaters of the Gila River in New Mexico, where Geronimo was born and wished to be interred.

 

“I believe strongly from my heart that his spirit was never released,” Geronimo’s great-grandson Harlyn Geronimo, 61, told reporters Tuesday at the National Press Club.

Geronimo died a prisoner of war at Fort Sill, Okla., in 1909. A longstanding tradition among members of Skull and Bones holds that Prescott S. Bush — father of President George Bush and grandfather of President George W. Bush — broke into the grave with some classmates during World War I and made off with the skull, two bones, a bridle and some stirrups, all of which were put on display at the group’s clubhouse in New Haven, known as the Tomb.

The story gained some validity in 2005, when a historian discovered a letter written in 1918 from one Skull and Bones member to another saying the skull had been taken from a grave at Fort Sill along with several pieces of tack for a horse.

Ramsey Clark, a former United States attorney general who is representing Geronimo’s family, acknowledged he had no hard proof that the story was true. Yet he said he hoped the court would clear up the matter.

 

Tom Conroy, a spokesman for Yale, declined to comment on the lawsuit but was quick to note that the Tomb was not on university property.

Members of the Skull and Bones, who guard their organization’s secrecy, could not be reached for comment. Though the society is not officially affiliated with the university, many of Yale’s most powerful alumni are members, among them both Bush presidents and Senator John Kerry, Democrat of Massachusetts.


“Of all the items rumored to be in the Skull and Bones’s possession, Geronimo’s skull is one of the more plausible ones,” said Alexandra Robbins, the author of “Secrets of the Tomb” (Little Brown 2002), a book about the society. “There is a skull encased in a glass display when you walk in the door of the Tomb, and they call it Geronimo.”

Some local historians and anthropologists in Oklahoma have cast doubt on the tale, noting that no independent evidence has been found to suggest that Geronimo’s grave was disturbed in 1918. Ten years later, the army covered the grave with concrete and replaced a simple wooden headstone with a stone monument, making it nearly impregnable.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/20/us/20geronimo.html?_r=0

It's a strange fate that the bones of one of America's most fearful enemies have come to define one of its most hallowed institutions of power. The Apache warlord Geronimo, part-guerrilla, part-shaman, launched raids across the Southwest and harried and evaded U.S. and Mexican troops for nearly three decades until his capture in 1886.

But, as the story goes, the legendary rebel was not allowed to lie in peace after his death in U.S. captivity in 1909: Six members of Yale's Skull and Bones secret society, including Prescott Bush, grandfather of 43rd President George W. Bush, allegedly dug up Geronimo's grave while serving as army volunteers in Oklahoma during World War I. A letter written by one of the member's of the society in 1918 was brought to light by a New Haven-based researcher four years ago: "The skull of the worthy Geronimo the Terrible," it read, "exhumed from its tomb at Fort Sill by your club... is now safe inside the tomb and bone together with his well worn femurs, bit and saddle horn."

http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1988719_1988728_1988723,00.html

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Geronimo was an amazing man and a living legend in  his time.
He wasn't captured though; he surrendered on September 4 1886.

Native History: Geronimo Is Last Native Warrior to Surrender

“He was not just a tough guy, but he had leadership abilities,” Megehee said. “He looked out for men, women and children in a way that all their needs were met. Geronimo did more with less. In today’s vocabulary, he multiplied his force by stealth, by firepower and by mobility.”

By 1886, however, Geronimo was tired. After leading 39 Apaches across the Southwest, running as much as 80 miles per day to stay ahead of 5,000 white soldiers, Geronimo surrendered to General Nelson A. Miles on September 4.

Miles, in his memoirs, described Geronimo as “one of the brightest, most resolute, determined-looking men I have ever encountered.”

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2013/09/04/native-history-geronimo-last-native-warrior-surrender-151136

I sincerely hope his family is able to recover his remains.

 

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6 hours ago, Lucy Barnable said:

Geronimo was an amazing man and a living legend in  his time.
He wasn't captured though; he surrendered on September 4 1886.

Native History: Geronimo Is Last Native Warrior to Surrender

“He was not just a tough guy, but he had leadership abilities,” Megehee said. “He looked out for men, women and children in a way that all their needs were met. Geronimo did more with less. In today’s vocabulary, he multiplied his force by stealth, by firepower and by mobility.”

By 1886, however, Geronimo was tired. After leading 39 Apaches across the Southwest, running as much as 80 miles per day to stay ahead of 5,000 white soldiers, Geronimo surrendered to General Nelson A. Miles on September 4.

Miles, in his memoirs, described Geronimo as “one of the brightest, most resolute, determined-looking men I have ever encountered.”

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2013/09/04/native-history-geronimo-last-native-warrior-surrender-151136

I sincerely hope his family is able to recover his remains.

 

What a vile thing to do!  The psychology behind such "decisions" and acts is very interesting.  It also says a lot about what people do as a "group" and how they actually feel about it in private.  I hope the spirit of Geronimo rides them every night! 

There is no excuse for the buggers who came after the act in 1918 because as the famous quote says:

Quote

 The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.  
Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955) Physicist & Nobel Laureate

 

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The history of America is not all the star spangled excellence that some people seem to think it is. It's time to throw away the propaganda about our founding and move on.  It's not revisionism,  it's realism. A true Patriot points out the flaws and  works to overcome them. You can't correct past mistakes that you  had nothing to do with,  but you should be able to live and learn.  

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